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Full text of "Annual reports of the officers of state of the State of Indiana"

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DOCUMENTS 



Of THB 



SENERMi ASSEMBLY OF INDIANA. 



AT THE 



THIRTY-FIFTH SESSION, 



oomnRono 



DECEIIBEB 30, 1850. 



VABI VIX8T. 



9T AUTBORITT. 



INDIANAPOLISi 

I. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 
1851. 



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CONTENTS- 



PART I. 

Annual Report of Auditor of State, - • . - . 

Governor's Annual Message, . . . . « 

Annual Report of the Treasurer of State, .... i; 

Annual Report of the Secretary of State, . . » H 

Annual Report of the Warden of tlte Stiat* PrUoot - - li 

Report of the Auditor of Slate, relative to enumeration of 

white male inhabitants, 17 

Veto Message of Gov. Wright — Terre Haute and Richmond 

Railroad bill, 18 

Report of Superintendent of New Albany and Vincennes 

Road, 19! 

Report of committee of H. R. relative to further appropria- 
tions to defray ex^eitfei of ito ConvaatLon,. - • - 20] 
Report of the Visiter to the State Prison,. - • - 20i 
Veto Message of Gov. Wright of House Bill No. 366, (Ses- 
sion of 1849-50,) 217 

Report of the Superintendeati ot GbnulKMi Schools, * 225 
Report of the Commissioners and Superintendent of Hos- 
pital for the Insane, 233 

Memorial of M. and h Railroad Company, • . - 265 

Report of the State Bank, ^ .. . . . . 273 

Report of the committee of Wdys and Means, ^ * 281 



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ANNUAL RETORT 

S 



OF 



THE AUDITOE OF STATE 



OF THK 



STATE OF INDIANA, 



showihg 



THB &BCBIFTS AND DISBURSEMENTS AT THE TREASURY DEPART- 
MENT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1850. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER 

1850. 



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REPORT. 



AtTDlTOtl OF STATE'S OFFICE, ) 

Indianapolis, Novsxbsr 20, 1850. \ 

To the General Assembly: 

In compliance with the law requiring the Auditor of State '' to 
exhibit to the General Assembly, at its annual meeting, a complete 
statement of the revenues, taxables, funds, resources, incomes, and 
property of the State," as well as *' the expenditures of the preceding 
fiscal year,** the following statement is respectfully submitted, show- 
mg the operations of the Treasury Department for the fiscal year 
ending October Slst, 1850, and the condition of the finances at said 
date. 
The several items are presented under the following heads: 

I. A General Statement of the Receipts and Expenditures of the 
State dttring the Fiscal Year. 

II. A Statement of the several Appfxpi'iaiums and of the Amount ear- 
pendedf Balances unexpended^ and Appropriations overdrawn. 

III. The Condition of the State Debt, Foreign and Domestic. 

IV. A Statement in detail of the Receipts and Expenditures of the 
various Trust Funds^ and the Funds appropriated for the Benevo- 
lent Institutions, 

y. Internal Improvements. 

VI. General Remarks. 

VII. Appendix. 



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I. A GENERAL STATEMENT of the Receipts and Eipenditnree 
doriDK the flnaacial year 1850* 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance remaining in the Treasury at the close of 

the last fiscal year, Oct 31, 1849, $428,941 19 

The following sums were received during the financial 
year which closed Oct. 31, 1850, to-wit: 

REVENUE. 

On account of Revenue of 1843, 322 80 

On account of Revenue of 1846, 557 61 

On account of Revenue of 1847, 100 00 

On account of Revenue of 1848, Delinquent, 35,367 17 

On account of Revenue of 1849, 415,114 59 

On account of Revenue of 1850, 4,102 33 

On account of Revenue of 1849, Delinquent, 165 52 

UNIVERSITY FUND. 

On account of Loans refunded. 4,730 60 

On account of Sales of Land, Principal, 129 61 

On account of Sales of Land, Interest, 383 91 

On account of Interest on Loans, 4,230 92 

On account of Costs of advertising refunded, 2 00 

BANK TAX FUND. 

On account of Loans refunded, 395 00 

On account of Interest en Loans, 515 54 

On account of State Bank Assessment, 1,073 65 

SURPLUS REVENUE FUND. 

On account of Loans refunded,- • • 1,282 45 

On account of Interest on Loans, 515 39 

t 

SALINE FUND. 

On account of Loans refunded, • 1,804 89 

On account of Interest on Loans, 1,488 83 

On account of Damages on forfeited Lands, 19 00 

On account of Sales of Saline Lands, Principal, 1^75 08 

On account of Sales of Saline Lands, Interest, 311 65 



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5 

CONGRESSIONAL TOWNSHIP FUND. 

On account of Loans refanded, ''^^22 

On account of Interest on Loans, 101 75 

TRBASVaT FUND. 

On account of Interest on Loans, 35 46 

COMMON SCHOOL FUND. 

On account of Profits of State Bank, 55,863 00 

INDIANAPOLIS LOTS. 

On account of Sales of Lots, 281 25 

HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 

On account of Sales of Lots, 699 97 

On account of Loan from Bank, 13,000 00 

DEAF AND DUMB ASTLUM. 

On account of Loan from Bank,- • : 1»476 50 

MADISON AND INDIANAPOLIS RAIL ROAD. 

On account of Dividend on Stock, 1429 50 

state's prison. 

On account of Sale of Old Prison, 709 64 

On account of Rent of Prison, 10,433 28 

On account of Fees refunded, 2 50 

NORTHERN DIVISION OF CENTRAL CANAL. 

On account of Water Rents, 2,165 74 

LAWRBNCEBUROH AND INDIANAPOLIS RAIL ROAD. 

On account of Loan to Company, 2,061 96 

NEW ALBANY AND VINCENNES ROAD. 

On account of Tolls, 12,621 97 



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ESTATES WITHOUT HJSUtS. 

On ftecount of Estates without Heira, 200 89 

REVISED STATUTES. 

On account of Sales of, 65 55 

WABASH AND ERIE CANAL BY TRUSTEES. 

On account of Tolls and Water Rents, 252,473 01 

On account of Subsciiption by Bondholders, 407,850 00 

On account of Canal Lands, L. & W. of Tippecanoe, 56^635 32 

On account of Canal Lands, Vincennes District,* • • • 75,422 56 

On account of Interest and Exchange, 25,1 14 81 

On account of Error in Disbursements, * 553 00 

On account of Canal Scrip, West of Tippecanoe,* • • 22,490 00 

On account of Canal Scrip, East, Principal, 12,999 88 

On account of Canal Scrip, East, Interest, 3,61 1 03 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

On account of Public Printing refunded, 216 00 

On account of Miscellaneous Items, 100 67 

On account of Suspended Debt, 50 00 

On account of Insurance Tax, 116 00 

Total amount of Receipts from Nov. Ist, 1849 to Oct. 

31, 1850, inclusive, $1,432,442 78 

Add balance in Treasury Nov. 1, 1849, 428,941 19 

Grand Total of Receipts, •* $1,861,383 97 



EXPENDITURES. 

There were audited during the financial year ending October 31st, 
1850, the following sums, to-wit: 

ORDmART EXPENSES. 

On account of Probate Judges, 4,796 00 

On account of Supreme and Circuit Judges, 14,910 81 

On account of State House, 588 71 

On account of Specific Appropriations, 3,114 29 

On account of Public Printing, Paper and Binding,* • 11,522 49 



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On accouat of Legislative Expenses, 31,010 64 

On account of State Libi-ary, 964 81 

On account of The Militia, ' ,539 17 

On account of Stationery and Fuel, 3,453 13 

On account of Executire Def)artment, 5,877 93 

On account of Contingent Fund, to-wit: 

To Jas. Hughes, Att'y in the McGinley case, $400 00 

To Walpole & Quarles, Attorneys in the 

McGinley case, 400 00 

To Snml. H. Buskirk, arbitrator, 105 76 

Transcript of McGinley case,- 96 50 

Postage account, 272 38 

Sundry allowances by Gov* Wright, 491 67 

— — — 1,765 30 

On account of Governor's Circle, 585 34 

On account of Governor's House, 1,309 56 

On account of TranspU of Public Arms, 79 75 

On account of State's Prison, 3,606 63 

On account of Distributing Laws and Journals, 551 54 

PVBI.IC UfiBT. 

On account of Interest for January and July, 188,595 00 

On account of Salary and Expenses of Agency to 

close of CoUins's term, 5»9U 37 

On account of Salary of Agent, Col. May, 1,434 93 

On account of Expenses of Agency, 149 66 

TBEASUay NOTBS. 

On account of Five per cents, cancelled, 46,410 00 

On account of Interest on i»aine» 16,150 68 

On account of Six per cents, cancelled, 86,000 00 

On aoooanl of Interest on same, 43,067 36 

Ob aooonnt of Quarter per centau cancelled* 15?,165 00 

On account of Interest on same, 303 76 

Da account of Incidental Expenses of • • • • 3C1 00 

LNiVBBSlTY FUND. 

On aeoount of Loans, ^ 10,074 00 

On account of Interest refunded, ^ ^ 

Oto account of Damages on Sales of Lands,- • 278 14 

Oa account of Expenses of Fund, 358 96 

On account of Professors' Salaries, 3,700 00 



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8 

SALINE FUND. 



On account of Damages, 431 08 

On account of Distribution of Fund, 6,708 80 

On account of Purchase of Bank Stock, 550 OO 

On account of Expenses of Fund, 75 65 



BANK TAX FUND. 



On account of Distribution of Fund, 3,583 18 

On account of Damages, 41 78 



SURPLUS REVKNUS FUND. 



On account of Loans, 500 00 

On account of Distribution of Fund, 342 02 

OONORBSSIONAL TOWNSHIP FUND. 

On account of Loans, 253 30 

On account of Fund distributed, 57 30 

TREASURY FUND. 

On account of Damages on Loans, 28 64 

CENTRAL CANAL NORTHERN DIVISION. 

On account of Repairs, • 2,548 58 

On account of Incidental Expenses, 1,005 56 

NEW ALBANY 4c VINCBNNBS ROAD. 

On account of Construction, 3,196 02 

On account of Repairs, 6,193 61 

On account of Contingent Expenses, 2,328 85 

On account of Damages, 1 00 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

On account of Estates without Heirs, 292 81 

On account of New State's Prison, 12,935 90 

On account of M. & I. Rail Road Stock, 8,012 33 

On account of Interest on State Bonds, 75 00 

On account of Revenue Refunded, 1^50 62 

On account of Constitutional Convention, 1,014 48 

On account of W. & E. Canal, 613 50 



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BSVfeTOtBNT I58TITVTIOKS. 

On aecooni of Deaf & Dumb Asylum, * 27^979 9S 

On mcooont of Blind Asylum, 11,781 09 

Oo account of Insane Hospital, 32,501 33 

On aecooDt of Superintendent of Insane Hospital,- • - 1,500 00 

JKFFBKSONVILIiB Ib CBAWFORDSVILLB ROAD. 

On acconni of Construction, 16,000 00 

On account of Incidental Expenses, 722 00 

WABASH IB BRIB CAlf AI. BT TBV8TBBS. 

On account of General Expenses of Trustees, 28,675 65 

On account of Expenses of Land OflSce, Vincennes 

District, 1,662 24 

On account of Expenses of Land Office E. and W. 

Tippecanoe, 4.192 68 

On account of Ordinary Repairs, 54,871 74 

On account of Extraordinary Repairs,- • 35,255 29 

On account of Surveys and Locating, 20,396 48 

On acconntof Construction, Coal creek to Terre Haute, 75,€34 38 
On account of Construction, Terre Haute to Pt. Com- 
merce, 184,213 07 

On account of Construction, Pt. Commerce to New- 
bury, 1204209 87 

On account of Construction, Newbury to Maysville, 71,550 25 

On account of Construction South of Maysville,* • • • 151,444 26 

On account of Damages and Water Power, 6,780 50 

On account of Superintendence, , . . . . 9,149 17 

On account of Expense of Collection, 7,542 59 

On account of Interest to Bondholders, 53,409 68 



WABASH Ic ERIB CANAL SCRIP. 

On account of Incidental Expenses, Scrip East,* • • • 45 00 

On account of Incidental Expenses, Scrip West,- • • « 27 00 

On account of Scrip East, Principal cancelled, 25,453 01 

On account of Scrip East, Interest cancelled, 6,056 70 

On account of Scrip West cancelled, 15,845 00 

Whole amount audited during financial year 1850, 
warrants No. 4154 to No. 5202, inclusive, $1,51 3,534 04 



IDi 



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10 
RECAPITULATION. 

Balance in Treasury, Oct. 31, 1849 496,941 19 

Receipts for 1850, 1,433,44S 78 

Deduct Warrants as above 1,513,534 04 

Balance in Treasury Oct. 31, 1850, $347349 93 



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11 



II. STNOFSn of tli« AFFroFrtoUoBt of 
1849^ aft4 showimf amoaata OTerArawB, 



10MS iBclttdiBf BaUseot of 
Mid VBexpendedf Oct. Sltt, 



Apfrmia- 

tionsf^r *50 

inclmiing 

1849. 



Ezp4u4iir*M 
I/18S0. 



Umnwtud 



,Am»iiU 


1,476 Si 


573 48 


«;W7 71 


881 M 


S18 44 
18 80 
314 17 
963 84 


68167 


184 19 


07 3S 


^34 



Legi«l«tnn, • 
BzecutiTtt, 
Jadiciarr, 

Sftme ovenlrawD In 1849, 
PdMIc Printing, • 
Bune ovenlrmwa In 1849. 
Prob&to Jnd«e«, • 
Same ovetdmwn in 1849, 
Specific Appropriation*, 
StoteHottse, 
SUte labrarr, 
XiHtia, . ' . . . 
Oov«»OT*a Roamt, 
Stationery and Fnel, 
8ain« OTenlrawn for 1849, 
SUtoPriaon, • • 

Biatribtttion «>r Lawa and Jonmaia, 
Same ovenlrawn for 1849^ 
Ttmnapt. of Pnblic Anna, 
Same OTeidrawn for 1849, 
Cooti nyent Fnnd, - 
me ovenlxiaK 



awn for 1849, 
OoTer«or*a Circle, 
State Comreation, 



•89,834 14 


•3>>)]0 64 




5,877 93 


16,500 69 


144110 81 




9,169 67 


6,716 00 


11,599 49 




1,471 99 


4,900 00 


4,795 00 




566 00 


4,797 38 


3,114 39 


ro«7 


588 71 


848 01 


904 81 


995 09 


S39 17 


1,045 79 


1,309 56 


3,500 00 


9,453 13 




9636 


3,094 96 


3,606 63 


500 00 


551 54 




U9 56 


190 00 


79 75 




117 60 


500 00 


1,765 30 




348 19 


iOOOO 


596 34 


49J099 69 


1^M« 



1^09 



130 51 



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18 

111. STATE DEBT. 

FOREIGN STATE DEBT. 

Bonds issued for Internal Improvement System, $8,900,000 

lionds issued for Wabash and Erie Canal, 1,727,000 

Bonds issued for State Bank of Indiana,* • • 2,413,000 

Bonds issued for 4th instalment Surplus Revenue,* • • 294,'000 

Bonds issued for Madison and Indianapolis Rail Road, 456,000 
Bonds issued for Lawrenceburgh and Indianapolis 

Rail Road, 221,000 

Bonds, 7 per cent., issued to pay interest on Bonds,* - 4,100,000 

Making total amount issued, $15,111,000 



BONDS REDEEMED AND CANCELLED. 

Surplus Revenue Bonds, • • . 294,000 

Lawrencebui^h and Indianapolis Rail Road Bonds,* • 189,0()Q 

Internal Improvement Bonds, 426,000 

Irregular Bonds cancelled as not sold, 700,000 

Total redeemed and cancelled, $1,609,900 

Add for Bonds on which the Bank pays interest and is 

to redeem principal, 1,390,000 

Add for 7 per cent. Bonds issued but never sold,* • • • 1,064,000 

Making a total of, $4,063,000 

The whole amount issued as above, is* • 15,111,000 

Total amount of Bonds outstanding prior to surrender, 

under State debt arrangement with holders, $11,048,000 



BONDS SURRENDERED. 

Wabash and Erie djtnai Bonds. 

678 Bonds surrendered bv svbscribers prior to July 1st, 

1847, .'. $678,000 

277 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers prior to July 

1st, 1847, 277,000 

164 Bonds surrendered by subscribers to January Ist, 

1848,.... 1 65 ,000 



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1» 

a Bondj Barrendered by noH'tubtcriiert to Jan. 1st, 

1848, , 54,000 

41 Bond* surrendered by non-*ubtcribers to July 1st, . 

1848, 41,000 

8 Bonds surrendered by noit'tubscriben to July 1st, 

1849, '•••• 8,000 

3 Bonds surrendered by nonstibacribei-i to February 4, 

1850, 3,000 

S24 Bonds surrendered by non-substribers to August 5, 

1850, 24,000 

Total surrendered to August 5, 1850, $1,250,000 

hUemal bnjuvvement Bonds. 

5663 Bonds surrendered by tuhacribers to July 1st, 

1847, $5,662,000 

353 Bonds surrendered by non-avbteriber> to July 1st, 

1847, 853,000 

478 Bonds surrendered by tubtcribert to January 1st, 

1848, .*. 478,000 

146 Bonds surrendered by non-ttibscriber* to Jan. 1st, 

1848, 146,000 

45 Bonds surrendered by non^subscribers to July 1st, 

1848, 45,000 

118 Bonds surrendered by 7um-mbscrihert to July Ist, 

1849, ; 118,000 

92 Bonds surrendered by non-mbacribers to February 

4,1850, 92,000 

79 Bonds surrendered by noH'tubtcribers to August 5, 

1850, 79,000 

Total surrendered to August 5, 1850,. $ 6,973,00 

Maditon and Indianapdit Rail Road Bonds. 

300 Bonds simwndered by subscrOers to July 1st, 1847, 300,000 

28 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to July Ist, 

1849, * 28,000 

16 Bonds surrendered by subscribers to January 1st, 

1848, 16,000 

2 Bonds surrendered by non-sitbscrtiiers to January Ist, 

1848, .*.... 2,000 



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14 

2 Bonds surrendered by n&n'subscribers to July 1st, . . 

1848, 2,000 

4 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribei^s to July Ist, 

1849, 4,000 

6 Bonds surrendered bv non-subscribers to Febiuary 4, 

1850, :../ e,ooo 

7 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to August 5, 

1850, 7,000 

Total surrendered to August 5, 1850, $365,000 

Lawrenceburgh and Indianapolis Rail Road Bonds, 



68 Bonds surrendered by subscribers to July 1st, 1847, $68,000 

3 Bonds surrendered by subscribers to Jan. 1st, 1848, 3,000 
1 Bond surrendered by non-subsa^ibers to January 1st, 

1848, 1,000 

4 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to July Ist, 

1849, 4,000 

4 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to Aygust 5, 

1850, 4,000 

Total lurrendered to August 5, 1850, $80,000 



Statf Bank Bonds, 

719 Bonds surrendered by subscribers to July 1st, 1847, $719,000 

27 Bonds sun^ndered by non-subscribers to July 1st, 

1847, 27,000 

52 Bonds surrendered by subsanbers to Jan. 1st, 1848, 52,000 

8 Bonds surrendered bv non-subscinbers to January 1st, 

1848, ' '.. 8,000 

4 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to July Isl, 

1848, 4,000 

28 Bonds surrendered by non-subsa^ibers to July 1st, 

1849, 28,000 

7 Bonds surrendered by non-subscriber s\o February 4, ' 

1850, 7,000 

21 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to August 5, 

1850, 21,000 

Total surrendered to August 5, 1850, $866,000 



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16 



20 
6,0I» 



',.000 
.000 ; 

I 

000 I 

m ! 

30 



&ii6tt Per CenL Bonds issned io poj/t JiUet^t. 

18 Bonds flurrendered by subscribers to Jaly 1st, 1847, $18,000 

3 Bonds surrendered by non^ubscribers to July 1st, 

1847, 3,000 

I Bond surrendered by non-subscribers to January 1st, 

1848, 1,000 

7 Bonds surreodered by non-subscribers to July 1st, 

1848, 7,000 

Toul surrendered to Aogost 5, 1850, $29,000 

Recapttuiaiums 

Bonds outstanding at period of arrangement of State 

Debt, July 1st, 1847, $11,048,000 

Amount surrendered up to August 5, 1850, 9,563,000. 

Total ouUtanding August 5, 1860^ $lyi65,000 



STATfi STOCKS. 

SuUe Five Per Cent. Stock* 

The amount of half the principal of Bonds surrendered oba/geable 
to the State Treasury, for which 5 per cent. &ate Stock issued, is 
' as follows, viz i 

Stock to snbscribers to July 1st, 1847, $8,723,500 

Stock to non-subscribers to July 1st, 1847, 344,000 

Stock to subscribers to January 1st, 1848, 357,000 

Stock to non-subscribers to January 1st, 1848, 106,000 

Stock to nan-subscribers to July 1st, 1848,* • • • • 49,500 

Stock to non-si^cribers to July 1st, 1849,« 81,000 

Stock to ntm-subecribers to Feb. 4, 1850, 54,000 

Stock to Tum-stAscrihers to Aug. 5, 1850, 67,500 

Total 5 per cent. State Stock to August 5, 1850,* * $4,781,500 



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16 



Two and one-half Per Cent. SUUe Stock. 

The amount of one-half the interest and one per cent of the pnn« 
cipal of the Bonds surrendered chai^eable to the State Treasury, for 
which State Stock issued with interest, at the rate of 2i per cent., 
commencing in ISSS, is as follows, viz: 

Stock to subscribers to July 1st, 1847, $1,327,948 00 

Stock to non-subscribers to July 1st, 1847> 121,853 50 

Stock to subsanbers to January 1st, 1848, 126,530 00 

Stock to non-subsaibers to January Ist, 1848, 38,337 00 

Stock to noi'Subscribers to July 1st, 1848, 18,675 00 

Stock to subscribers for one half of coupons on Bonds 

surrendered to January 1st, 1848, • 7,950 00 

Stock to non-subscribers for one-half of coupons on 

Bonds surrendered to July Ist, 1848, 1,325 00 

Stock to non-subscribers for one-half of coupons on 

Bonds surrendered to July 1st, 1849, 33,570 00 

Stock to non-subscribers to Feb. 4, 1850, 23,375 00 

Stock to siAscribers for one-half of coupons on Bonds 

surrendered to Feb. 4, 185J, 2,625 QO 

Stock to non-subscribers for one half of coupons on 

Bonds surrendered to Feb. 4, 1850, 2,762 50 

Stock to non-subscribers to Aug. 5, 1850, 31,690 00 

Stock to non-subscribers for one-half of coupons on 

Bonds surrendered to Aug. 5, 1850, 87 50 

Total 2i per cent. State Stock issued to August 5, 

1850, $1,736,727 50 

Deduct for 2} per cent, stock redeemed up to August 
5, 185J, 20,000 00 

Total 2i per cent, stock outstanding Ai^st 5, 1850, $1,716,727 50 



Preferred Five Per Cent. Canal Stock. 

The amount of one-half the principal of Bonds surrendered 
chargeable to the canal, for which 5 per cent Stock issued to sub* 
scribers of $800,000 to canal, is as follows, viz: 

Slock to subscribers prior to July 1st, 1847, $3,782,500 

Stock to subscribers to July 1st, 1848, 357,000 

Total preferred Canal Stock issued to Aug. 5, 1850> $4,079,500 



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n 



Deferred Five Per Ceni. Canal Stock. 

The amouQt of one-half the prtDcipal of Bonds surrendered 
chargeable to isanal, for which 5 per cent, stock imued to non^sulh 
9criier8 to $800,000 loan to canal, is as follows, vi2: 

Stock to noQ-sobscribers prior to July 1st, 1847,- • • • $344,000 

Stock to non-sobscribers to Jan. Ist, 1848, 106,000 

Stock to non-subsoribers to July 1st, 1848, 49,500 

Stock to non-subscribers to July 1st, 1849, 81,91K) 

Stock to non-subscribers to Feb. 4th, 1850, 54,000 

Stock to non-subscribers to Aug. 5th, 1850« 67,500 

Total stock issued to Aug. 6th, 1850,. $702,000 



Special Preferred Two <tnd One^Aalf Per Ceni. Canal Stock. 

The annount of one^half of the interest on Wabash and Erie 
Canal Bonds surrendered chargeable to canal, for whioh 3i per cent 
stock issued to subscribers of $800,000, as loan to Canal, is as fol- 
lows, viz: 

Stock to subscribers prior to July 1st, 1847, $1,106,735 

Stock to subscribers to July 1st, 1848, 98,950 

Stock to subscribers for one-half of coupons surren- 
dered to July 1st, 1848, 7,950 

Stock to subscribers for one half of coupons surren- 
dered to Aug. 5ih, 1850, 2,«25 

Total issued to Aug. 5th. 1850, $1,216,250 



Special Deferred Two and One-Zialf Per Cent. Canal Slftck. 

The amount of one-half the interest on Wabash and Erie Canal 
Bonds surrendered, chargeable to Canal, for which 2i per cent. 
Stock issued to non-subscribers to loan of §800,000 to Canal, is as 
follows, viz: 

Slock to non-subscribers prior to July 1st, 1S47,. • • • $101,212 50 

Stock to non-subscribers to January 1st, 1848, 30,587 50 

Stock to non-«nbscrib«rs to Jnly 1st, 18^18, 13,725 (K) 

IDS 



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Stock to non-sabscribersy for one-half the coupons, to 

July Ist, 1848, 1,335 00 

Stock to non-subscribers, to July 1st, 1849, 22,350 00 

Stock to oon-subscribers to Feb. 4th, 1850, 15,950 00 

Stock to noD-subscribers, foi one-half the coupons to 

Feb. 4th, 1850, 2,762 50 

Stock to non-subscribers to Aug. 5th, 1850, 19,500 00 

Stock to non-subscribers for one-half of coupons to 

Aug. 5th, 1850, 87 50 

Total stock issued to Aug. 5th, 1850, #207,400 00 



Recapiitilatunt of Stocks issued. 

5 per cent. State Stock, $4,781^00 00 

24 per cent State Stock, 1,736.727 50 

5 per cent, preferi-ed Canal Stock, 4,079,500 00 

5 per cent deferred Canal Stock, 702,000 CO 

24 per cent special preferred Canal Stock, 1,216^250 00 

24 per cent, special deferred Canal Stock, 207,400 00 

■^l*^^"— .^ II I I IWI 

Total stock issued to Auff. 5th, 1850, $12,723,377 50 

Deduct 24 per cent Sute Stock redeemed, 20,000 00 

Total ouutanding Aug. 5tht 1850, $12,703,377 50 



Interest is paid by the State on State 5 per cents, only, and that 
at a rate of 4 per cent, until 1853, after which the rate will be 5 
per cent. After 1853 the 24 per cent State Stock will bear that 
interest. 

The Canal stocks are thrown upon the Canal for their redemption, 
principal and interest, under the arrangement of the Public Debt of 
the State with the bondholders. 



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on nktm »BMr, 



The amount of InUrast due and paid to the 5tli Ailg. 1850» tmAtt 
the arrangement with the Bondholderiy is as follows: 



Jka* 9/ Dividends. 


Ammtnt. . 


Amount Paid. . 


BaitOM vnf*d. 


Julj 1st. 1847, 


$62380 00 


«88,8I0 00 


fro 00 


Jan. Ist, 1848, 


90,590 00 


90,450 00 


140 00 


July Ist. 1S4S, 


91,580 00 


91,430 00 


150 00 


Jan. 1st. 1849, 


99,090 00 


9S350 00 


94000 


July 1st. 1849, 


95,300 00 


94.740 00 


560 00 


Jan. 1st, 1850, 


953^0 00 


94,690 00 


1,130 00 


July Itt. 1850. 


97,710 00 


92,299 00 


5411 00 



DOMESTIC DEBT OF THE STATE 

Six Per Cent. Treasury Notes. 

Total amount issiMd. $1,500,000 

Redeemed — 

i 

In 1841-2, 147,700 

la 1843, 898^569 

In 1844, 200,525 

In 1845, 114,540 

In 1846, 147,370 

In 1847, - 148,510 

Jn 1848, • ..:........ 70,580 

Jo 1849 '63,740 

In 1850, 86,000 

Total amount redeemed and cancelled, $1,376,530 

Letviiig a balance of* ••••••• • • •• > • $123,470 

Fran wbicb deduct amount on hand for cancellation, 64,000 

Leaves total amount in drenlatien, $59^70 



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Five Fer Cent, Bamk Scrip, 

Total amoant issued^ ,.....«. $733,640 

Redeemed — 

In 184S, 40,350 

In 1844, 91,990 

In 1845, 72.406 

In 1846, 76,590 

In 1847, 100,330 

In 1848, 56,400 

In 1849, 56,350 

In 1850, 46,410 

Total amount redeemed and cancelled, $546,815 

Leaving a balance of- r $175,825 

From which deduct amount on hand for cancellation, 65,000 

Leaves total amount unredeemed, $11D,825 

Quarter Per Cent. Treasury Notes. 

Total amount of issue, $70,000 

Redeemed — 

In 1848,..-.. 28,750 

In 1849, • i 81,565 

In 1850, 12,165 

$72,480 

Add amount on hand for cancellation, 3,460 

Total amount redeemed, $75,940 

Etcess of notes redeemed ovei- ndtes issued, $5,940 



Former reports from this department erroneously stated the 
amount of the issue of quarter per cent Treasury notes at $100.* 
000, the Auditor being misled by the blank Register in his office. It 
appears upon examination that this sum was prepared by the Auditor 
for circulation and counters^ned by the clerk, but the last $30,000 
from No. 14,001 to No. 20,000, were never signed by the Treasurer 
•r accounted for by him, the amount not being wanted ibr the par- 



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«1 

poM for which this defcription of notes was d«sigDed» the redemption 
of Fifties of the six per cent issue. 

The sum of $70,000 only was charged to, and accounted for by 
the Treaearer of State, Geo. H. Dunn Esq., in his report of Nov. 
9Sd, 1843. He also reports that he had paid oot of these funds the 
sum of $41,250 in the redemption of SO's, leaving in his^ hands the 
sum of $38,750, which was kept in original packages, transfen^ed by 
Mr. Dunn to Mr. Mayhew, and by Mr. Mayhew to Mr. Hannah, 
and was finally destroyed by the Committee of Ways and Means m 
January, 1848. 

It will be seen that the amount redeemed already exceeds the 
amount issued and accounted for in the sum of $5,940, to which is 
to be added the probable amount still in circulation, say $2,000, making 
a total excess of $7,940, all of which is i loss to the State. It was 
found on registering the notes received during the la^ year that a 
large portion of them, although genuine,* were- duplicate numbers, 
and notes of this description have from time to time been registered 
amounting to about this excess. The attention of former officers 
was called to this subject, but they were unable to throw any light 
upon it. An examination of the matter by a comnrittee of the Leg* 
islature is respectfully suggested. 



IirrBUST ACCOUNT. 

The following sums have been paid at the State Treasury as In* 
terest on Treasury Notes: 

Interest on Treasury Notes — 

On six percents, • $968,676 04 

On five per cents, 82,263 33 

On quarter per cents, 572 54 

Total amount audited, ^ • $341,511 Bl 

Add Interest on notes on hand, 6 per cenU, 35,000 00 

Add Interest on notes on hand, 5 per cents, 25,00Q 0$ 

TotaU 1401,511 91 



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RBCAVmiiArttllf. 



Six per cents redeemed, $1^440,530 00 

JE^ve per cents redeemed* • 611,175 00 

Quarter per cents redeemed, - 75,940 00 

Total Intemt allowed, • • • 401,511 91 

Amoant paid on Domestic Debt, $2,539,156 91 

J ,.T ■ ;■■■■': 



iVoecf in Circuhtion. 

Six per cents, $59,470 00 

Five per cents, 110,835 00 

Quarter per cenu, estimated, 3,000 00 

Total principal $172,395 00 

Estimated Interest, 85,000 00 

ToUl Domestic Debt, $257,395 00 



Provision being made for the redemption of the Five per cent. 
Bank Scrip, by the Common School Fund, derived from Bank profitSf 
through the Sinking Fund Commissioners, it will mostly be absorbed 
through that channel, and will leave chaiigeable up^n thf ordinary 
tevenues of the State the amount of Six per cents, in circulation, as 
fellows: 

Amount of Principal, $59,476 

Ustimaied Interest,. « .»«,.*,,«..« 35,000 

Total, • $94,470 



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If. A MrjMmODMT te 4tetidl •€ tiM Reeelvli Mii IMitarMMMto •f 
the Tsvtowi Tnwt Fuitf taiel«4Uiff the FwiA* for the Be»eToleat !«• 
ftitmtimis. 

The raceipts and dbbursements on account of this fund during 
hb fiscal year ending October 31, 1850, have been as follows, viz: 

Receipts. 

Balance on band Oct 31, 1849, $8,518 93 

Loans refunded, • • 4,780 60 

Interest receired on Loans, 4,930 Ml 

Sales of University Lands, Principal, 129 61 

Interest on sales of Lands, 383 91 

Costs of advertising, 2 00 

ToUl, »17 ,99S 97 

JSJ«ijpeiuitfKre#* 

Loans made to borrowers, $10,074 00 

Proftssors' Salaries, 3,700 00 

Damages on Sales of Lands, 278 14 

Interest on Loans refunded,* 28 00 

Expensfls of Fund, 252 25 

Balance on band Oct 31,1850, 3,668 58 

$17,995 97 



Loam of Fund. 

The amount outstanding on loans on the 31st October, 

1849, was $62,002 05 

Lmus rdunded during the year, 4,730 60 

Leaving the sum of $57,271 45 

New loans made during the year, 10,074 00 

Making the outstanding Loans, $67,345 45 



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Under the provisions of Sec. 66, Chap. 13, Rev. Stat., it has been 
deemed advisubie to place the entire a raounl of PriDeipalaQd6ur))liia 
Interest on Loan, reserving only enough to meet the contingent ex- 
penses chargeable upon the fund. The annual accruing Interest on 
the outstanding loans will amount to $4,714 18 while the expenses 
chargeable upon the fund will no( exceed $4,000, thus making a 
gradual increase to the fund from Interest alone, independent of the 
amount due from purch^ers of University Lands. 



8ALI5B FUND. 

The iieceipts and expenditures gn account of this fund for the 
fiscal year ending Oct. 31, 1850, have been as follows, viz: 

Receipts. . 

Amount on hand Oct. 31, 1849, $5,577 44 

Princip^il of Sales of Saline Lands, 1,375 03 

Interest on Sales of Lands, 311 65 

Loans refunded, 1,804 89 

Interest on Loans, 1,488 83 

Damages on Sales of Lands, • 19 00 

$10,576 89 



Expentlitures. 

Amount distributed under act of Jan. 13, 1845, $6,708 80 

Damages on Sales of Lands, 431 08 

Expenses of Fund, 75 65 

Purchase of Saline Fund Bank Stock, 550 00 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1850, 2,811 36 

Total, $10,576 89 



.Loan Account. 

There was outstanding on loan at the close of the fis- 
cal year ending Oct. 31, 1849, the sum of $25,344 6J 

There was refunded during the year ending Oct. 31, 

1850, the sum of 1,804 89 

Leaving outstanding on loan Oct. 31 » 1850,- • • • $2 3,539 7 3 



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Salifu Fund Apportioned under act of 1845. 

Amount apportioned for 1845, $6,499 07 

Amount apportioned for 1846, 7,808 54 

Amount apportioned for 1847, 4,431 71 

Amoant apportioned for 1848, 4,418 83 

Amount apportioned for 1849, 4,905 14 

Amount apportioned for 1850, 6.107 60 

Total apportioned, • • • $34,160 89 



Dividends Undrawn. 

For the year 1847. $98 18 

For the year 1848, 78 97 

Forthevear 1849, 11 73. 

For the year 1850, 663 18 

$852 06 

Total drawn by the several counties to October 31, 

1850, $33,308 83 



BANK TAX FUND. 

The receipts and expenditures of this fund during the fiscal year 
ending Oct. 31, 1850, have been as follows, viz: 

Receipts, 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1849, $2,978 40 

Amount from banks, under sec. 15 charter, 1,073 65 

Amount of Loans reftinded, 395 00 

Interest on loans, 515 54 

Total, $4,962 59 

Expenditures. 

Amount distributed under act of Jan. 13, 1845,- • . • • • 3,583 18 

Damages on sales, 41 78 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1850, 1>337 63 

Total, $4,962 59 

1D4 



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This fund is derived from the twelve and a half cents on each 
share of Individual stock in the State Bank of Indiana, according to 
the provisions of the 15th section of the Bank Charter, and the whole 
amount received from the several Branches of the State Bank up to 

the 31st of October, 1849, was $42,015 75 

The amount received during the year ending October 

31, 1850, is as follows, viz: 

From Vincennes Branch Bank, $165 00 

From Indianapolis Branch Bank, 292 12 

From New Albany Branch Bank, 217 75 

From Bedford Branch Bank, 129 41 

From La Fayette Branch Bank, 269 37 

$1,073 65 

Total receipts from Bank to Oct. 31, 1850, $43,089 40 

Loan Account. 

The amount outstanding on loans at the close of the 

fiscal year ending Oct. 31, 1849, was $10,789 85 

The amount refunded during the fiscal year ending 
Oct. 31, 1850, is $395 00 

Total outstanding Oct. 31, 1850, $10,394 85 



BANK TAX FUND APPORTIONED VNDXK THE ACT OF 1845. 

Amount apportioned for 1845, $1,747 89 

Amount apportioned for 1846, 22,344 43 

Amount apportioned for 1847, 4,071 04 

Amount apportioned for 1848, 5,818 68 

Amount apportioned for 1849, 3,815 15 

Amount apportioned for 1850, 2^76 06 

Total apportioned, $40,673 15 

Dividends Undrawn, 

For the year 1847, $90 39 

For the year 1848, 102 20 

Forthe vear 1849, 9 12 

For the year 1850, 312 14 

513 84 

Totel drawn by the several counties to Oct. 31 , 1850, $40,159 30 



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Apportionment of Bank Tax and Saline Funds for 1850, vnder Act 

of 1845. 



!! 



CnauUa. 




Adams, 
Allen, 

Bartholooiew, 
Benton, • 
Blackfont. - 
Boone, 
Brown, 
CaiToU, • 
Cms, • 
Clark, 
Clay, - 
Clinton, - 
CrawfonL - 
DaTieai, ■ 
Beaii»oni, - 
Becator, - 
Bekalb, 
Belawan, 
Bobois, 
Elkhart, • 
Fayette, 
Floyd, . 
FoantaiB, - 
Franklin, - 
Fnlton, 
GilMon, • 
Grant, - 
Oreene, 
Hamilton, - 
Hancock, - 
Harrieon, 
Hendricks, 
Henry, - 
Howard, • 
Hontington, 
Jackson, • 
Jasper,- - 
Jay, . 
JelferM>n, 
Jennings, - 
Johnson, 
Knox, 
Kosciusko, • 

Leporte, • 
Lawrence, - 
Madison,- 
Marion, 
MarshaU,- 
Martin, 
Miami, . 
Monroe, 
Montgomery, 
Morgan, 
Hobfe, . 
Okio. . . 
Orange, - 
Owen, - 
PUke, . 
Perry, ■ 
Pike,- . 
Porter, - 
Poeey, 
PoUski, 
Pntnam, - 
Bandolph, • 
Wpley, - 
Rash, - . 
Scott, 
flkelby,- 



846 
2,464 
1,866 

185 

343 
1,634 

570 
1,765 
1,488 
2,383 
1,130 
1/S51 

936 
1,363 
2,937 
S,S04 
1,238 
1,664 
1,073 
1,844 
1,577 
2,033 
2,080 
2,878 

844 
1,704 
1,421 
1,616 
1,839 
1,305 
2,056 
2,038 
2,6?5 

903 
1,082 
1,553 

462 

874 
3,065 
1,639 
1,778 
1.743 
1,399 
1,353 

569 
2,020 
1,897 
1,815 
3,294 

853 

873 
1,668 
1,556 
2,636 
1,987 
1,236 

775 
1,643 
1,588 
2,119 

997 
1,083 

003 
1,961 

406 
3,411 
2,l3f7 
8,139 
8,515 

873 
9,360 



Jipp»rti0n4d. 



Fund 
JlpporttPiud, 



$35 94 
104 72 

79 30 
786 

14 53 

69 02 
94 61 
75 01 
63 34 

101 28 
48 03 

70 17 
30 35 
57 93 

134 82 
93 67 
53 19 
70 73 
45 60 
78 37 

67 03 

86 40 
88 40 

122 31 

35 87 
72 48 
60 39 

68 68 
78 16 
55 46 

87 38 
86 61 

111 99 
38 33 
45 98 
66 00 
19 53 
37 14 

131 11 

69 66 
75 56 
74 08 
59 46 
57 46 
24 18 
85 85 

80 63 
77 14 

140 00 

36 31 

37 10 

70 89 

66 13 
111 60 

84 45 
53 53 
33 94 
69 83 

67 49 
90 06 
43 37 
43 43 

38 38 
84 19 
17 34 

103 47 
90 83 
90 18 

106 89 
37 10 

100 30 



16 98 

49 38 

37 38 
3 70 
684 

38 48 
11 58 

35 30 

29 76 

47 66 

23 60 
33 03 
18 58 

27 26 
58 74 
44 08 
94 56 

33 28 
21 46 

36 88 

31 54 

40 66 

41 60 

57 56 

16 88 

34 08 

28 43 

33 38 

36 79 
86 10 
41 18 
40 76 
S3 70 

18 04 
21 64 
3106 

924 

17 48 
61 70 

32 78 

35 56 

34 88 
27 98 
27 04 
11 38 
40 40 

37 94 

36 30 
65 88 
17 04 

17 46 

33 36 

31 12 

58 53 

39 74 

24 718 
15 50 

32 88 
3176 

48 38 

19 94 

30 44 

18 06 
39 68 

8 16 
48 28 
48 74 
43 44 

50 30 
17 46 
47 90 



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ApportionmeTit of Bank Tax and Saline Fvndsfor 1850, under Act 
of 1845. — Continued. 



C^untiet. 



PollM. 



Saline Fund Ap 
portiantd. 



Bank Tax Fumd 
JlppTtionad, 



Spencer, 
Steuben, • 
St. Joseph, • 
Sullivan, • 
SwiUerland, 
Tippecanoe, 
Tipton, - 
Union, 

Vanderburgh, ' 
Vermillion, 
Vigo, . . 
l^abash, • 
Warren, 
Warrick, - • 
Washington, 
Wayne, 
Wells. - 
White, - . 
Whitley, 

ToUl, 



8878 
2100 

35 30 
S7 34 

36 7S 
60 58 

886 
80 54 
35 06 
89 58 
44 68 

37 84 

84 68 

85 40 
48 58 
8136 
14 48 
13 18 
18 94 



143,803 



•6,1(V7 60 



•8,876 06 



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COUMTT SEMINARY FUiND DERIVED FROM MILITIA FINES. 

The amount of this fund on hand Oct. 31, 1849, $445 40 

No farther distribution during 1850. 



SURPLUS REVENUE FUND. 

The receipts and disbursements of this fund during the fiscal year 
ending Oct. 31, 1850, are as follows, to- wit: 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1850, $340 13 

Amount of Loans refunded, 1,382 45 

Amount of Interest on Loans, 515 39 

Total, $ 2,137 97 

Expenditures, 

Amount of Loan, $500 00 

Amount distributed to De Kalb county, • • 114 01 

Amount distributed to Wells county, 114 00 

Amount distributed to Lake county, .......•• 114 01 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1850, 1,295 95 

Total, $ 2,137 97 

LOANS OF SURPLUS REVENUE FUND. 

Amount outstanding on Loan at the close of the finan- 
cial year ending Oct. 31, 1849, $5,429 45 

Amount refunded during the year ending October 31, 

1850, 1,282 45 

Balance, $4,147 00 

Amount reloaned during the year, 500 00 

Total outstanding on Loan Oct. 31, 1850, $4,647 00 



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RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF DBKAIA OOUNTV. 

Receipts. 

Balance due DeKalb county Oct. 31, 1849, $114 01 

Amount of one-third of loans refunded for 1S50,- • • • 260 81 

Amount of one-third of interest on loans for ISSO,- • 171 79 

Total, $546 61 



Disbursements. 

Amount distributed to DeKalb county, $114 01 

Balance due to DeKalb connty Oct. 31, 1850, $432 60 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMBNtS ON ACCOUNT OP WELLS COUNTY. 

Receipts. 

Balance due to Wells county Oct. 31. 1849, $114 00 

Amount of one- third of loans refunded for 1850,* • . • 260 82 

Amount of one-third of interest on loans for 1850,* • 171 80 

Total, $546 62 

DiJmrsements. 

Amount distributed to Wells county, $114 00 

Balance due Wells county Oct. 31, 1850, $432 62 



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HKWm ATO DMBUBSEmnrW ON ACCOUNT OP LAKE COUNTY. 

Receipts. 

Balance doe to Lake county Oct 31, 1849, H U oi 

Amoont of one-third of loans refunded for 1850,. . . . sJJ SJ 

Amoont of one-third of mterest on loans for 1850,. . Ul 80 

^«'^' ^ 

DMursements. 

Amount distributed to Lake county, $114 01 

Balance due to Lake county Oct. 31, 1850, ^433 q2 

coiraKassioifAi. TowHeHip fuhd. 

The receipts and disbursements of this Fund during the fiscal year 
ending Oct. 31, 1850, are as follows, to-wit : 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1849, ^3^4 59 

Amount of loans refunded, 73 00 

Amount of Interest on loans, 35 46 



Total,. 



$373 15 



Expendihcres. 

Amount of Loans during 1860, ^m on 

Amount of Interest distributed in 1850, 57 30 

Balance of Principal and Interest on hand October 31, 

^^^' 62 56 

'^^^•'^ $373 15 



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EVCBIPT8 AXD mSBURSEMBNTS OF CONGEBSftlOHAL TOWNBUir ¥VKJ> Oil 
ACCOUNT OF TOWNSHIP NO. lO, RANGE NO. 13, IN EIPLET COUNTY. 

Receipts. 

Balance of interest due township Oct. 31, 1849,- • • $26 98 

Proportion of $35 46 interest due township, 24 32 

Amount overpaid, 6 00 

Total, $57 30 



Disbursements. 
Amount distributed to township during 1850, $57 30 



RECSIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF CONGRESSIONAL TOWNSHIP FUND ON 
ACCOUNT OF TOWNSHIP NO. 6, RANGE NO. 5, WEST, IN GREENE COUNTY. 

Receipts. 

Balance of interest due township Oct. 31, 1849,- • • $31 41 

Proportion of $35 46 interest due township, 11 14 

Total due township Oct. 31, 1850, $42 55 

Disbursements. 
None during 1850. 

The School Funds of two townships only in the entire State are 
deposited with the State Treasurer, an anomaly in the management 
of funds of this ilescription for which it would be hard to find a 
plausible reason. Unless a general system of the kind is. adopted, 
of which there is no probability, it would seem to be proper to return 
these funds to the control and management of the proper officers of 
the respective counties, and it is respectfully recommended that such 
a course should be ordered by the Legislature. An act or resolution 
directing the Auditor of State to pass over to the Treasurers of 
Ripley and Greene counties the several securities belonging to each, 
would be sufficient to relieve the State Treasury from the charge of 
these local funds, and subject them to the general laws of the State. 



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$96 56 
96 56 
96 56 
96 56 
32 13 


$418 37 



33 



THKBB PBR CBHT. FUND. 

Balance in Treasury Oct. 31, 1850, »418 37 



This balance belongs to the following counties, viz : 

To HuDtington county, 

To Steuben county, 

To Vanderburgh county, 

To Whitley county, 

Balance undivided, 

Total , 



No moneys have been received from the General Government on 
account of this fund since Feb. 1844, although a large amount has 
necessarily accumulated. It is due to the counties and individuals 
who have claims for monev or labor upon the fund, that some steps 
should be taken to adjust tfie matter, and obtain from the National 
Treasury the quota to which Indiana is justly entitled. 



COMMOlf SCHOOL FUND DBRIVBD FROM SINKING FUND. 

Amount received by State of this Fund to October 31, 

1849 $596,322 53 

Amount received, in 5 per cent. Bank Scrip and in- 
terest, to Oct. 31, 1850, 55,863 00 

Total $652,185 53 



This is on interest at the rate of six per cent, until refunded by 
the Treasury. 



INDIANAPOLIS FUND. 

Loans of Indianapolis Fund, 

Balance of outstanding loans Oct. 31, 1849, $483 50 

Nothing received nor re-Toaned to Oct. 31, 1850. 

Balance ouUtanding Oct. 31, 1850, $ 483 50 

1D5 



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Salei of Lois in Indianapdu. 

Balance of principal duo from purchasers of Lots in ' 

Indianapolis Oct. 31, 1849, $1,443 75 

Amount of sales during fiscal year, 1,125 00 

Total...... ^^568 75 

Amount paid by purchasers during 185Q, 281 25 

Balance of principal due Oct. 31, 1850, $2,287 50 



TRBASURY FUND. 

Amount of Principal outstanding Oct. 31, 1850, $3,631 92 

Amount of Interest on Loans received, 35 46 



FUND PROM BSTATBi WITH0I7T KHOWM nSEBS. 

Balance in Treasury Oct. 31, 1849, $3,025 89 

Amount received during 1850, 200 89 

Total, $3,226 78 

Amount refunded in 1850, 292 81 

Balance in Treasury Oct. 31, 1850, $2,933 97 



FUND FOR HOSPITAL FOR THB INSANE. 

Receipts. 

Amount received of this fund to Oct 31, 1849, $69,369 33 

Received during 1850, 32,501 33 

Total receipts to Oct. 31, 1850, $101,870 66 



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Expenditures. 

Amount expended to Oct. 31, 1849, $69,369 33 

Amount expended during 1850, 32,501 33 

Total expenditures to Oct 31, 1850, »101,870 66 



PVlfD FOR DBAF AKD DUMB AflYLVM. 

Receipts. 

Amount of Receipts to Oct. 31, 1849, $6C,068 75 

Amount received during 1850, j 27,979 92 

Total receipts to Oct. 31, 1850, $8 8,048 67 



Expenditures. 

Amount expended to Oct. 31, 1849, $60,069 66 

Amount expended during 1850, 27,979 92 

Total expenditures to Oct. 31, 1850, $88,049 58 

Amount overdrawn to Oct. 31, 1850, 91 



EDUCATION OF THK BLUfD. 

Receipts. 

Amount received up to Oct. 31, 1849, $32,028 70 

Amount received during 1850, 11,781 09 

Total receipts to Oct. 31, 1850, $43,809 79 



EapeTiditures. 

Amount expended to Oct. 31 , 1849, $32,028 70 

Amount expended during 1850, 11,781 09 

Total expenditures to Oct. 31, 1850, $43,809 79 



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y. IlfTERNAIi IMPROVEMEIVTS. 



The works coustituting the Interoal ImprovemeDt system, together 
with the amounts they have respectively cost up to the 31st of Octo- 
ber, 1850, under the classification of works abandoned by the State, 
works surrendered to companies, and works retained by the State, 
are as follows, viz: 

WORKS ABANDONED BY THE STATE. 

Jeffersonville and Crawfordsville road, costing, $339,183 78 

Lafayette and Indianapolis road, costing, 73,142 87 

Wabash Rapids, 14,288 42 

Total expended to Oct. 31, 1850, $426,615 07 



WORKS SURRENDERED TO COMPANIES. 

White Water Canal. 

The excess of expenditures over receipts on account 
of this work up to date of surrender to a company 
by an act approved January 20, 1842, is $1,092,175 13 



MADISON AND INDIANAPOLIS RAIL ROAD. 

The whole amount expended on this work prior to 

Nov. 1, 1845, $1,624,603 05 

Expended for new stock during the year 1849, 5,363 35 

Expended for new stock during the year 1850, 8,U12 33 

Total expenditures to Oct. 31, 1850, $1,637,978 73 



Receipts. 

Total receipts to Oct. 31, 1849, $77,071 37 

Dividendson stock in 1850, 1,129 50 

Total, $78,200 87 

Excess of expenditures over receipts to Oct. 31, 1850, $1^59,777 86 



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state's stock in THX MADISON AND INDIANAPOUS RAIL ROAD. 

Statement of Stock owned by the State of Indiana in the Madison and 
Indianapolis Rail Road Company as it accumulated^ as reported 
by W. N. Jackson^ Secretary. 

1843, Jane, Received of CommissioDers, $4,638 04 

1844, Jan., Received back freight, 281 07 

1844, Feb. 1, Received Dividend No. 1, 294 83 

1844, Oct- 1, Received back freights, 60 75 

1844, Oct. 1, Received Rent of Road (1843,) 1,152 04 

1845, Feb. 1, Received Dividend No. 2, 610 54 

1845, Feb. 1, Received Rent of Road, (1844,) 1,152 04 

1846, Feb. 1, Received Dividend No. 3, 818 93 

1846, Feb. 1, Received Rent of Road, (1845,) 1,152 04 

1846, Aug. 1, Received Special Dividend, 573 25 

1846, Aug. 1, Received Dividend No. 4, 429 34 

1847, Feb. 1, Received Dividend No. 5, 781 40 

1847, Feb. 1, Received Rent of Road, (1846,) 1,152 04 

1847, Aug. 1, Received Dividend No. 6, 916 74 

18 i8, Feb. 1, Received Dividend No. 7, 980 00 

1848, Feb. 1, Received Rent of Road, (1847,) 1,152 04 

1849, Jan. 29, 107 shares new stock, 5,350 00 

1849, Jan. 29, Received Rent of Road, (1848,) 1,152 04 

1849, Jan. 29, Frac. of Stock, 2 87 

1849, March 15, 130 shares new stock, (bonus,) 6,500 00 

1849, March 15, 1st instalment on 130 shares new 

stock, at $10 per share, 1,300 00 

1850, Jan. 25, 2d inst. on same, at $20 per share,- • • 2,600 00 
1850, Jan. 25, Rent of Road, (1849,) 1,150 00 

$34,200 00 
March 8, 1849, 106 shares stock sold by State of In- 
diana, 5,350 00 

Stock owned Nov. 22, 1850, 577 shares, $28,850 00 



On the 25th January 1851 there will be due the company from the 
State the sum of $2,600, being an instalment on new stock, and 
which will in part be met by the January Dividend, and Rent of 
the Road for 1850, making tlie entire amount of stock at that date 
$31,500. 



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WABASH AND SBIB CANAL EAST OP TIPPBOANOS. 

Expenditures under the State. 

The total amount expended on this work prior to July 
1, 1847, at which time it was transferred to Trus- 
tees,is $3,055,268 97 



Receipts by Stale. 

Total amount of receipts by the State prior to July 1, 

1847, 1,174,611 83 

Excess of Expenditures over receipts up to July 1, 

1847, $1,880,657 14 



WABASn AND BBIE CANAL WEST OF TIPPBCANOB. 

Expenditures under the State. 

The total amount expended on this work prior to July 
1, 1847, at which time it was transferred to Trus- 
tees, is $1,245,290 54 

Receipts by State. 

The total amount of receipts by State prior to July 1, 

1847, 526,847 61 

Excess of expenditures over receipts up to July 1, 

1847, $718,442 93 



EEL BIVEB CROSS-CUT CANAL. 

Total cost of this work prior to July i, 1847, at which 
time it was transferred to Trustees, (there being no 
receipts,) amounts to $436,18% 



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sovTHSKir Divnioif or cbntral canai.. 

The total cost of this work prior to July 1, 1847, at 
which time it was transferred to Trustees, (no re- 
ceipts,) amouDts to $575,646 49 



WABA8H AND OHIO CANAL. 

The total amount of expenditures under this head, 
being mostly for expenses of selecting lands for ex- 
tension of Wabash and Erie Canal west to the 
Ohio river, is $9,169 94 



SXCAnTVLATION OP EXPENBITVRES AND SBCEIPTS OF WABASH AND 
BRIE CANAL, UNDER THE STATE. 

Expenditures. 

The total cost of the Wabash and Erie Canal from the line di- 
yiding the States of Ohio and Indiana to the Ohio river, at Evans- 
ville, under the several subdivisions, prior to July 1, 1847, at which 
time it was surrendered to Trustees, is as follows, viz: 

Wabash and Erie Canal East of Tippecanoe, $3,055,268 97 

Wabash and Erie Canal West of Tippecanoe, 1,245,290 54 

Eel river Cross Cut Canal, 436,189 88 

Southern Division of Central Canal, 575,646 49 

WalMish and Ohio Canal, 9,169 94 

Total cost prior to July 1, 1847, $5,321,565 82 



Receipts. 

The amounts received from this work during the same period* are 
as follows, viz: 

Wabash and Erie Canal east of Tippecanoe, $1,174,611 83 

Wabash and Erie Canal west of Tippecanoe, 526,847 61 

Total receipts prior to July 1, 1847 $1,701,459 44 

Excess of expenditures over receipts, $3,620,106 38 

ToUl, { $5321,565 82 



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WABA8H AND BRIB CANAL FROM STATB UNB DIVIDING OHIO AND INDI- 
ANA TO THE OHIO RIVER, UNDER, 8UPERINTBNDBNCB OF TRUSTEES. 

REPORT No. 6. 

Receipts. 

There was remaining in the hands of Trustees on 1st 
of April, 1849, as per report No. 4 the sum of. • • • $201,849 26 

The Receipts by Trustees, for the six months ending 
Oct. 1st, 1849, were as follows, viz: 

From Tolls and Water Rents No. 7498, 101,948 74 

From Lands East and West of Tippecanoe No. 7499, 2,870 00 

From Lands in Vincennes District No. 7600, 25,194 09 

From Interest and Exchange No. 7501, 12,223 57 

From Subscription of Bondholders No. 7502. 153,840 00 

Total, $497,925 64 



Expendituj^'es. 

The Expenditures by Trustees for the same period were as follows, 
viz: 

For General Expenses, Warrant No. 5104. $8,872 61 

For Ordinary Repairs of Canal No. 5105, 24,031 72 

For Extraordinary Repairs No. 5106, 10,640 48 

For Expenses of Superintendence No. 5107, 2,933 95 

For Expenses of Land Office East and West of 

Tippecanoe No. 5108, 3,346 31 

For Expenses of Collection No. 5109, 2,360 73 

For Construction of Canal from Coal Creek to Terre- 

Haute No. 5110, 50,532 98 

For Construction of Canal from Terre-Haute to Point 

Commerce No. 5111, 100,001 11 

For Construction of Canal from Point Commerce to 

Newbury No. 5112, 63,500 88 

For Construction of Canal from Newbury to Mays- 

vilie No. 5113, 3,032 40 

For Construction of Canal South of Maysville No. 

5114, 15,845 20 

For Expenses of Surveys No. 5115, 7,431 37 

For Expenses of Land Office, Vincennes District, No. 

5116 735 14 



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For Damages and Water Power No. 51 17, 100 00 

For Interest on advance of $800,000 No. 5118, 12,609 84 

Balance on hand Oct. 1st, 1849, 191,950 92 

Total, $497,925 64 



REPORT No. 6. 

Receipts. 

There was remaining in the hands of Trustees on 1st 

October, 1849, as per Report No. 5 the sum of- • • $191,950 92 



The Receipts by Trustees for the six months ending April 1st, 
1 850, were as follows, viz: 

From Tolls and Water Rents No. 7503, 39,844 13 

From Lands East and West of Tippecanoe No. 7504 26,506 50 

From Lands in Vincennes District No. 7505, 27,637 72 

From Interest and Exchange No. 7507, 744 60 

From Subscription of Bondholders No. 7508, 251,310 00 

Total, $537,993 87 



Expenditures. 

The Expenditures by Trustees for the same period were as fol- 
lows, viz: 

For General Expenses Warrant No. 5119, 7,616 73 

For Ordinary Repairs No. 5120, 14,517 96 

For Extraordinary Repairs No. 5121, 14,644 66 

For Expenses of Superintendence No. 5122, 2,958 17 

For Expenses of Land Office East and West of Tip- 
pecanoe No. 5123, 566 87 

For Expenses of Collection No. 5124, 2,438 43 " 

For Construction of Canal from Coal Creek to Terre- 

Haute No. 5125, ? 20,626 39 

For Construction of Canal from Terre-Haute to Point 

Commerce No. 5126, 58,195 72 

For Construction of Canal from Point Commerce to 

Newbury No. 5127, 32,169 59 

« 

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49 

For Coastruction of Canal from Newbury to Mays- 

viUe No. 5128, •' 29,685 75 

For Construction of Canal South of Maysville No. 

5129, 28,651 48 

For Expenses of Surveys No. 5130, 6,631 10 

For Expenses of Land OflSce in Vincennes District 

No. 5131, 454 40 

For Damages and Water Power No. 5132, 3,380 50 

For Interest on Subscription of |800,000 No. 5133, 16,521 09 

Balance on hand April 1st, 1850, 298,935 03 

Total, $537,993 87 



REPORT No. 7. 

Receipts. 

There was remaining in the hands of Trustees on 1st 

April, 1850, as per Report No. 6 the sum of $298,935 03 



The Receipts by Trustees for the six months ending Oct 1st, 
1850, were as follows, viz : 

From Tolls and Water Rents No. 7509, 110,680 14 

From Lands East and West of Tippecanoe No. 7510, 27^8 82 

From Lands in Vincennes District No. 7511, 22,590 75 

From Interest and Exchange No. 7512, 12,146 64 

From Subscription of Bondholdera No. 7513, 2,700 00 

From Overcharge for Disbursements No. 7514, 553 00 

Total, $474,864 38 



Expenditures. 

The Expenditures by Trustees for the same period were as fol- 
lows, viz: 

For General Expenses Warrant No. 5134, $12,186 31 

For Ordinary Repairs No. 5135, 16,322 06 

For Extraordinary Repairs No. 5136, 9,970 15 

For expenses of superintendence, No. 5137, $3,257 05 

For expenses of Land Office east and west of Tippe- 

canoe, No. 5138, 279 50 

For expenses of collection, No. 5139, ; 2,743 43 



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43 

For construction of Canal from Coal Creek to Terre 

Haute, No. 5140, 4,475 01 

For construction of Canal from Terre Haute to Point 

Commerce, No. 5141, 26,016 24 

For construction of Canal from Point Commerce to 

Newbury, No. 5142, 24,539 40 

For construction of Canal from Newbury to Mays- 

ville, No. 5143, 38,832 10 

For construction of Canal south of Maysville, No. 

5144, 106,947 58 

For expenses of Surveys, No. 5145, 6,334 01 

For expenses of Land Office in Vincennes district. No. 

5146, ^ 472 70 

For damages and water power. No. 5147, 3,300 00 

For interest on subscription of $800,000, No. 5148,. 24,278 75 
Balance on hand Oct. 1st, 1850, 194,910 09 

Total, $474,864 38 



Grand total of Receipts and expenditures on account of Wabash 
and Erie Canal from its commencement to Oct. 1st, 1850, viz: 

Expendiiures. 

Total by State to surrender to Trustees, $5,321,565 82 

Total by Trustees to Oct. Isi, 1847, 7,420 77 

Total by Trustees to April 1st, 1848, 128,848 20 

Total by Trustees to Oct. 1st, 1848, 225,463 42 

Total by Trustees to April 1st, 1849, 225,642 57 

Total by Trustees to Oct. 1st, 1849, 305,974 72 

Total by Trustees to April 1st, 1850, 239,058 84 

Total by Trustees to Oct. 1st, 1850, 279,954 29 

Total cost to Oct. 1st, 1850, $6,733,928 63 



Receipts. 

Total by State to surrender to Trustees, $1,701,459 44 

Tota4 by Trustees to Oct. Ist, 1847, 302,856 73 

Total by Trustees to April Ist, 1848, 235,056 51 

Total by Trustees to Oct. 1st, 1848, 150,550 44 

Total by Trustees to April 1st, 1849, 100,760 54 

Total by Trustees to Oct. 1st, 1849, 396,076 38 



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Total by Trusleos to April Ist, 1850, 346,042 95 

Total by Trustees to Oct. 1st, 1850, 175,929 35 

Total receipts from all sources to Oct. 1st, 1850,. $3,308,732 34 
Deduct subscription of bondholders, to be refunded 

from revenues of Canal, 816,610 63 

Total net receipts, $2,492,121 71 

Total expenditures, 6,733,928 63 

Grand total of expenditures over receipts from com- 
mencement to Oct. 1st, 1850, $4,241,806 92 



TOLLS AND WATER RENTS OF WABASH AND ERIE CANAL. 

The following is the amount of Tolls and Water Rents received 
at each Toll Collector's office on the Wabash and Erie Canal, from 
October 1st, 1849, to October 1st, 1850, viz: 

Fort Wayne office, for October, 1849, $9,346 98 

Fort Wayne office, for November, 1849, 7,960 73 

Fort Wayne office, for December, 1849, 438 84 

Fort Wayne office, for January, 1850, 000 00 

Fort Wayne office, for February, 1850, 000 00 

Fort Wayne office, for March, 1850, 466 44 

Fort Wayne office, for April, 1850, 4,612 13 

Fort Wayne office, for Mav, 1850, 4,795 00 

Fort Wayne office, for June, 1850, 4,518 95 

Fort Wayne office, for Julv, 1850, 4,182 96 

Fort Wayne office, for August, 1850, 8,243 28 

Fort Wayne office, for September, 1850, 11,238 70 

Total, $55,804 01 



Lagro office, for October, 1849, $1,776 75 

Lagro office, for November, 1849, 889 16 

Logro office, for December, 1849, 366 42 

Lagro office, for January, 1850, 000 00 

Lagro office, for February, 1850, 000 00 

Lagro office, for March, 1850, 763 82 

Lagro office, for April, 1850, 1,075 01 

Lagro office, for May, 1850, 1,142 92 

Lagro office, for June, 1850, 897 10 

Lagro office, for July, 1850, 133 81 



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Liigro office, for August, 1850, 1,587 53 

Lagro office, for JSepteinber, 1850, 1,878 iiSi 

Total, $10,510 74 



Logansporl office, for October, 1849, $1,151 34 

Logansporl office, for November, 1849, 1,090 21 

Logansporl office, for December, 1849, 33 69 

Logansporl office, for January, 1850, 0,000 00 

Logansj>orl office, for February, 1850, 0,000 00 

Logansporl office, for March, 1850, 1,049 24 

Logansporl office, for April, 1S50, 2,101 23 

Logansporl office, for May, 1850, 1,768 15 

Logansporl office, for June, 1050, 1,591 62 

Logansporl office, for July, 1850, 501 83 

Logansporl office, for August, 1850, 3,035 72 

Logansporl office, for September, 1850, 2,485 14 

Total, $15,807 17 



Lafayette office, for October, 1849, $4,425 53 

Lafayette office, for November, 1849, 4^211 60 

Lafayette office, for December, 1849, 660 34 

Lafayette office, for January, 1850, 000 00 

Lafayette office, for February, 1850, 000 00 

Lafayette office, for March, 1850, 1,586 36 

Lafayelie office, for April, 1850, 10,127 31 

Lafayette office, for May, 1850, 7,878 22 

Lafayette office, for June, 1850, 7,713 80 

Lafayette office, for July, 1850, 3,793 43 

Lafayette office, for August, 1850, 6,450 25 

Lafayette office, for September, 1850, 7,056 18 

Total,. $53,903 02 



Covington office, for October, 1849, $2,394 38 

Corington office, for November, 1849, 1,255 29 

Coviogton office, for December, 1849, 25 80 

Covington office, for January, 1850, 000 00 

Covington office, for February, 1850, 000 00 

Covington office, for March, 1850, 000 00 

Covington office, for April, 1850, 1,918 67 



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Covington office, for May, 1850, 1 ,267 71 

Covington office, for June, 1850, 1,322 81 

Covington office, for July, 1850, 1,679 09 

Covington office, for August, 1850, 1,203 75 

Covington office, for September, 1850, 1,891 68 

Total, $12,959 18 



Terre Haute office, for July, 1850, $421 37 

Terre Haute office, for August, 1850, 503 10 

Terre Haute office, for September, 1850, 384 06 

Total, $1,308 53 



WABASH AND ERIE CANAL SCRIP EAST OF TIPPECANOE. 

The amount of Canal Land Scrip East, issued by the Auditor and 
Treasurer of State, with the dates of the respective issues, is as 
follows, viz: 

1842, May 7, from No. 1 to No. 10,268, $51,340 00 

1843, May 20, from No. 10,269, to No. 11,269, 5,005 00 

1843, May 25, from No. 11,269, to No. 15,262, 19,965 00 

1843, Dec. 28, from No. 15,262, to No. 20,262, 25,000 00 

1844, May 4, from No. 20,262 to No. 24,262, 20,000 00 

1844, Sept. 4, from No. 24,262 to No. 28,262, 20,000 00 

1844, Oct. 19, from No. 28,262 to No. 34,262, 30,000 00 

1845, April 25, from No. 34,262 to No. 44,262, 50,000 00 

1845, July 11, from No. 44,262 to No. 50,262, 30,000 00 

1845, Aug. 22, from No. 50,262 to No. 54,262, 20,000 00 

1846, Feb. 11, from No. 54,262 to No. 61,262, 35,000 00 

Total issued by Auditor and Treasurer, $306,310 00 

Add to the foregoing the following amounts issued by 
Commissioners of Wabash and Erie Canal, a Regis- 
ter of which was filed in this office, viz : 

Amount issued by J. L. Williams, as per certificates 

No. 1 to No. 7,097, 82,198 04 

Amount issued by S. Fisher, as per certificates No. 

7,098 to No. 7,214, 7,711 01 

Total amount, $396,219 05 



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There have been redeemed and cancelled at the Treasury the fol- 
lowing sums, viz: 

1843, Sept. 19, as per Warrant No. 6,478, $33,452 11 

1843, Sept. 19, as per Warrant No. 6,490, 31,419 68 

1844, Jan. 12, as per Warrant No. 6,706, 44,017 76 

1844, Sept. 10, as per Warrant No. 7,914, 100 00 

1846, March 6, as per Warrant No. 793, 90,537 92 

1847, Jan. 23, as per Warrant No. 1,370, 90,464 85 

1848, Feb. 22, as per Warrant No. 2,692, 14,165 45 

1849, Jan. 22, as per Warrant No. 3,541, 41,667 06 

1850, Jan. 15, as per Warrant No. 4,252, 25,453 01 

Total redeemed and cancelled, $371,277 84 

Amount in Treasury not cancelled, 12,999 88 

Total amount redeemed, $384,277 72 

Total amount issued, 396,219 05 

Leaving total amount outstanding, $11,941 33 



WABASH AlfD ERIE CANAL SCRIP, WEST. 

"Scrip Issued, 
Total amount of Scrip issued, $819,980 



Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 



Scrip Redeemed. 

n 1843, $29,255 

n 1844, 135,275 

Q 1845, 91,840 

n 1846, 259,415 

n 1847, 191,160 

n 1848, 31,425 

nl849, 36,985 

n 1850, 15,845 



Total amount redeemed and cancelled, ^$791,190 

Amount in Treasury not cancelled, ' 22,490 

Total amount redeemed, $813,680 

Leaving total amount outstanding Oct 31, 1850,. . . . $6^300 



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48 
WORKS RETAINED BY THE STATE. 

NEW ALBANY AND VINCE.VNES ROAD. 

Expert Hi ures. 

Amount of expenditures up to Oct. 31, 1819, $707 02:2 48 

The amount expended during the financial year ending 

Oct. 31, 1850, as reported to this Office, are as foU 

lows, viz : 

Amount paid for construction, 3,196 02 

Amount paid for repairs, 6,193 61 

Amount paid for incidental expenses, 2,328 85 

Damages, 1 00 

Total cost of work to Oct. 31, 1850, $718,741 .96 



Receipts, 

Amount of rectipts up to Oct. 31, 1849, $37,827 35 

Amount of tolls received during financial year ending 

Oct. 31, 1850, is ' 12,621 97 

Total receipts from this work to Oct. 31, 1850.. • • $50,449 3"2 
Excess of expenditures over receipts, 668,292 64 

Total, $ 718,741 96 

The foregoing statement embraces the Receipts and Expenditures 
from May, 1849, to Oct. 31, 1850, a period of nearly one and a half 
years. The Tolls only are appropriated to the construction, repairs, 
and contingent expenses of the work. 



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IfOSTHBBII MVCBIOM OW OBITBAIi CANAL. 

The amount expended on this work up ta Oct 31, 
1849, is $884,444 48 

The amount expended during the year ending October 
31, 1850, is as follows, viz: 

Amount of repairs, 2,548 88 

Amount of incideiital expeitees,^ 1,005 56 

Total cost of work to Oct. 31, 1850, $887,998 93 



Receipts. 



t 



The amount of r^eipts for water rents to October 31, 

1849, is $15,531 71 

The amount of water rents during the year ending 

Oct. 31 1850, is 2,165 74 

Total receipts from this work to Oct. 31, 1850,- • • $17,697 45 

The excess of expenditures over receipts is 870,301 47 

Total, $887,998 92 



In pursuance of an Act approved January, 1850, after notice 
given, that portion of the canal lying north of Morgan county was 
ofiered for sale by the Governor and Auditor to the highest bidder, 
at the capital on the 16th November inst., and was struck off to 
Messrs. George G. Shoup, James Rariden and John S. Newman for 
the sum of $2,435. The sale is referred by the officers aforesaid 
to the Legislature for their confirmation, if deemed expedient. 



17D 



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The amount expanded on this work to Oct. 31 » 1850« 

i, v. $ieO.T08 87 

There have been no receipts. 



The only portion of this work available is the water power at the 
Koiihport Feeder Dan), which, by an Act of the Legislature, wae 
eonveyed tt> Noble county for School purposes. 



▼I. GENERAL REMARKS. 

The exhibit of Receipts and Expenditures for the fiscal year ending 
Oct. 31st, 1850, shows the following summary: 

Sdanoe in Treasury Nov. 1, 1849, ' . . $438,941 19 

Total amount of receipts from Nov. 1st, 1849, to Oct. 
31, 1950, inclusive, 1,433,443 78 

Total receipts, $1,861,383 97 

Amount of VVarrants drawa upon the Treasury for 

I period, 1,513,634 04 



Balance in Treasury, Oct. 31st, 1850, $347,849 93 



This however is but an apparent balance, there being really a 
49iall deficiency at the end of the financial year. 

The receipts and expenditures of the Wubash and Erie Canal 
Trustees, under the act for the adjustment of the State debt, are 
lemi-annually reported to this office, and the receipts credited, and 
expenditures chained, in the general financial account, as if actually 
paid into the Treasury. The account is rendered to the Is; October, 
1850, at which time there was an excess of receipts to the credit of 
the trustees, amounting to $194,910 09, and which is to be deducted 
from the balance stated above. The amount of Treasury notes, and 
of Wabash and Erie Canal Scrip, in the Treasury for cancellation, 
and the indebtedness of the State to the State Bank to meet the July 
interest and the expenses of the Constitutional Convention, are also 
to be charged against the Treasury. 

The true condition of the Treasury at the period named will be 
found not to vary materially from the following statement: 



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SI 

Balance in Treasury to credit of W. & E. canal Trns- 

toes. $194^10 Od 

TTraaBurv notes on hand for cancellation, 193,460 00 

W. &. E. Canal Scrip for cancellation, 39,100 91 

Total charges on the Treasury, $436,471 00 

Deduct balance above stated, 347^849 93 

Leaving a deficeincy in the Treasury at the clo^e of 

the fiscal year of about $78,621 07 



The ordinary expenditures for the support of the State Government 
<l«riog the year have been as follows: 

ORDIlfART EZPIDfSBS. 

Oiiraccount of Probate Judges, 4,795 00 

On account of Supreme and Circuit Judge?, 14,910 81 

On account of State House, 588 71 

On account of Specific Appropriations, 3,114 39 

On account of Public Printing, Paper and Binding,* • 11 3^3 49 

On account of Legislative Expenses, 31,010 64 

On account of State Library, 964 81 

On account of The Militia, 539 17 

On account of Stationery and Fuel, 3,453 13 

On account of Executive Department, 5,877 93 

On account of Contingent Fund, to-wit: 

To Jas. Hughes, Att'y in the McGinley case, $400 00 

To Walpole &; Queries, Attorneys *in the 

McGinley case, * 400 00 

To Saml. H. Buskirk, arbitrator, 105 75 

Transcript of McGinley case, 95 50 

Poeiage account, 373 38 

Sundry allowances by Gov. Wright. 491 67 

1,765 30 

On account of Governor's Circle, 635 34 

On accuuot <^ Governor's House, 1,309 56 

On acQoutit of Transpt. of Public Arms,* 79 75 

On account of State's Prison, 3,606 63 

On account of Distributing Laws and JournaU» 551 54 

Total, $88,615 10 

This amount is swollen over former expenditures by an unusual 

ckaige upoB the contingent Fund, by repairs for the Governor's 



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53 

House commenced in 1849, and by the expense of Printing Paper 
for the convention, ^hich under the ?aw was chargeable to the Gen- 
eral Fund. Deducting these extraordinary items, the expenses of the 
State Government will be found to have been about $80,0U0, which, 
for a population of a million of inhabitants, will compare favorably 
with any State in the union, the expense /7er capita being but eight 
cents for each individual. 

The ordinary expenditures for the current year may be estimated 
«9 follows: 

On account of the Legislature, $31,000 00 

On account of the Judiciary, 17,000 00 

On account of Executive Officers, 6,5'JO 00 

On account of Public Piinting and Binding, 7,000 00 

On account of Probate Judges, 5,000 00 

On account of Specific Appropriations, 3,000 00 

On account of Stationery and Fuel, 3,000 00 

On account of State's Prison, 3,500 00 

On account of Distribution of Laws, 700 00 

On account of Militia, 300 00 

On account of State Library, 800 00 

On account of State House, 500 00 

Oo account of Governor's House, 300 00 

On account of Governor's Circle, • • • 100 00 

On account of Public Arms, 100 00 

On account of Contingent Fund,- « • • 1,200 00 

$80,000 00 



On reference to the Synopsis of the appropriations for 1850, it 
will be seen, that in several items the appropriations have been over- 
drawn, and it is recommended that the appropriation Bill for 1851 
should include amounts sufficient to cover these overpayments. 

The annual appropriation of five hundred dollars, for the Contin- 
gent Fund, is entirely insufficient to meet the expenditures necessarily 
chargeable upon it,and should be increased to at least thesum of (1,200. 

Congress, at its late session, donated to Indiana the unsold wet 
lands within the limits of the State, and steps were immediately ta- 
ken, with the utmost promptitude, by the Governor, to secure their 
selection in the several counties, by the county surveyors or other 
competent persons. The procuring of Maps, examination of titles, 
and selection of these lands, will involve a considerable expense, 
which must necessarily be defrayed by the State, and I therefore 
recommend an appropriation for this purpose, to be expended under 
the direction of the Governor or other proper authority, of such sum 
as the Legislature may determine to be necessary. 

An additional appropriation of $40,000 will be necessary to meet 



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63 

Che expoDses of the ConstttutioDal Convention, and a further sum of 
from $3,000 to $5,000 Tor the payment of the Printing and Binding 
of the Convention. The undersigned has not considered himself 
authorized, by any existing Law, to audit claims for such Printing 
or Binding, under the contract of the Convention, and therefore re- 
commends to the Legislature an appropriation tor that purpose. 

The Revenue for the year 1849, including the amount collected for 
the Delinquency of 1848 and previous years, has been generally ac- 
counted for by the several County Treasurers, and with few excep- 
tions paid over with much promptness. The details of the settle- 
ments with these officers will be found in statement No. 4 in the 
appendix. In the case of Sullivan county, owing to the loss by fire 
of all the records, near the close of the collecting season, it was im- 
possible to make an accurate settlement. Relying however upon the 
integrity of the accounting officers of the county, and comparing the 
statements with those of former dates, a conditional settlement was 
made by the Auditor, which was concurred in by this office, and a 
confirmation of it by the Legislature is respectfully suggested. The 
amount of State Revenue found due on this settlement is less than 
lor the previous year, but it is accounted for from the fact that the 
purchasers at the Tax sale, after the fire, refused to pay for their 
purchases. A re-assessment also of all the real estate of the county 
will have to be provided for by the Legislature. 

The net amount of Revenue, collected on the Duplicate for the 
year 1850, including the Revenue from the State Bank, is as follows: 

Revenue of 1849, $415,114 59 

Delinquent Revenue of 1848, 35,367 17 

ToUl, $450,481 76 

Net amount collected for Fiscal year 1849, 432,283 78 

Showing an increase of* ••• $18,197 98 

The following statement exhibits the rate of Taxation for four 
^eare past, the net amount of State Revenue collected, and the 
increase: 



Ff«r. 



Rmttt per 

eioo. 

cU. mlUa. 



PoU 






Inentu9» 



KM?,. 

ma-. 



96 7 
98 5 



358^15 61 
406,721 89 
499;n3;8 
450,461 76 



50,9(« Sd 

18^ sa 



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54 

The increase of Taxables for the same period has been as follows: 



TMrs, 




1846. 
)847. 
1848, 



124^10,441 
]S8,960,fle6 
133.419,056 



. J27,C1» 
.960,887 < l?0,On 
f.fSO.545 ]r6;86S 
1.4.%.0;0 143.780 



6,1M 
7.4S5 



The average increase in Taxables since 1847 is not far from three 
and a half per cent, annually, and of polls over five per cent., a fact 
which must be gratifying alike to the citizens and creditors of the 
State; and for years to come this rate of increase may be safely re- 
lied upon in all our estimates, even if no improvement be made in 
the mode of assessment of real and personal e^^tate. 

The rate of Taxation for the year 1850 for State purposes is 33i 
cents per hundred dollars valuation, and seventy-five cents poll tax, 
and the net Revenue to be realized therefrom may be estimated 
at ' $510,000 00 

Upon this sum will be chargeable the following items,viz: 

Indebtedness to the State Bank, $127,500 00 

Expenses of State Government, estimated, 80 000 00 

Expenses of Convention, estimated, 80,000 00 

Redemption of State Scrip, estimated, 40,000 00 

Benevolent Institutions, estimated, 65,000 00 

Interest on State Debt January, 1851, including ex- 
change and expenses, 100,000 00 

Slime for July, 1851, 100,000 00 

Total charges, $593,500 00 

Estimated deficit at the close of the financial year 1851, $82,500 00 

According to this estimate the revenue collected on the Duplicates 
of 1850 will wipe out the present indebtedness of the Bank, defray 
the expenses of the State Government and Constitutional Convention, 
and of the Benevolent Institutions, redeem two-fifths of the out- 
standing Domestic Debt of the State, and pay the Interest on the 
State Debt for January, 1851, making it necessary to anticipate the 
revenues of 1851, by loan, only in an amount sufficient to meet the 
July interest, 1851. 

If a return is made to the former rate of taxation, to-wit : 30 cents 
per hundred dollars valuation, the net revenue collected on the du- 
plicates of 1851 for the fiscal year 1852 will be about $475,000 00. 

Upon which the following items will be chargeable, to-wit: 



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56 

Deficit of wa^ 18&I, $88,S00 <» 

Expeoses of Slate Government, 80,000 09 

Bedemplion of State Scrip, 40,000 01 

BenevoWnt Institutions, 65,000 00 

January Interest 1852 and expenses, lOO/XN) Oi 

Ja\y Interest 1852, and expenses, lOOgOOO 09 

Total charge, $467,500 00 

Leaving a surplus Oct. 31, 1852, of ,>7,500 00 

If this estimate be correct, and it cannot vary far from it, we shall 
commence the financial year 1853 with an inconsiderable surplus in 
the Treasury, with all our' Domestic Debt liquidated except a small 
balance of Treasury notes, and having sofiered no delinquency in 
the payment of Interest on the Public Debt. 

Should all the outstanding Bonds be surrendered, the Public Debt 
of the State, on the 1st day of January, 1853, %vill be as follows: 

5 per cent Stocks, $5,524,000 

2} per cent. Stocks, say 2,000,000 

ToUl, $7,524,000 



On this sum the annual interest will be $326,200, and without 
going into the details of further estimates, the ability of the State 
will readily be seen, not only to meet accruing interest with prompt- 
ness, but to appropriate an annual surplus to the liquidation of the 
principal itself. 

The ability of the State for the future may very appropriately be 
argued from the history of the past. Commencing with the suspen- 
sion of the public works in 183d-40, during a period of ten years of 
more or less financial embarrassment, the State has paid upon her 
liabilities as follows; 

Upon Domestic Debt, $2,529,156 

Interest on Foreign Debt, 639,269 

Miking a total of $3,168,^1 

Or en average of $316j8^ per annum, besides defraying theei« 
ponses of the State Government. This statement fumi£(hes an ample 

Keranty to our creditors* that the tax payers of Indiana not only 
ve the will, but the ability, to dischaifie all their just obligationa^ 
and that every burden will be cheerfully borne to itetore and sostak 
the impaired credit of the State. 
It is a matter of deep interest to all who have the credit and weU 



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66 

fare of the State at heart, to inquire what prospect there may be for 
the gradual aad ultimate liquidation of the principal of the Pubhc 
Debt. It is hardly probable that before the 1st January, 1854, any 
considerable sum can be applied to this purpose. The following 
fable is prepared on the supposition that on that day the sum of 
$100,000 may be appropriated to the payment of Principal, that 
this amount may be annually increased in the sum of $10,000, and 
that to it may be added the sum saved from the interest account 
The table is tor twenty years, and supposes For its basis the debt to 
be $7,524,000 and the annual Interest $326,200. The results shown 
by the table are highly satisfactory, and the ability of the State to 
nalize this estimate is by no means overrated. 



TABULAR ESTIMATE. 



T9»». 


JVeC JUv«««e. 


Interest eaved 
t9 mpplf •!! 


7V(«/ Paymentt 


Jtim»n*t^JtnniMl 


Am^ummfPrim. 






Prineift, 


on Principal. 


Interest, 


Hpat. 


18M, 


$100,000 




100,000 00 


321.200 00 


7,424.000 00 


'!S- 


110,000 


. 5,00000 


115,000 00 


315,450 00 


7,309.000 00 


J2S' 


180,000 


5.750 00 


125,750 00 


309,162 50 


7.18?.250 00 


1857, 


130,000 


6,287 50 


126,287 50 


302,348 18 


7.046.989 50 


JSf^ 


H0.000 


6.814 37 


146,814 37 


293,007 40 


6.900,148 i3 


1S5», 


150,000 


7,340 71 


157,340 71 


287,140 37 


6,742.l»7 48 


1800, 


160.000 


7;?67 03 


167^17 03 


278,747 01 


6.574,940 39 


1881, 


170,000 


8,393 35 


178,393 35 


869.827 35 


6,?.96.547 04 


*!?» 


180,000 


8,910 66 


188,910 66 


200.381 36 


6.907.027 38 


1883. 


190,000 


9,445 08 


199,445 98 


250.409 07 


6 008,181 40 


1864, 




9,973 29 


jW9,»72 29 


939.910 4S 


5,708,209 11 


?!£• 


siolooo 


10,496 61 


220,498 61 


228.885 52 


5.577.710 50 


1886, 


290,000 


11,024 09 


251.024 93 


217,334 27 


5.346,665 57 


18S7, 


?S'S!5 


11,551 94 


841,551 94 


805,256 71 


5.]05,]34 33 


'SS' 


240,000 


12,077 56 


252,077 56 


192.652 83 


4.85^,056 77 


1809, 


SSO,000 


12,603 87 


263.0OS87 


179.928 64 


4.500,458 90 


1870. 


960,000 


13,130 19 


273.130 19 


165.866 13 


4.317.328 71 


1871, 


270,000 


13,656 50 


283,656 SO 


151,683 31 


4.033,666 81 


J87S. 


980,000 


14.182 89 


294,188 82 


170.974 10 


3.7?9.48S 39 


1873, 


290.000. 


14,709 14 


304,709 14 


121.738 71 


3.434.774 85 


1874, 


300.000 


i5;n5 4S 


315,235 45 


105.970 44 


3,119,588 80 



Thus in 1874, the Public Debt, by this gradual process of reduc* 
tion, will be diminished to the sum of 83,119,538 80, and of this 
sum two millions are estimated as 2i per cent, slocks. 

The Revenue Laws of the State i^equire some important modifica- 
tions, and the first is the adoption of some system to equalize the as* 
tessment of property. The mprit of any system of taxation is its 
equality. It should bear upon all alike. The poor man has no con- 
cealments in his cabin, or upon his farm. His all is exposed to the 
examination of the assessor, who is able to estimate to the fraction 
of a dollar, the value of this particular class of pmperty, while his 
aeighbor has well filled coffers, lined with evidences of wealth, which 
escape the knowledge of the officer. The true system i^ to value all 
veal and personal estate, rights, credits, moneys, and effects, at their 
actual cash value. 

This system wnjn brought into practical operation in the State of 
Ohio in the year 1847, and the following table will show its results: 



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in 

TABLE. 



r-r.. 


JiMi Frcptrtf. 


Personal Profwrty, 


T0UI MilM ^ Pr9p§^ 


1844 


•107,142,158 
108,185,744 
109,040,036 
396,796.730 
330,905,273 
335,839,311 


•29,000,514 
35,974,725 
40,960j60S 
83,964,430 
90,072.718 
95X00,074 


•136,142,066 
144, 60,469 
150,901,331 
410,763,160 
421,067,901 
430,839^66 


1845, 


1846. 


1847. 


jaigt 


1819 



The system met with great opposition in Ohio, in its inceptioUi 
but all are now convinced of its wisdom and justice. Besides equal* 
iziDg the Taloe of property, it added to the list of taxables more than 
two hundred per cent. Its effects here would be less striking, but it 
would increase the amount of taxables on the duplicate at least fifty 
miU'ons of dollars. As no general appraisement has been made since 
1846, it is believed that no more favorable time could be found for 
its commencement, if deemed advisable by the Legislature. 

Even under the present law, there is either ^reat difficulty 10 
reaching certain descriptions of property, or remissness on the part 
of the listing officers. For the year 1S50 the whole amount of cor- 
poration stock assessed is only $286,516, and in but thirteen coun- 
ties is there any returned. The inequality of this assessment is seen 
in the example of the counties of Marion and Marshall. Marion 
tounty isasssessed with $11,349 corporation stock, and Marshall with 
$11,885, while Marion has 3,454 taxable polls and Marshall but 785. 
There should certainly be some provisions for taxing this description 
of property, that would obviate this irregularity. The value of 
property b constant! v changing, and there should be at least, a bien- 
nial appraisement of the entitle property, real and personal, in the 
State. 

A large amount of State Revenue returned delinquent for non- 
payment, is annually lost, and the law furnishes no means of ascer- 
taining whether the fault be in the negligence of the collectors, or 
the inability of the tax-payers. Statement No. Ill, in the appendix 
Is soHioined for the purpose of showing this delinquency for a single 
year, 1848. The table shows as follows: 

Total delinquency for 1848, $75,487 23 

Total collections, 46,885 64 

Balance uncollected, $28,601 59 



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The extent of thb loss may be seen by a comparison with oor 
sister state, Ohio. 

SUUement rf Taxes in Ohio. 



TMf, 


mtu TnLmnU. 


BUfTtatfUHUi, 


l9CtU, 


1844, 

1845^ 

184? 

18< .. 

we 


•948,906 63 
1,006,001 99 
I,90e,4«9» 
1,131,398 14 
1,365,760 96 


$939,358 79 
973,507 47 
],16I,9» 46 
1,114,387 61 
],32?,001 54 


$19,743 84 
33,498 n 
46,S?9 7$ 
17,110 S3 
43,767 n 




«5,560,iS7 50 


$5,40M7187 


$]5B.0S&a 



This sum of f 158,655 63 includes the delinquency, Treasurem* 
fees, erroneous assessments, &c., amounting to at least $100,000 
making the entire delinquency uncollected about one per cent. 

Statement of Taxes in Indiana. 



r#«-#. 


auiB 7te LwUd, 


Sundry dedue- 
tipnt. 


JV«t amount Col- 


DtUnnMmat 


1844 


$306,536 11 
323,054 82 
425,380 94 
461,904 44 
493,n8 34 


$15,9W) 31 
15,702 65 
80,809 04 
23,754 67 
27,800 46 


r267,?25 70 
290,100 05 
356,515 61 
406,781 89 

432,283 78 


$33,960 10 
17,8SB 13 
47,956 29 
33,517 88 
33,434 10 


i8« ::;::;::.:::::;::: 


isie! 


lis :::;::::;;;::::;:: 
IWB. 




$8,010,384 65 


$102;297 13 


1 $1,758,946 96 


$155440 4* 



This shows a total of delinquencies uncollected of $155,140 49, or 
an average of 31,028 11 per annum. It is believed that under pro- 

ger enactments one-half of this sum may be annually saved to the 
tate. 

The practice varies in different counties in regard to the Treasur- 
er's per centage for the collection of Road Tax. The Revenue offi-^ 
cers are at best inadequately remunerated for their labors and re* 
sponsibilities, and I can see no good reason for compelling them to 
perform this service gratuitously. The law at least should be intel- 
ligible. 

The mileage to be allowed County Treasurers in making their 

annual settlements, and to Sheriffs for conveying convicts to the 

State's Prison, if fixed by Law, would relieve the accounting officers 

from much responsibility and produce uniformity in the charges for 

' such services. 

The reports required in Sections, 100 to 103, and Sec. 115, Chap* 
13, Revised Statutes, have been received from the following counties 
oniy, within the last fiscal year, to-wit : Bartholomew, Brown, Car- 



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SB 

roll, Crawrord, Delaware, Daviess, Gibson, Greene, Grant, Hen- 
dricks, Honry, Harrison, Jay, J^nnin^, Johnson, Lake, Laporte, 
Marion, Orange, Perry, Parke, Ripley, Steuben, Vanderburgh, War- 
ren, Warrif.k, Washington, Wayne, Whitley. 

Sec. 103, Chap. 13, in) poses a heavy penalty for neglecting to 
make these reports, but it appears to have been wholly disregarded 
in two-thirds of the counties in the State. The reports should be 
made punctually from all the counties or they are of no value to thb 
office. 



TABULAR STATBMBim. 

The Tabular Statements in the Appendix are as follows: 

No. L Showing the Assessment of Taxes for 1849, for State» 
County, Road, School, Township and other purposes. 

No. H. Showing the amount of Taxes returned Delinquent for 
die year 1849. 

No. III. Showing the amount of State Revenue returned delin- 
quent for 1848, and the amount thereof collected in 1849. 

No. IV. Showing the settlement with county Tk'easurers, in de- 
tail, for collections of State Revenue for 1849. 

The footings of this statement are as follows: 

Amount of Tax assessed for 1849, $509,331 30 

Atnount assessied by Tfea^urers, 3,315 73 

Amount of Delinquency collected, 46,074 31 

Over charges, 4 00 

Total charge, $558,725 34 

CRBDITB. 

Amount returned Delinquent, $88,195 89 

Brroneons assessnnmts, 3,390 39 

Treasurer's Fees, 18,938 29 

Taxes Refunded,- •••• 1,114 74 

Taxes paid at the State Treasury, 122 86 

Printing, 654 95 

Mileage, 1,416 89 

Net balance due Treasury, 444,892 00 

$558,725 34 



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eo 



' The amount of ReVeaue actually paid in is as follows : 

By the Branches of the State Bank, to-wit: 

Evansville Branch, $434 97 

Lawrenceburgh Branch, 529 46 

Vincennes Branch, 301 78 

Lafayette Branch, 594 22 

Indianapolis Branch, 477 71 

New Albany Branch, 479 05 

Fort Wayne Branch, 172 39 

Richmond Branch, 444 69 

Terre Haute Branch, 361 60 

Bedford Branch, 173 32 

Madison Branch, 656 74 

Michigan City Branch, 472 50 

South Bend Branch, 117 90 

$5,216 33 

Paid by County Treasurers, 445,265 43 

$450,481 76 



Overpayments by County Treasurers. 

Blackford county, refunded, $65 14 

Parke county, refunded. 1,000 00 

Pike county, 179 50 

Total, $1,244 64 

The following balances were due from Treasurers Oct. 31, 1850: 

Delaware county, $2 53 

Martin county, 50 00 

Shelby county, 803 38 

fit. Joseph county, • 13 25 

Washington county, 2 00 

Total, $871 16 



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61 

Statement No. V. exhibits the number of acres of Land, and Polls 
assessed for 1850, with the value of Lands, Improvements, Town 
Lots and buildings, Corporation stock, and personal property, for 
said year, ia all the counties in the State, with the exception of 
Elkhart county from which no returns have been received. The 
ratnms from Elkhart county for 1849 ai*e included in the footings 
of the Table, which are as fellows : 



Number of Acres of Land assessed for 1850,* 



17,025,1M 



Valuation* 

7alue of Lands without improvements, $59,314,861 

Value of Improvements, 25,414,851 

Value of Town Lots and Buildings, 16,140,540 

Value^of Corporation Stock, 286,516 

Value of Pewonal Property, 36,276,797 

Total Valuation, $137,443,565 

Number of Polls assessed for 1850, 149,986 

The Increase over the assessment of 1849 is as follows: 

Acres of Land assessed, 141,539 



Increased Valuation. 

Value of Lands, $565,208 

Value of Improvements, • • • • 815,551 

Value of Town Lots and Buildings, 897^13 

Value of Corporation Stock, 164,152 

Value of Personal Property, 1,571,781 

To tal Increase ,> $4,014,504 

Increase in Polls, • 6,266 



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Statdineiil No. VL exhibits the emouDt of Thxm mmmei for 
1860» the fooltogB of which are as follows; 

Amouat of Sute tax for IBS'), •571,512 74 

Amount of County tax for IS50|- 453,809 34 

Amount of Road tax for 1850, 147,500 03 

Amount school tax, 1^,641 33 

Township and other taxes, 32,239 24 

Delinqjent taxes, 18S,540 99 

Total taxes, $1,5194243 56 



Increased Assessment of State tax over 1849,- 



$61,882 2S 



Statement No. YII. exhibits the names of the Borrowers of the 
several Trust Funds, with the date of mortgages, and amount 
Itaoed. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

E. W. H. ELLIS, 
Auditor of l^te. 



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APPENDIX. 



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71 • 

STATEMENT NO. III. 

Showing the amount of State Revenue Delinquent for 1848, and the 
amount thereof collected in 1849. 



k 

■• 

i 



CountU9» 



8tat4 D9linq%9nci99 /t 


Amount ColUcUi, 


$1,768 S5 


1,818 40 


8,053 98 


1,987 99 


765 i» 


348 84 


40 86 


86 06 


399 15 


444 14 


1,055 70 


718 61 


964 55 


186 36 


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1,464 91 


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337 69 


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1,07197 


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589 79 


775 38 


470 47 


588 58 


575 48 


.416 70 


965 55 


1,506 48 


1,987 75 


384 59 


59 57 


838 60 


364 38 


1,609 43 


793 83 


61173 


8100 


328 50 


310 16 


18143 


87 60 


739 50 


500 18 


959 94 


393 68 


1,486 63 


898 05 


986 13 


604 61 


639 48 


694 77 


474 66 


960 43 


611 48 


186 97 


668 10 


509 78 


749 66 


516 11 


687 14 


443 18 


999 49 


156 31 


613 90 


489 91 


8,518 96 


1,185 86 


a» 16 


560 34 


566 48 


7159 


1,696 05 


1,396 80 


1,333 18 


886 57 


887 10 


743 64 


170 38 


83 39 


515 54 


859 41 


1,003 67 


578 98 


1,903 47 


809 14 


8,736 18 


1,198 34 


494 98 


396 44 


59106 


365 18 


758 38 


697 86 


769 38 


553 90 


853 85 


486 55 


837 87 


456 36 


489 35 


858 77 


376 37 


170 68 


370 54 


806 65 


936 75 


687 48 


994 31 


513 43 


896 05 


196 31 


436 08 


310 95 


319 10 


167 80 


i;(60 50 


1^1 94 


335 30 


160 50 


1,15106 


466 98 


1,960 78 


1,017 18 


951 35 


887 51 



1 j Adams, 

8 I Alton, 

Bartholomew, 
Benton, 
Blackfonl. • 
Boone, 
Brown, 
CerroU, • 
Can, - 
Clark, 
Clay, . 
Clinton, • 
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DavieM, • 
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Decatar, - 
Dekalb, 
Delaware, 
Dubois, 
Elkhart, • 
Fayette, 
Floyd, 
FoonUin, - 
Franklin,- 
Fulton, 
Gibeon, • 
Grant, - 
Greene, • 
Hamilton, - 
• Hancock, - 
Harriaon, • 
Hendricka, 
Henry, - 
Howard, • 
Hontin^on, 
Jackaon, • 
Jaq»er,. - 

Jeflisnon, 
Jenninfi, • 
Johnson, 
Knox, 
Koecintko, - 
Ugu«... . 

LapoTte, o 
Lawrence, • 
Madiaon, • . 
Marion, 
Manhail,- 
Martin, 



3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
6 
9 

10 

11 

18 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

10 

90 

81 

98 

S3 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

99 

30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
49 
43 
44 
45 
46 
€7 
48 
49 
SO 
. 51 
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Montgomery, 
Monan, 
Noble, 
Ohio, • . 
Orange, • 
Owen, • 
Parke, . 

Pike,- 
PcMTter,- 

Palaaki, 
Pntnam, • 
Banlolpli, . 
Ittpley, . 



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71 • 

STATEMENT NO. III. 

Showing the amount of State Revenue Delinquent for 1848, and the 
amount thereof collected in 1849. 



Conntw. 




Jtmount OolUctid. 



1 I Adams, 

9 , Allen, 

Bartholomew, 
Beoton, 
Blackford. • 
Boone, 
Brown, 

CaiToll, - . 
Caw, - 
Clark, . • 
Clay, . . 
Clinton, • 
Crawford, • 
Daviess, • 
Dearborn, • 
Decatur, • 
Dekalb, 
Delaware, 
Dubois, 
Elkhart, • 
Fayette, 
Floyd, 
Fountain, - 
Franklin, - 
Fulton, 
Gibson, • 
Grant, - 
Greene, • 
Hamilton, • 
•Hancock,- 
Harrison, • 
Hendricks, 
Henry, - 
Howard, • 
Hnntin^n, 
Jackson, • 
Jasper,- - 

Jefferson, 
Jennings, • 
Johnson, 
Knox, 
Kosciatko, • 

Laporte, « 
Lawrence, • 
Madison, • • 
Marion, 
Marshall,- . 
MarUn, - 
Miami, • - 
Monroe, 
Montgomery, • 
Morgan, 
Noble, 
Ohio, ■ . 
Orange, • 
Owen, - 
Pfcrke, . . 
Perry, - 
Pike,. - . 
Porter,. 
Posey, - . 
Pnlasii, . 
Patnam, - 
Ba»dolph, . 
Ripley, . . 



$1,768 SS 

9,053 96 

765 09 

40 86 

399 15 

1,055 70 

964 55 

1,145 00 

1,464 91 

1,030 30 

584 39 

1,089 71 

337 69 

1,071 97 

960 00 

730 36 

775 38 

588 58 

.416 70 

1,506 46 

384 59 

898 60 

1,609 43 

611 73 

328 50 

181 43 

732 50 

959 94 

1,486 63 

086 13 

839 46 

474 66 

611 49 

669 10 

740 66 

687 14 

999 49 

613 90 

9,518 96 

aSO 16 

566 49 

1,696 05 

1,333 18 

887 10 

170 39 

515 54 

1,003 67 

1,909 47 

9,730 19 

494 99 

59106 

759 38 

760 39 
853 95 
837 87 
480 35 
376 37 
370 54 
036 75 
504 31 
906 05 
436 09 
319 10 

i;mm>50 

335 30 
1»15106 
1,960 79 

051 35 



1319 40 
1,987 90 
348 94 
96 06 
444 14 
718 61 
186 36 
505 45 

905 36 
985 00 
490 40 
766 85 
931 99 
895 04 
141 84 
589 70 
470 47 
575 49 
965 55 

1^287 75 

59 57 
384 38 
793 89 

8100 
310 16 

87 60 
500 18 
303 69 
892 05 
604 61 
694 77 
960 43 
186 97 
500 70 
516 11 
443 18 
156 31 
480 01 
1,195 86 
560 34 

71 50 
1,386 80 

886 57 
743 64 

63 30 
959 41 
579 SS 
809 14 
1,108 34 
308 44 
365 16 
697 86 
553 00 
486 55 
456 36 
958 77 
170 69 

906 65 

887 49 
513 43 
196 31 
310 95 
167 90 

1/>31 04 
160 50 
486 98 

1,017 13 
987 51 



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72 



Statement No. III. — Showing the amount of State Revenue Delinquent 
1848, and the amount thereof collected. — Continued. 



89 

no 



Counties. 




Jtmount CoUecttd. 



Rush, 
Scott, . 
Shelby,- - 
Spencer, 
Sullivan, - 
Steuben, 
St. Joseph,- 
Switzerland, 
Tippecanoe, 
Tipton, - 
Union, 
Vanderburgh, 
Vermillion, 
Vigo, - - 
Wabash, - 
Warren, 
W^arrick, • 
Washington, 
Wavne, - 
Weils, . 
White, . 
Whitley, 

Total, 



475 66 
5?6 19 

1,485 01 
661 39 
904 46 
573 87 
936 14 
284 94 

3,453 43 
269 83 
166 25 
634 03 
716 31 
935 98 
547 05 
467 36 
133 85 
281 27 

S,059 83 
670 18 
S75 45 
300 19 

•75,487 83 



150 36 
393 11 
835 88 
439 56 
899 53 
416 77 
701 77 

60 31 

8,711 07 

820 13 

88 59 
259 51 
340 93 
365 11 
369 18 
838 34 

31 41 
158 11 
873 58 
709 48 
144 35 
359 51 

•40,88564 



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73 



STATEMENT NO. IV. 



Shouxing the Seilkment with CourUy Treasurers in dtlail, for collec- 
tions of State Revenue for 1849. 



DR. 



Wm. Tboct, JiMditcr. 



Amonnt of Duplicate,. 
A»9e9Md by Tr«« surer,. 
Delinqnencies Collected,. 



No. 1« Adams County. 

James B. Simcokc, Treasurtr. 
I CR. 

12^7 68 I Delinqoenclfs, $894 40 

6 01 EiToneoiiit ABHeBBmeat, 22 99 

1,812 40 ' Treaaurer'B Fees, 174 44 

Printing 3 33 

Taxes Refunded, 13 30 

Mileage, 24 00 

Paid State Treauurer, 3,544 53 



$4,676 29 . 



$4,676 S9 



H. W. Joan, Jtuditor. 

DR. 

AmoQDt of Daplicata 

Aaaeased by Treasurer 

Delinquency Collected,.... 



No. 2. Allen C'onnty. 



$9,006 47 

39 99 

1,067 29 



$11,033 73 



S. 
CR. 



M. Bi.Af K, Treasurer. 



Dclinqufiicy 3,156 59 



OverchareeH, 

Treaaurers Fees , 

Revenue Refunded,... 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treauurer,. 



61 94 
271 12 
33 00 
24 00 

7,475 10 

$11,033 75 



Davis R. Watlajtb, Jtuditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 6,560 10 

A ssetised by Treauurer, 62 23 

Delinquencies Collected, 346 24 



No. 8. Bartholomew County. 



Wm. F. 
CR. 

Delinquency 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Taxes Refunded 

Printing, 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer 



PiB«loJt, Treasurer. 



$6,990 66 , 



$l,09SiQ 

960 80 

29 75 

40 00 

6 72 

5,560 47 

$6,99ol6 



Hartlkt T. Howard, Auiiur. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate 

Delinqoenciee Collected,. . 



No. 4. Benton County. 

James Kxksso.n, Treaaitrer. 
I CR. 

866 19 ' Delinqaency 236 53 

96 06 Erroneous Assessment, 4 96 

Treasurer's Fees, 46 97 

Taxes Refunded 3 66 

Mileage, 15 00 

Paid State Treasurer, 605 13 



$912 27 



$912 27 



Jena J. Coos, Awditor, 



DR. 



No. 6. 



Amoont of Duplicate, $1,344 89 

Assessed by Treasurer, 19 02 

Delinquencies Collected, 438 86 

Overpaid and Refunded 65 14 



Blackford County. 

AsRAHAM Staul, Treasurer. 
CR. 

Delinquency, 519 71 

Erroneous Assessment, 17 ]0 

Treasurer's Fees, 82 33 

Taxes Refunded 9 50 

Paymentsat State Treasury, 5 28 

Mileage » .' 16 00 

FaidSfstc riT*«urfr 1,217 99 



f 1.^67 91 



51,H67 91 



1D9 



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74 



Jaku a. Ndnx, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate 

AsMfsed by Treasurer, 

Delinquencies Collected, . . , 



No* 6. Boone County* 

J. T. McLaoqhuic, 
CR. 

•5,337 69 Delinquency, 

5 06 Error in Addition, 

718 61 Erroneous A ssessment 

Treasurer's Fees 

Printing, 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer, '. '. 



•6,061 36 



7V«M«rsr. 

•1,187 59 

39 63 

12 59 

177 56 

454 

4 16 

4,635 89 



No. T. Brown County 

DBA9RACB Charblsk, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate •1,344 73 

Assessed by Treasurer, 7 03 

Delinquencies Collected 186 36 



•1,438 13 



W. W. Bakxr, 

CR. 

Delinquency 

Erroneous Assessment, [ 

Treasurer's Fees 

Mileage 

Paid S>ate Treasurer, 



No. 8. Carroll County. 

Jaxbi H. Stbwart, Auditor. Ex-ofRcio. 

DR. ] 

Amount of Duplicate, •5,688 16 Delinquency,.. 

Assessed by Treasurer 7 39 I Erroneous Assesiments. 

Delinquencies Collected, 505 45 Treasurer's Fees, 

I Mileage, 

I Paid State Treasurer,..., 



MiLO DXBBLB, 

CR. 



Jat Mu. AudU0r, 



•6,301 00 ! 



No. 9« Cass County. 



DR. 



Amount of Duplicate, ^5,156 06 

Assessed by Treasurer, 13 37 

Delinquency Collected, 898 88 



•6,068 31 



Delinquency. .... 
Treasurer's Fees,. 



E. B. Stkomo, 
CR. 



•6,06136 



Troaauror. 

315 48 

85 89 

67 S8 

8 00 

1,031 47 

•1,438 18 



Troasuror. 

•1,619 43 

19 53 

173 84 

13 00 

4,377 81 

•6,30100 



TroasuTor. 



Printing, 

Taxes ReAinded, 

Paid at State Treasury,. 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer,.., 




Campbkll Hat, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate., 

Assessed by Treasurer 

Delinquencies Collected, . . . 



No. 10. Clark County. 



•6,733 36 
36 35 
385 00 



•7,054 61 



AvBRY Loao, 
CR. 

Delinquency, , 

Erroneous Assessments, 

Taxes Refunded, 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Mileage ., 

Paid State Treasurer, 



•6,068 31 



Troaonror. 

•1,107 11 

36 34 

19 44 

353 10 

18 73 

5,630 00 



•7,054 61 



Jesse Fuller, Auditor. 

DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, $3SiQB 15 

Assessed by Treasurer, 78 -jfi 

Delinquencies Collected, 499 40 



No. 11. Clay County. 

John Williahs, TVeasurer. 
CR. 

$784 56 

159 J9 

Taxes Refunded 43 44 

Mileage, n 00 

Paid State Treasurer, 8,788 73 



•3,785 91 



Delinquency, .... 
Treasurer's Fees,. 



•3,785 91 



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75 



. _ No. 18, ClinloB County. 

Jobs P. Ceothku, jaitdit0r. 

DR. I 

i??^v'jPl!L" -*-*»; $5,m 39 | Delinquency, 



Jab. G. Frammm, 
CR. 



TY—surtr, 



I by Treasurer, 

Sellnquenciw Collected,. .. 



8 51 
766 83 



•6,176 75 



Erroneoua Aseemment,. . 

Trcaiurer** Fees, 

Taxes Refunded 

Mileage 

Paid State Treaiurer 




f 6,176 75 



CAjmnuM W. Kurou, JtudUt. 
DR, 

Amoant of DnpUcate, 

AsMfltedby Treasurer, 

DelinqueaciM Collected 



Hattrbw L. Bxstt, Jtudit^r, 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate 

AsMssed by Treasurer, 

DeUaqnencios Collected, 



No. 18. Crawford Coustir. 

JosBPM H. Tbormtom, TVSSSMTSr. 

Delinquency, '. ^935 19 

Erroneous Assessment, 34 90 

Treasurer's Fees, no 01 

Taxes Refunded, 17 S 

Mileage, jO 01 

Paid State Treasurer, 2,013 04 



•S,183 11 

44 65 

S31 90 



|S,450 95 



iS,450 75 



No* 14. Daviess Coanty, 

John Thompsok, TVsosursr. 
CR 

Delinquency, * $1,046 37 

ISrroneotts Assessment, x 80 

Treasurer's Fees, jai ^ 

Taxes Refunded, u 99 

Mileage, iq qo 

Paid State Treasurer, 3,865 96 

I5.1W 14 05,108 14 



$4,253 77 

23 33 

885 04 



No, 15. 
Rbo«s« Boobxb, JHdifr. 
DR. 

Amount of DnpUeata, $12,400 08 

Assessed by Treasurer, 71 15 

DellnqoeBcioo Collected, 141 84 



Dearborn County. 

ConxBLics O'BsiKx, TVsositrsr. 

Delinquency \ $1.050 01 

Erroneous Assessments, 173 07 

Treasurer's Fees 405 40 

Taxes Reflinded, 100 QO 

Mileage, 27 80 

Paid State Treasurer. 10,856 30 



$18,613 07 



$19,613 07 



Avmsw Dtbx, Audita, 

DR. 

Amount of Duplicate , 

Aie e ss ed by Treasurer 

DelinqpeBciee Collected,. . 



No. 16. 



$8,850 05 
58 66 
589 79 



Decatur County. 

Abram HcNDRico.TVscsttTsr. 
CR. 

Delinquency, eggs 07 

Erroneous Assessments, 86 34 

Treasurer's Fees, 306 09 

Taxes Refunded 3 03 

Mileage, 7 gg 

Paid State Treasurer, $7,494 19 



$8,833 40 



$8^33 40 



MiLBB Watbsmaji, JtudiUr. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 

A ss e ss ed by Treasurer, 

DeliBqaenciee Collected .... 



No. IT. De Kalb County. 

WuLCT Paib, 7>scsiir«r. 
CR 

$8.753 50 Delinquency ,' $833 74 

9 48 Treasurer's Pees 9466 

470 47 Mileage 27 42 

Paid State Treasurer 9,277 72 



$3,833 54 



$3,831 M 



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JosKPii Akthony, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amoant ofDupIiccte, 95,188 60 

AssesBed by Treaiurer, 45 39 

Delinquencies Collected 575 4S 



No. 16, Delaware Connty« 



95,809 41 



VoLRCT WiLLSOK, TVeosurcr. 
CR. 

Delinquency, 9793 18 

•Treasurer's Fees 177 30 

Brroneous Assessmenta, 34 73 

Taxes Refunded, 18 50 

Printing, 98 10 

Mileage, 60 

PaidState Treasurer, 4,746 00 

Balance Due, 3 00 



95.809 41 



No. 19. Dubois Comitr 

BjkziL B. Bdmonston, Auditor. 

DR. 
Amount of Duplicate, $3,491 OS 



Assessed by Treasurer.. 

Costs of Advertising 

Delinquencies Collected,. 

Penalty and Interest , 

Amount Overpaid, 



20 13 

31 82 

240 64 

24 91 

3 UO 



$2,811 54 



John S. Marti n, 7V«atf«rer. 
CR. 

Delinquency, 

Erroneous Assessments, 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Taxes Refunded 

Printing, 

Mileage 

Paid State Treasurer 

99,811 54 



$538 78 


85 57 


97« 


36 63 


44 45 


90 80 


1,968 11 



No. 90. Elkhart County 

ICoBKST LowsT, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 95.516 79 

Assessed by Treasurer 184 

Delinquencies Collected 1,387 75 



Elias Carpxxtcr, Tyeaturer. 
CR. 

Delinquency. $1 ,645 31 

Treasurer's Fees, 159 SS 

Mileage 24 00 

I Paid State Treasurer 4,977 55 



$0,806 38 



I 



96.806 38 



No. 

Dakibl Emucn, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 

Assessed by Treasurer, 

Delinquencies Collected 



21. Fayette County. 

Wm. M. Smith, Treasurer. 
CR. 

$9,242 411 Delinquency, $393 30 

14 16 Brroneous Assessments, 27 82 

59 57 I Treasurer's Fees 337 21 

Taxes Refunded 1 68 

I Mileage 9 60 

i Paid St ate Treasurer 8, .546 53 

99,316 14 99,316 14 



AcoDSTCs Bradley, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 

Assessed by Treasurer, 

Delinquencies Collected,.... 



No,i«2. Floyd County. 

William SrCAKK, 7Vea*ur#r. 
CR 

98,47127 Delinquency, 990151 

41 94 Erroneous Assessments, 1 39 

384 38 Treasurer's Fees, 300 96 

Taxes Reftinded 50 00 

Mileage, 21 60 

PaidState Treasurer 7,622 13 



98,897 59 



98,897 50 



Vr'M. Lamb, Auditor. 

DR. 
Amoant of Duplicate,.... 
Delinquencies Collected,. 



No. 23. Fountain County. 

Barbr Spbnck, Treasurer. 
CR. 

, $8,603 12 1 Delinquency $2,118 25 

793 82 Treasurer's Fees 30154 

Printing, 75 00 

Mileage, 12 00 

I Psifl State Treasurer, 6,890 15 

$9 ,.196 94 ' 99,396 94 



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Aii»ttsw R. McClcut, JtniUor. 
DK. 

Amoant or Duplicate $njBd7 Sfi 

A9«fs4«d by Treararer, 116 53 

Delio^uencles Collected, 8100 



No. M. FraskliB Covnty. 



112,065 04 



BcRJAMiif H. Bdrion, 7Va«««r«r. 
CR 

Delinquency, $860 49 

Erroneous AseeMment, SO 38 

Treaaurer's Fees, 424 63 

Mileage, u 90 

Paid State Treaauror 10,730 93 



•13,065 04 



Joan DocoLAM, Auditor. 

DR. 
Amoirat of Dapticate,.... 
Aj$e8sed by Treasurer,.... 
Delinqaenciea Collected,. 



No. 25. Fulton County. 



•3,017 35 

33 94 

31016 



•3,36145 



K. 6. SmtTOCK, Treasurer. 

CK. 

Delinquency, •396 38 

Erroneous Assessments, 33 53 

Treasurer's Fees, 0031 

Taxes Kelunded, 3144 

Printing, 8 34 

Mileage, 14 88 

Paid State Treasurer 1,797 83 

•3,36145 



No. 86* Gibson County. 

WiLLxaM Kdrtz, Auditor. 
DR. 

Araoont of Daplicate, , •5,983 51 

.Anaesaedby Treaauier, 35 48 

Delinquencies Collected, 87 60 



•6,106 50 



Wm. Rbavis, Jr., Tretuurer. 
CR, 

Delinquency ^ •16758 

Treasurer's Fees, ' 27173 

Mileage 34 80 

Paid SUte Treasurer 5,64854 

•6,106 50 



Jamsb Bkowrlkb, wfviltftfr. 
DR. 

AmouBt of DopUcate, 

Aflsessed by Treasurer 

Delinquencies Collected,... 



No. «T. 



•3,919 08 
68 43 
500 18 



$4,487 69 



Grant County. 

B. W. Rdlsy, TVeaeursr. 
CR 

Delinquency, '. $1,065 85 

Erroneous Assessment, 41 85 

Treasurer's Fees, 17610 

Printing, 7 50 

Mileage ]2 00 

Paid SUte Treasurer, 3,164 39 

$4,487 60 



No. 88. Greene County. 

Samcbl R. Cavixs, Auditor. 

DR. ! 

Amount of Duplicate $4,397 68 1 Delinquency,. 

A»sesMdby Treasurer, 40 79 | Treasurer's Fees 

nellnqnenciea Collected, 90363 | Printing, 

I Mileage 

Paid State Treasurer, 



William Masom, Tretunror. 
CR. 

•1,25914 

15635 

175 

1388 

3,30197 



•4,732 09 



•4,73300 



lisn Faukt, Auditor. 



No. 89. Hamilton County. 

HiKAM G. FiHCH, Treaauror. 
DR. CR, 

Delinquency $8,338 60 



AmoQBt of Duplicate, •5,97160 

Asseaeed by Treasurer, 3303 

Delinquencies Collected, 823 OS 



•6,81666 



Erioaeous Assesamenta,. 

Treasurer's Fees 

Taxes Refunded, 

Printing, , 

Milesfe, , 

Paid State Treaaarer,. 



183 88 
188 50 
43 00 
3184 
336 
4,107 40 

•6,816 66 



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78 



X Mnst, JHdiUr. 



Ifo. 



DR. 



Amoont of Duplicate, $4^177 

AMeswdby Tre&iiurer,... 32 

Costs and Penalties, ]8 24 

Delinquenciea Collected, 604 61 



Haneock Comty. 

J. HoMTUvToa, 7V#< 
CR. 

Delioqaency, 91;m04» 

Erroneous Assessments, Ill 3S 

Treasurer's Fees, ISin 

Taxes Refunded,... 1753 

5:*'»ti»8 18 25 

Mileage, 330 

Paid State Treasurer, 3^] 50 



No. 81. Harrison Coanty. 

Samvbl J. Wkiobt, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, $5,460 28 

Assessed by Treasurer, 85 31 

Delinquencies Collected, 6S4 77 



16,180 30 



HuoB Nbblst, 

Delinquency, 

Erroneous Assessments, 

Treasurer's Fee«, 

Taxes Reftinded 

Mileage 

Paid State Treasurer, 



TVMWursr. 

1660 95 

77 29 

SS4 51 

596 

S8S0 

. 5,185 37 

9A,180 30 



No. 82. Hendricks Connty, 

Allen Hbbs, Auditor, 

fDR. . 
fDupUcat $7,89726 

Assessed by Treasurer, 4871 

Delinquencies Collected, S60 43 



r. 606 40 



Edmoitd Cla,sk, 
CR. 

Delinquency, 

Erroneous Assessments, 

Treasurer's Fees, 



Mileage, 

Paid Sute Treasurer,. 



7Vs«#«tr«r. 

864997 

93 53 

99105 

390 

6^645 45 

$7,006 40 



jAMn lurr. Auditor. 



DR. 



No. 88. 



Amount of Duplicate, $11,01166 

Assessed by Treasurer, 24 63 

Delinquencies Collected, 186 07 



Henry Connty. 

JOBN C. HoDBLtON, 
CR. 

Delinquency, 

Erroneous Assessments, 

Treasurer's Fees 

Mileage 

Paid sute Treasurer 



$11,993 96 



Trouomror, 

$563 94 

96 10 

43166 

880 

10,193 37 

$11,99398 



John Boban, Auditor. 



DR. 



No. 34. 



Amount of Duplicate $1,47788 

Assessed by Treasurer, 195 

Delinquencies Collected, 509 76 



Howard Connty. 

Adam ClaRKK, Treasurer. 

CR. 

Delinquency, 

Erroneous Assessments, 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer, 



$1,988 89 




$1,088 80 



No. 85, 

Jaxu R. Slack, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, $4,37795 

Assessedby Treasurer, 1947 

Delinquencies Collected, 516 11 



Hnntin^on Connty. 

Wilson B. Locgbridob, Troasuror. 
CR 

Delinquency, '. $899 36 

Erroneous Assessments 23 37 

Treasurer's Fees, 15008 

Mileage, 19 20 

Paid sute Treasurer, 3,819 09 

$4,919 83 $4^19 83 



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79 



. Sbbkaii, ^maur. 
DR. 

Amoant of Duplicate, 94,509 73 

A«e«Md b7 Tre&aurer, S3 15 

PenalUea and Costa 5045 

OeUnqocnciea Collected 383 73 



Ho. 96. Jaoksos Couutj. 



95,006 06 



Gkosok H. Mobpbt, 7VM««r«r* 
CR. 

Delinquency, $680 38 

Erroneous Assessmente, Sffi36 

Tieasarer'a Fees, 19S IS 

Advertising, 69 83 

Mileage 1180 

Paid State Treasurer 3,829 64 



95,06600 



Ifo, 

Goo. W. Spitub, J8mm»r. 
DR. 

Amooat of Duplicate, 

Aseesaed by Treasurer...... 

Delinqnencica Collected, 



ST. Jasper Covnty, 

Sahdbl S. SrABUNo, TVMaarer. 
CR. 

93076 Delinquency, $19337 

3 77 Erroneous Assessments, 37 47 

19631 Treasurer's Fees, 5400 

Mileage 1850 

Paid State Treasurer, 80650 



$1,09984 



$1,099 84 



Jomrm WiLtos, JtmdiUr. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 

Aiteeaedby Treaaurer, 

Delinqaenciee Collected,. . . 



Ho. 88* Jay County. 

JoXAt VoTAW, 7Vea«sr0r. 
CR. 

$3,06773 Delinquency, $85308 

18 75 Erroneous Assessments, 39 91 

48991 Treasurer's Fees, 10450 

Taxes Reftinded, 1377 

Mileage, 16 00 

Paid SUte Treaaurer, 9,55013 



$3,576 38 



$3,576 30 



HmiT Jaoxhait* JttiiUmr. 
DR. 

Amoant of Duplicate, 

Assessed by Treasorer, 

Delinqueuciea Collected,. . . 



Ha. 89. Jeflersoa Coanty. 



$18,485 68 

294 51 

1,185 86 



$19,836 05 



WlLUAll W, WoeLLBM, 7VM««rir. 
CR. 

Delinquency $3446^63 

Erroneous Assessments, 00 78 

Treasurer's Fees SS394 

Mileage, 1376 

Paid State Treasurer, 16,091 64 

$19,836 0» 



Jaxas GoonnTS, ^mdiur, 
DR. 

Araoant of Duplicate, 

Assessed by Treasurer 

OeUnquenciea Collected,.. 



No. 40. Jeaaiags Coaaty, 

Lbyi W. Todd, TVvcenrsr. 

I CR. 

$4,13189 Delinquency, $067 78 

10 S3 I Erroneous Assessments, 9 47 

560 34 , Treasurer's Fees, 165 26 

Taxes Refunded, 4 50 

Mileage 10 84 

Paid State Treasurer, 3,515 37 



$4,003 46 I 



$4,603 48 



Jacob SnnT, JtUitT. £x*»/. 
DR. 



Amount of Duplicate, $7,851 33 

Assessed by Treasurer, 31 40 

DtJiuqucncies Collected, 71 59 

OTarpaymcat, I 00 



No. 41. Johasoa Coaaty. 

HsiniT Fox, 7V«a««rar« 
CR. 
Delinquency, .'.'. $1,800 18 



$7,955 39 



Errontous Assessments,. 

Treusurer'a Fees, , 

Taxes Refunded, 

Printing, 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer,.... 



19 61 


371 10 


13 55 


11 50 


336 


5,816 08 



$7,955 39 



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Abkam Smith, .Auditor. 

DR. 
Amount of Duplicate,.... 
AsBessed by Treasurer,.... 
DeliDquencics Collected,. . 



80 



No. 48* Knox County. 



$8,488 18 

66 00 

1,3S6 80 



John If. Cooes, TVemturer. 

\ CR. 

Delinquency, $1,560 54 

«&) 

S46 40 

S335 

19 ?) 

5,908 49 



$7,880 96 



Erroneous AMessments,. 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Taxes Refunded 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer,.... 



$7,<*« St 



AtrKBD WiLCoz, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 94,3S27 33 

Assessed by Treasurer, 54 23 

Delinquencies Collected 884 65 



No* 48* Kosciusko Covnty. 



95,966 31 



William Wiluami, 7V«anrr. 
CB. 
Delinquencies, 9U^^ -^ 



Treasurer's Fees,. 

Taxes Refunded, 

Paid at State Treasury,. 

Mileage, , 

Paid State Treasurer,.... 



126 60 

IH 65 

19i 

19 JU 

3,683 60 

$5,266^1 



Simon M. Cctlcr, Auditor. 

DR. j 

Amount of Duplicate, 93,753 39 | 

Delinquencies Collected, 743 64 I 



No* 44* La Grange County* 



Samckl a. Bartlxtt, Trttuurtr. 
CR. 
Delinquency tUSSl 7^ 



Erroneous Assessments,. 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Mileage 

Paid State Treasurer,. ... 



94,496 03 I 



\1^ 

113 (M 

32 l« 

3,061 :3 

94,496 U3 



No* 4«* Lake County* 

Jo«CPB Jackbon, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, $1,319 74 

Assessed by Treasurer, 15 

Costs and Penalties, 7 35 

Delinquencies Collected, 76 04 



91,303 28 



Hknsy Wills, Treasurer. 

CR. 

Delinquency, $\f^7S 

Erroneous Assessments, 9 Oj 

Treasurer's Fees, 614^ 

Mileage 2?* SO 

Paid Slate Treasurer, 1,019 S 



$1,303 Jtj 



A J. Wa», Auditor. 

DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 

Assessed by Treasurer, 

Delinquencies Collected,.. 



No. 46. La Porte County. 

John M. Lkmon, Jr., TVetf^urrr. 
CR. 

96,640 87 Delinquency, 

40 08 Erroneous Assessments, 

35306 Treasurer's Fees, 

Taxes Refunded,. 

Paid at State Treasury, 

Mileage 

Paid Slate Treasurer, 



96,943 01 > 




$6,943 91 



JoHJf Pbtbes, Auditor. 

DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 

Assessed by Treasurer, 

Delinquencies Collected,.... 



No. 47. Lawrence County. 

JoHR VV. Tnojf psox. Treasurer 
I CR. 

Delinquency, 91.1^1 '^ 

"■ 30^04 



97,160 28 
34 38 
573 22 



97,756 88 



Treasurer's Fees,. 

Advertising, dec, 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer,. 



75 (1) 
14 40 
6,177 61 

.«7.75«> ^>i 



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81 



No. 48. Madison Coanty. 

J. W. WEmRFiKLO, Audifr. ^ Sbtb Smith, 7V««iir«r. 

DR. f CR. 
Amoant of Duplicate, $5,813 79 | Delinquency fcMlS 



AsttMed by Treasurer,. 
Delinquencies Collected,. 



Erroneoas Asiesements,. 
Treasurer's Pees,. 



16 64 
80717 I 

I Paid at State Treasury, 

1 Mileage, 

I Paid State Treasurer,. . 



f 6,637 60 



39 40 

176 50 

197 

704 

4,90389 

•6,637 00 



JouH W. Hakilton, AM4<u*ri 
D^ 

Amount of Duplicate, 15,303 81 

Assesaed by Treasurer, 13 30 

Delinquencies Collected, 1,196 34 



No. 49. Marion County. 

John M. Talbott, TVeMttrsr. 
1 CR. 

Delinquency, $8,8n 58 

Erroneous Assessments, 16 13 

Treasurer's Fees, 45946 

Paid SUte Treasurer, 13,164 88 

$16,513 45 $16,513 45 



No. 00. Marshall County 
WiLUAM M. Dunham, Auditor. 

DR. I 

Amount of Duplicate, $3,123 21 Delinquency, 

Assessed by Treasurer, 9 49 Erroneous AssessmenU, 

Delinqaeucies Collected, : 358 97 i Treasurer's Fees, 

j Taxes Reftinded, 

Advertising, 

■ Paid at State Treasury,. 

I Mileage 

Paid State Treasurer,. . . 



JosBPH Evans, 
CR. 



I 



82,491 67 



«534 67 
16 57 
79 47 
15 00 
10 50 
30 47 
20 00 

1,775 90 

$2,49167 



No. 51. 
R. C. Stsfbsx, Audifr, 

DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, $1,647 76 

Assessed by Treasurer, 1138 

Cosrtsand Penalties, 10531 

Delinquencies Collected, 259 85 



$8,024 84 



Martin County. 

RicHAXD NbaVb,' 7VM#«trsr. 
CR. 

Delinquency, 

Erroneous Assessments, 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Advertising, • 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer, 

Balance due, 



$55143 

351 

8377 

8390 

16 00 

1,806 33 
50 00 



Jambs M. Dbfkbbs, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 

Atscssed by Treasurer, 

Delinquencies Collected,.... 
Error m Addition, 



18.084 84 

No. 5*^. Miami County. 

Cjlrlbton R. Tbact, Tr9u$urtr. 
CR. 

$3,909 62 Delinquency, > 

1 43 64 Erroneous AesessmenU 

697 88 Treasurer's Fees, 

99 Taxes ReAinded,... 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer 



$4,753 li 



$484 11 
3340 
10880 
SI 00 
14 10 

4,096 70 

$4,758 11 



No. 53. Monroe County. 



Wji. C. Tabxinoton Auditor, 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, S5,9SS46 

Assessed by Treasurer, 6 25 

Delinquencies Collected,. 553 90 



$6,485 61 



Eli AS Abbl, TVsoj arer. 
CR. 

Delinquency, 765 30 

Erroneous Assessments, 48 45 

Treasurpr's Fees, 247 15 

Mileage 838 

Paid State Treasurer, 5,488 39 

$6,485 61 



IDIO 



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82 



No. 64. Montgomery County 

JoBJi fi. Albtin, AMditor, 
DR. 

Amount of Daplic&te, tlliTgee? 

ANessed by Treaturer 30 53 

DelinqoenciM Collected, 466 55 



«1S,303 75 



David Vaxcb, 7V«a«vr«r, 

DeUnquencjr, $903 04 

Erroneous A ftMmment, 45 05 

Treasurer'a Fees, 411 56 

Mileage 720 

Paid State Treasurer, 10,875 00 

•1S,303 75 



Milton R. Gotiidob, Auditt. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 07,207 67 

Aasested by Treasurer, 33 97 

Delinquencies Collected, 456 06 



87,697 70 



No. 55. Morgan County. 



Grant SrArrosn, Tr—»ur9r^ 
CR, 
Delinquency, 91,065 ! 



Erroneous AsseHsmenta,. 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Taxes Refunded, 

Paid at State Treasury,^ 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer,. . . . 



J90 0O 

907 5f 

40 7» 

30 

496 

6,172 84 

87,097 7» 



Wk. M. CLAPr, Auditor. 

DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 

Assessed by Treasurer 

Delinqaencies Collected,.. 



No. 66. Noble County. 

John McMcans, 7V«M»rer, 
CR 

83,045 46 Delinquency, 8660 22 

18 42 Erroneous AssessmenU, 16 2S 

243 64 Treasurer's Fees 109 06 

TBXes Refunded 2100 

Paid at SUte Treasury 15 13 

Mileage 26 OO 

Paid State Treasurer 2.459 86 



$3,307 52 



83,307 52 



Joseph M. Vamcc , Auditor, 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate 

Assessed by Treasurer, 

Delinquencies Collected,... 



No. 5T. Ohio County. 



83,061 72 
26 81 
170 82 



83^9 35 



John B. Chaft, Treasurer^ 
CR. 

Delinquency, 8375 70 

Erroneous Assessments, 76 99 

Treasurer's Fees, 144 41 

Taxes Refunded, 2 40 

Mileage, 16 00 

Paid State Treasurer, 2,663 85 



83,279 35 



No. 66 

JcBBifiAH Wilson, Auditor^ <x. off. 

Amount of Duplicate, 85,845 61 

Assessed by Treasurer, 73 71 

Delinqoencies Collected, 208 65 



Orange County* 

BiNJAifiN PoLBXN, Treasurer. 
CR, 

Delinquency, 8394 37 

Erroneous Assessments, 90 37 

Treasurer's Fees, 247 00 

Taxes Refunded, 4 94 

Mileage 16 00 

Paid State Treasurer, 5,434 49 



86,126 07 



86,]i%97 



No. 69. Owen County. 

Isaac E. Johnson, Auditor. 
DR. 
Amount of Duplicate, 84,83293 



\ by Treasurer,. 

Costs and Penalties, 

Delinquencies Collected,. 



3150 
800 
819 42 



$5,691 94 



GxoKoc Parks, Treasurer. 

CR. 

Delinquency 8975 13 

Erroneous Assessments, 23 37 

Treasurer's Fees...... JQI 40 

Taxes Refunded, 8 04 

Advertising, 12 

Mileage, 832 

Paid Ntate Treasurer, 4,43656 



85,691 91 



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S3 



JoiKPn Potts, JMiifr. 

DR. 

Amount of Duplicate 

Anessed by Treasurer, ... . 
Delinqaencies CoUected.. .. 



No. 60. Parke County. 

Milks W. Hart, Treaiurer 
CK. 

•6,37556 Oelinquency, $54456 

109 53 Brroneous Assessments, 346 83 

51343 Treasurer's Fees, 31542 

Taxes Reninded, S834 

Mileage, 10 40 

Paid State Treasurer, 7,942 08 

«0,088Sfi 



$0,088 52 



Wm. Vax WXNKI.B, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 

Aesesse d by Treasurer, 

Belinquenciei Collected,.... 



No* 61* Perry County* 

John C. Shokk4Kcs, TVsMnrer. 
I CR- 

$2,408 34 , Delinquency $29037 

381 Treasurer's Fees, 12915 

126 31 1 Taxes Refunded, 2111 

Mileage, 25 00 

Paid State Treasurer, 2,07283 



$2,53P 46 I 



$2^38 46 



No* 69* Pike County* 



JoatPH P. Glszxr. Jiuditor. 
DR. 
Amount of Duplicate, $2,697 44 



Assessed by Treaaurer.. 
Delinquencies Collected,. 
Over paid, 



30 90 
310 95 
170 50 



$3 225 79 



Albzandr LtMLiM, Ty$asurer, 
CR, 

Delinquency $48451 

Treasurer's Foes 170 36 

Mileage 2000 

Paid State Treasurer 2.55292 



$3>22S79 



S. W. Smith, JHditpr, 

DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 

AMMsed by Treaaurer, 

Delinquencies collected,. •• 



No* G3. Porter County* 

£. £. Campbell, Treasw§r 
CR 

$2.34412 Delinquency, $42294 

539 Treasurer's Fees 8696 

13340 Taxes Refunded, 292 

Paid at Stete Treasury, 33 89 

Mileage 26 00 

PaidSUte Treasurer, 1,91018 



$2,482 91 



t8.4a2si 



No. 04* Posey County* 



Tboxas F. Prosbbk^ Auditor, 

DR. I 

Amount of Duplicate, f 6,208 95 

Assessed by Treasurer. 18 38 

Delinquencies Col lected, 1,031 94 



$7,259 27 



Delinquency,. 
Erroneous AftsesHinents,. 

Treasurers' Fees, 

Taxes Refunded, 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer,. ... 



Jqhn M. Sandbrs, lyeaouror 
CR. 

.... $J,828 82 

22 57 

32973 

5 50 

66 72 

5,11193 



$7,259,27 



Job* PfeAftBOM, Auditor. 
DR, 

Amount of Duplicate, 

Delinquonciefl Collected,. .. 



No. 66* Pnlaski County* 



1934 96 
169 59 



$1,104 57 



"Wm. C. BaKITbtt, T^euourer 
CR. 

Delinquency, $430 92 

Treasurer's Fees, 36 50 

Mileage, 16 00 

Printing, 5 00 

Paid State Treasurer, 616 15 

$1404 57 



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84 



JoiBra H. Farley, Jinditor. 
DR. 

Amoant of Dnplicate, $9,248 55 

Araeiied b7 Treatarer, 58 28 

Gosti and Pen&Uiefl 48 60 

DelinquenciM Collected, 437 68 



No. 60. Pntnam County* 

Edward R. Kkrchbtal, TrBtuwer, 
CR. 

Delinquency,. $1,424 43 

Treaaurer's Fees, 340 61 

Taxes Reftindcd 2 40 

Mileage 6 40 

Paid State Treasurer 8,013 07 



$9,787 11 



$9,787 11 



Nathan Garrkt, Jhtditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, $5,172 25 

Assessed by Treasurer, 96 61 

Delinquencies Collected, 1 ,017 13 



No. 67* Randolph County* 



$64215 99 



Thomas W. Ribcb, TVeasurer, 
CR 

Delinquency, '. $1,387 11 

Erroneous Assessments 20 95 

Treasurer's Fees, 20134 

Taxes Refunded, 39 88 

Advertising, 41 66 

Mileage, 12 80 

Paid State Treasurer, 4,512 25 

$6,215 99 



No« 68* Ripley County 

JsrrRRioif Srsvtifi, AudiUr. 
DR. 

Amoant of DnpUcate, $6,037 78 

Assessed by Treasurer 10 24 

Delinquencies Collected, 257 51 



$6,305 53 



Elijah Starr, Trtwwrer. 
CR 

Delinquency, '. $1,159 99 

"" 336 19 

25 04 

51 82 

13 07 

12 49 

4,806 9J 



Treasurer's I^i 
Taxes Refunded,'. . . . . 

Advertising, 

Printing, 

Mileacre 

Paid State Treasurer 



$6,305 53 



JsssB D. Carkxchacl, JiudiUr. 
DR. 

Amount of DnpUcate $12,902 28 

Assessed by Treasurer, 36 64 

Delinquencies Collected, 150 36 



No. 68. Rush Coanty, 



John E. Roc, Auditor. 



$13,089 28 
No* 70. Scott County. 



Gborok W. Branm, Tieaawer. 
CR. 

Delinquency, 716 12 

Rrroneous Assessments 57 98 

Treasurer's Fess, 483 00 

Taxes Refunded, 4 00 

Mileage 6 40 

Paid State Tren surer, 11,821 78 

$13,089 28 



DR. 



John Close, Treasurer. 



Amount of Duplicate, $2,384 02 

Assessed by Treasurer, 1 73 

Delinquencies Collected 393 11 



CR. 



Delinquency, 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer,. 



John H. Stewart, Jtiditor. 
DR. 

Amount of 1 'vplicate $8,703 08 

Assessed by Treasurer, 01 95 

Uelinqueacies Collected, 83588 



$2,778 85 
No. Tl. Shelby County. 



$9,630 91 



John Carthill, 
■JR. 

Delinquency, 

Erroneous Assessments, 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Taxes Refunded, 

Advertising, 

Mileage, 

PaidState Treasurer, 

Balance due 



$622 94 

109 32 

16 00 

2,030 59 

$2,778 Ki 



Trea^wer. 

$1,432 18 

29 91 
311 58 

30 16 
50 00 

4 16 

6,976 54 

803 38 

f6«976 54 



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85 



JaVB C. Vbatch , Jf iMb7«r. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, $3^17 90 

D«finqiieiiciM Collected, 439 56 



Jio, 72. Spencer County. 

4;iulifiT0?UBii R. Reps, Treasurer. 
I CR. 

Delinquency, f703 86 

Erroneous AsseBBments, 37 09 

Treasurer's Fees, 147 60 

Taxes Refunded, 30 80 

Mileage 86 40 

Paid Slate Treasurer, 3,411 71 



$4,357 46 



$4,357 46 



No. 73, Steuben County. 
LsLAn H. Stoksk, Auditor. 
DR. 

AmooBt of Duplicate, $S,993 44 

Costs and Pfeaalties 37 00 

Dolinqaeacies Collected, 416 77 



•8,737 31 



Jessk J. Mcoo, Treasurer, 

CR. 

Delinquency, 

Erroneous Assesments , 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Taxes Refunded 

Advertising, , 



Mileage.... 

Paid State Treasurer.. 



9770 01 
54 07 
99 38 
31 96 
96 38 
33 00 

1J28 71 

$3,737 31 



A. B. Ellsworh, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amoant of Ooplicate, $5^635 06 

Assessed by Treasurer, 3 16 

Delinquencies Col lected, 701 77 



No. T4. St. Joseph County, 



$6 330 99 I 



Albert Momox, 7V«a#iir«r, 
CR. 

Delinquency $1,373 86 

Treasurer's Fees, 170 60 

Taxes Refunded, 3 00 

Printing, 5 85 

Mileage, 33 30 

Paid State Treasurer, 4,840 14 

Balance due, 13 35 



$8,339 99 



HsxET K. Wilson, j^iuftf or. 
DR. 



No. T5. SulliTan County. 



AmoDDt of Duplicate, $4,004 07j Delinquency 

DelinqnencT Collected, 160 OO' Treasurer's Fees,. 



Mileage,. 

Paid State Treasurer,. 



Joseph Gray, 7>-««««r«r. 
CR. 

$89952 

17157 

17 60 

3,076 S8 



RoBKRT 5. Lamb, AudUer. 
DR. 

AmouBt of Duplicate, $4,54833 

Aflsesaedby Treasurer, 79 65 

DeUaqoeBcies Collected , 60 31 



$4,164 97l 

No* 76. Switzerland County. 



$4,688 18 



William Hall, 

CR. 

Delinquency, 

Erroneous Aflsessments, 

Treasurer's Fees 

Taxes Refunded, 

Mileage, 

Paid State Treasurer, 



$4464 97 



TYea»wr€r. 

$49803 

87 46 

S0035 

340 

16 00 

3,889 95 

$4,688 18 



No. 77* Tippecanoe County. 

Nathab Wbsb, Auditor. 

DR. 

AmooBt of Duplicate, $13,707 93 

Assessed by Treasurer, 116 49 

i ostsand Penalties, 19 54 

Deliaquencies Collected, 3,691 53 



$]5;,535 48 



Abraham Fry, TVeasursr. 

CR. 

Delinouencies, 3,690 79 

Same Forfeited 83933 

Erroneous Assessments, 113 55 

Treasurer's Fees, 37874 

Taxes Refunded, 4003 

Mileage, 10 88 

Paid State Treasurer, 10,542 36 

$15,.5afi^ 



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86 



No. T8. Tipton C-omity. 

5. J. Jacxbok, JSuditor, F.z. off. 
DH. 

Amount of Duplicate, $!« 157 80 

A88e0Wdby Treasurer, 1286 

DeliDquencies Collected, 2S0 13 



«1,300 79 



John S. Rksblkr, Treasurer. 
CK. 

Delinquency. #345 33 

Erroneoufl Assessments, 3 37 

Treasurer's Fees, 74 59 

Mileage 6 40 

Paid State Treasurer, 961 10 

f 1,390 79 



JoHH W. ScoTT, Auditor. 

DR. 
Amount of Duplicate,.... 
Assessed by Treasurer, .... 
Delinquencies Collected,.. 



No. TO* Union Conntf* 



£4.593 79 
2123 
28 59 



CR. 

Delinquency, 

Krroneoua Assessments,. 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Printing, 

Mileage 

Paid State Treasurer,.... 



Wk. BktaX. 7V«a««r0r. 



94,64361 I 



t905 6D 

270 

Sl^' 12 

4 01 

II 30 

4,900 98 

94,643 61 



Wk. H. WALEXR,J«llilt«r. 

DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 97,31331 

Assessed by Treasurer, ••• • 7222 

Delinquencies collected, S59 51 



No. 60. Yanderbnrsh County. 



RoBSRT W. Dunbar, TrtasurT. 
CR 

I Delinquency 9694S9 

I Treasurer's Fees, 88106 

Mileage, 30 94 

Paid State Treasurer. 6,559 43 



97.545 04 I 



97,545 04 



McLViif p. LowRT, Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 95,799 35 

AsBOisedby Treasurer, 19 88 

Delinquencies ^'oUected, 340 93 



No. 81. Vermillion County. 



96,160 16 



William Utter, Treaourer. 
CK 

delinquency, 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Mileage, 7 

Paid State Treasurer, 



9550 84 

S30 91 

14 96 

5,363 45 



$6,160 16 



No. 82. 

Wills N. Hamiltoii , Auditor, 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 910,797 79 

AsflesBed by Treasurer, 5700 

Costs and Penalties, 43 77 

Delinquencies Collected, 3S134 



Yigo County. 

N. F. CrNNiNOHAX, TVeaourer, 
CK. 
Delinquency 91»022 39 



911j319 90 



Erroneous Assessments,. 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Taxes Refunded, 

Mileage.... 

Paid State TreMurer,.... 



4131 

382 43 

14 00 

11 SO 

9,748 57 

911>919 90 



No. 88* Wabash County < 

WiLLiAK Stcslc, Jr., Auditor. 
DR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 99.673 40 

Asaessedby Treasurer, 6139 

Delinquencies Collected, 369 12 



96,10400 



Brastcs Bimobam, Treasurer. 
CR. 

Delinquencies, 9716 22 

Erroneous Assessments, 39 78 

Treasurer's Fees, 20800 

Taxes Reftmded, 1S98 

Mileage, 16 00 

Paid StaU Treasurer 5,11102 



96,104 00 



No. 84. Warren County. 

Waltcr B. MiLLKR, Auditor, JaMEB J. McAlillt, Treasurer. 

DR. r CR. 

Amount of Duplicate, 94,41381 Delinquency, 955289 

Assessed by Treasurer, 1191 Treasurer's Fees, 17179 

Delinquencies collected, 33834 Mileage, 1300 



94^4 06 



Mileage,. 

Paid State Treasurer,. 



3,927 38 
$4^4 06 



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87 



J. W. B. MooKK.^wiit^. 
DR. 

Amoaat of Duplicate, $3,948 45 

Asuesaed by TTeamrer 6413 

Df Uoquenciea C ollected, 3 J 41 



$4,043 96 



No. 89. WftTrick County. 



Natharibl C. Pomi, TrMuurtr, 
CR. 

Delinquency, $15351 

£rroneou;i AssessmenU, S3 39 

Treasurer's Fees 19197 

Tajces Reftinded, ssq 

Mileage,... ^ 9880 

Paid State Treasurer, 3,643 45 



$4*043 98 



No, 

W. r. DkPacw, AudUor, Ex. off, 
DR. 

Anioont of Haplicate 

A«»cued by Treasurer 

i>t Unqnenciea Collected, 



Waskisgtoii Coniity. 

John McMahan, TVsMsrsrr 
CR. 

$9,40478 Delinquency, $40SSSr 

77 85 Erroneous A 98esHmeots 56 07 

15811 Treasurer's Fees 340SO 

Taxes Refunded, 372 

Mileage, 15 qq 

Paid State Treasurer 8,87380 

Balance due 2,00 

$9,700 74 



$9i700 74 



No. 87. Wayne County, 

Tmokas Asajh, JtudU^r. 

DR. f 

Amomt of Duplicate, $16,786 12 

A aaeaeed bj Treasurer, 10369 

Deiinquenciee Collected, 87358 



AcaiLLSs Williams, TV-eoMrsr* 

I Delinquency, $8,18438 

Erroneous Assessments, 67 3? 

Treasurer's Fees,.. 58995 

, Mileage, 1000 

' Paid State Treasurer, 16,91179 



$19,763 39 



$19,703 39 



No. 88. Wells County. 

Uwu S. Gson, dfiidte«r. , 
DR. 

Amoont of Doplicate, $3,721 80 

A Mcesed by Treasurer, 3936 

Delinquencies Collected, 700 48 



$3,470 54 



HimtT CouRTKBT, TVsMnrsr, 
CR. 

Delinquency, $71234 

Erroneous A ssessmentS) 75 19 

Treasurer's Pees, ,. 9639 

Taxes Refttnded,. 50 00 

Mileage, le 19 

Paid SUte Treasurer, 2,53049 



No. 89. Wkite County, 

B&JcsoN McCoxVACOiiT, ^wditor, 
DR. 

Amoant of Duplicate, $1,95672 

A«eMed by Treasurer, 1064 

i)«Uuquencies CoUected, 144 35 



Jambs C. Rstnolm, 
CR. 

Delinquency, 

Erroneous A ssessments, 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Mileage, 

Paid SUte Treasurer, 



$3,47054 



$51200 
3318 

87 77 

15 90 

1,46359 



K. H. VuiDKKLicB, Auditor, 
DR. 

Amoant of Duplicate , $3,375 85 

Delinqnendee Collected, 347 44 



$2,723 29 



$2,11171 

No. 90. Whitley County. 



C. W. HUOHH, 

CR. 

Delinquency, 

Erroneous A ssessments, 

Treasurer's Fees, 

Paid at State Treasury, 

Mileage, , 

Paid State l^asurer,. 



$2,111 n 



TVMMirsr.^ 

8294 80 
38 02 
104 68 
12 07 
23 00 

2,250 09 

$2,73329 



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STATEMENT NO. VII. 

Borrowers of Trust Funds for the year ending Oct. 31, 1850. 
UNIVERSITY FUND. 



Date of Morigagt. 


Names of Bomnoers. 


Amount Loaned. 


Nomnber 6, 1849, - 


John F. Hunt, - . - - 


150 00 


December 8, 1849, 


Charles L. Mumy, - - - 


200 00 


Janaary 3, 1850, - 


Thomas E. Holbrook, 


260 00 


January 29, 18S0, 


200 00 


January 30, 1650, - 


Ooo. M. Beswick, 


500 00 


Febraary 4, 1850, 


John Hlmns, .... 
David F. Rittenhonse, - 


150 00 


February 14, 1850,. 


300 00 


February 18, 1850, - 


Anthony Holmes, ... 
Robert Smith, .... 


150 00 


Fcbroary 18, 1850, - 


200 00 


February 18, 1850, - 


Henry Myers, - - • - 


300 00 


Fehniary 19, 1850, - 


James Jones, .... 


250 00 


Febroary 36, 1850, - 


John Sheddrick, 


500 00 


February 28, 1850,- 


Isaac Parker, .... 


200 00 


Mareh 1,1850, - 


Reuben Gundrum, ... 


200 00 


March 12, 1850, - 


Julius L. Benson,. ... 


175 00 


March 12, 1850, - 


A. M. Hicks, .... 


100 00 


March 28, 1850, - 


Jacob Dunham, .... 


250 00 


March 28, 1850, - 


Hiram R. Gaston, - . - 


300 00 


Match 28, 1850, - 


R. M. Fatter«>n, - • - 


500 00 


March 29, 1850, - 


Enoch D. Hanna, - - - 


270 00 


March 29, 1850, - 


Andrew E. Richardson, 


200 00 


March 29, 1850, - - 


Samuel Stair, - . - - 


300 00 


April 10, 1850, - - 


Robert Fausett, .... 


150 00 


April 10, 1850, - 


Nicholas McCarty, - 


500 00 


April 12, 1850. - - 


Seth Bardwell, .... 


400 00 


April 15, 1850, - - 


Evan Ellis, . . . - 


250 00 


April 19, 1850, - - 




300 00 


April 20, 1850, - - 


Coburn & Roberts, . . - 


100 00 


April 26, 1850, - - 
Miy 10, 1850, . . 


S.F.Daniels, .... 


100 00 


C. S. HascaU, . - - - 


500 00 


May 13, 1850, 


E. Brown, 


500 00 


June 18, 1850, - 


Joseph Teeple, - - - - 


234 00 


AQg^29,1850, - 


Francis Kin^f, .... 


300 00 


SepL 2, 1850, - - 


James Blake, - . - . 


400 00 


S^t 2, 1850, - - - 


Thomas Rickards, ... 


375 00 


SepL 5, 1850, . - 


Wm. Thompson, ... 


210 00 


Sept 30, 1850, 


George Lowe, - - - - 
Total, ... 


100 00 




$10,074 00 




SURPLUS REVENUE FUND. 




Fefaniary2S,1850,. - 


John Carlisle, .... 

OONaxZSSIONAL TOWNSRIF TVKD. 


$500 00 


March 99, 1850, • 


James S. Brown, . - - - 


$253 30 



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96 



INDEX. 



Part, 

Geaeral Raceipts, 4 

Total ReceipU, 6 

General Ezpenditares, 6 

Ordinary Expenses, 6 

Hiscellaneoua Expenditures, 7 

Total Expenses 10 

Synopsis of Appropriations 11 

Foreign State Debt, M 

SUte Stocks, 15 

Canal Stocks, IC 

ToUl Stocks, 18 

Intereston State Debt,. 19 

Domestic Debt of the State, 19 

Interest Account, 31 

OutsUnding Domestic Debt, 8S 

University Fund, S3 

Saline Fund, 34 

Bank Tax Fund, 85 

Apportionment of Saline and Bank Tax Fund, 37 

Fund ft-om Militia Fines, 39 

Surplus Revenue Fund, 39 

Account withDeKalb County, 30 

Account -with "Wells County, f 30 

Account -with Lake County, 31 

Congressional Tov7nship Fund, 31 

Three Per Cent. Fund, 33 

Common School Fund flrom Sinking Fund, .' 33 

Indianapolis Fund, 33 

Sales of Lots in Indianapolis, 34 

Treasury Fund, 34 

Funds ft-om Estates without known heirs, 34 

Fundfor Hospital for the Insane, 34 

Fund for Deaf and Dumb Asylum 35 

Fundfor Education of the Blind 35 

INTERI^AL IMPROVEMENTS. 

"Works abandoned by the State, 36 

Works Surrendered to Companies, 36 

Madison and Indianapolis Rail Road 36 

State's Stock in same, 37 

Wabash and Erie Can al East of Tippecanoe, 38 

Wabash and Erie Canal West of Tippecanoe, 3S 

Eel River Cross Cut Canal, , 38 

Southern Division of Central Canal, 39 

Wabash and Ohio Canal, 39 

Wabash and Erie Canal under Trustees, 40 

Total Receipts and Expenditures of same, 43 

Tolls and water Rents of same, 44 

Wabash and Erie Canal Scrip, East, 46 

Wabash and Erie Canal Scrip, West, 47 

New Albany and Vincennes Road, 48 

Northern Division of Central Canal, 49 

Erie and Michigan Canal, 50 

General Remarks. SO 

Estimated Expenditures for 1851, 58 

Estimates for 1851 andlSSS, 54 

Modification of Revenue Laws, 56 

Tabular SUtements, 59 

Ab«rtjactof Duplicatesof 1890, 61 

Appendix, ^ 63 



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Poc. No. 9.] [Ptot. L 

GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE 



TO 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



STATE OF INDIANA, 



DECEMBER 31, 1890. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

1. t. CHAPMAN, 8TATB PRINTBR. 
1850. 
1D13 



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1 • 



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MESSAGE, 



GtHtlamn uf ikt Senate ^md JSn^e qf R^^rtH^'^imB : 

Yau ham agaiip ii^iemblad) a^oerdiiog to tba provwioai 
0(f our Conatitatioiii to doliberala upoa iha ioteresta of our people. 
Connected with vou, tosome extent, bjr ttic (PoQflilittttion, io yourdw 
ties aod labon, 1 nro^ifa you my beartjr ^QCMO^retiofi in ail that ia 
calculated to advaoce the welfare of our beloved State. 

During the past year, the nation has been called to mourn the d#r 
oease of its Chief ICe^trale. Zacbary Taylor waa a brave and 
sturdy soldier— a true pniriot* Death suddenly eniled bis e^entfiil 
career, in the midat of the oonvulaioos of Coiigreai, oanaeqoent up<H) 
the agitation and settlen^eat of subjectst the. conipIexUy and import* 
ance o( which, are unparaUeled in our history* His offi^'ial mantle 
fell quietly upon another. The miqe«ty of the * Constituiion ai^ 
liaws,aiidth|e wipNlom th^feof^ were sublii^ely manifestiod. They 
supplied the place which death bad made va<99t>* The Executive 
functions of twenty milUoos of freemen, passed iu a single day, into 
pew bands; yet the changet great as it was, only served to chastea 
agitation, instead of adding to the public eominotien^ £motions qf 
general ^rrow, in view oitbe national bereiivement« wefepredomin* 
ant; and the result eixbiUted alike the patriotic sympathies of the 
people; the strength and grandeur of our form of govea^npnent, an^ 
Its efficiencv to meet every emergency and crisis whieh can arise. 

During the last ye^r we have enjoyed within oupr borders, the blessK 
|ngs of general health. In some paiis of the St^te» we were vlsite4 
with that terrible disease, the Cholera^ wbioh, in other portions ot 
Iha country, has parrjed off thousands* Yet through the noercies of an 
overmim^ Providence^ but few among us fell victims to the destroy- 
er. With this excepMon» the past year has beea oae of health, hap^ 
pbess and geoeraJ prosperity. 

Nothing nas transpired since your acyourmnent, to interrupt the 
rigular action of all the departrnmits of government. The Jaws 
bave been toitbfuUy administered, respected and obeyed. 

I am gratified >o b«ii^ able to say,, that the oecesiary mean* to 



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100 

maet our January interest* has been promptly advanced by our fellow ^ 
citizens, through the energy ol* our county collectora, without bor ^ 
rowing of the banks. 

For the promptness with which our collectors have responded to ' 
the call of the State Treasurer, it is right that you authorise the Aud- 
ftor and Treasurer to make them some compensation. ^ 

The financial condition of the State is still improving. ' 

The ordinary expenses of llie . State Government, fof the fiscal 
year euding the 31sl day of October, 1850, were $83,615 10. 

The expenditures for the ensuing year, (exclusive of the expenses 
of the Convention,) are estimated, by the Auditor of State, at $80,- ' 
000. 

The whole amount of revenue paid into the State Treasury, dur- ' 
ing the past year, on all accounts, was $450,481 76, which exceeds 
the amount of the previous year, $18,197 98. i 

The total value of taxable property, as returned for 1850, is $137,- 
443,565, which is an increase over the previous ye^r of $4,014,504. 

The number of polls returned for loSO, is 149,986, being an in- 
crease over last year, of 6,S66. 

• I coneor fully with Mhe Auditor of State, in most earnestly catl- 
ing your attention to the subject of an improvement in the revenue > 
.system. i 

While the property of the man bf moderate means, the farmer, the 
mechanic, and the day laborer, is, from its very character, exposed ' 
to the eye of the Assessor, and is such as to enable him to estimate 
t(s value with accuracy, it cannot be doubted that a lai*ge amount of ^ 
invisible property, consisting of corporation stocks, moneys and 
credits, entirely escapes taxation. 

The whole amount of corporation stock assessed in the State for 
the current year, is$286,516; when, taking into consideration our 
numerous Plank Roads, Rail Roads, River improvements, Insurance 
companies, and Manufactories, it is safe to estimate the value of this 
description of property, at not less than three miHbns of dollars. 

In many cases, the same property when assessed for municipal ^ j 
purposes, is returned at a much higher rate of valuation, than whea 
fisted by the county Assessor. , 

In New Albany, the city assessment exceeds the county assess* , 
trient in the sum of $300,000; in Madison, by the sum of $565,407; 
and in Indianapolis, $657,990; making a total excess, in these three 
unties alone, of more than one and a half millions of dollars. 

Individual instances of erroneous assessment, are familiar to all. 
A case hns been brought to the attention of the Executive, whe!*e the 
property of a citizen was valued by the county Assessor at the sum 
(if $75,525; and upon his death, the some property was valued; in 
the settlement of h» estate, ot $356,917. 

' There is also a gi^ent inequality in the assessment of lands in con<^ 
tiguous counties ; to rectify which, can only be accui^tely done by ft 
State Board of equalieation,or by Boards \n the several Congress- 
ional districts. 



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m 

The true x]fmjOdy Air tjiis u\Mi,e o£ thio^ is, the adontigo of « %yw 
htm to assess, at its cash value, every species of real and persooal m^ 
late; such a one asio a single year« in oursister State, OhiOi increae^ 
ed the aggregate amount of the taxables of that State, from onehMO- 
ired aodnfty million/i, to four hundred and ten millions of dollars. 
Let the Assessor furnish each tax -paver a blank form, to be filled Uf 
by himself, with an enumeration of his property, to be verified by 
oath or affirmation ; and on refusal, auti^orise tk^ Assessor to add to 
the valuation such per centum as may be deemed. necessary. Ujider 
such a system, we' shall not only equalize the burdens of the people <<rf' 
the State, but swell our total of taxable^ to at least two hundred 
'milUons of dollars, thereby enabling us to redace the present rate of 
taxation. Property and wealth are the true bases of laxatioi), and 
the public burdens should rest upon them. , 

Owing to the construction of various works of Internal Improve- 
ment, and other caises, the value of real estate is. constantly cbangi^ 
ii^, and frequent asse^ments, under any system, will be necessary. 
The last valuation of r^l estate was made in 184$, and to secuie 
an equalization of the burdens of the State, a re-appraisement isim* 
peralively required. 

As the* Assa^i*s have a ri^hi to commence making assessments 
the first of January, if it is designed to change the present 9vstem» it 
is su^ested that steps be immediately taken to postpone such assessr 
ment until the first of March ensuii^. 

Through the politeness of Mn Meredith» V. S. Marshi^l, I am this 
moment advised, thoegh the return^ are not complete^ that our en^ 
tire population is about 988,000, being an iacrease, sinoe 1940, of 
unwaxds of three hundred thousand. The total valuation of Rea) 
Estate, (arming implements, and live stock, exclusive of other per« 
sonal property, as returned by the Marshal, is about two buadfed 
millions of dollars, being sixty-three millions over the eatire nierns 
ment for taxation. If to this were added other descriptions of peie- 
onal property, our entire valuation, could not be less than two hund- 
red and fifty millions of dollars. 

I kuowof no hiffher duty that a citisen owes to the inslitutiens ot 
Us country, than that of being just, not only to hie neighbors, but to 
the governimnt that shields and protects him. No gMd man wUl 
nfuse to pay for the support of his government When he pays, be 
should pav in proportion to what he has — aocordinf to his wealthi 
andhe willonao occasion refuse to declare ox affirm what thai 
wealth is. 

I trust, bef<»^ you fftam to yonr constituents, you will pais an 
efficient and practical system for the. assessment, and oollection of 
your revenue, by which you will obtain the just proportion levied up 
on the entire wealth of the State* 

There is no sqfc^^t. that our^people tf^e moie interest ta than 
thatpf the redttcUon i|nd final paynMOt of oqr State debt. They 
desire some practical system that will annually ^uce their debt. 
. It will be tiipe aqom^ M> provide a sinkipig ^od wbea we have 



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MtA* fMfths tb af>i>i^rfat6 Ih'^hMtt way; toA when yfn nhkW tikve 
niliy ftflUMMd and collected the revenue levfbd upon theentir6 wealth 
afHd property of the State, we shall have something to set apart M 
ihat purpose. 

As it wilii however, require time to perfect a system, it is propel 
Ihal you enter upon the consideration of this subject. My own 
ef^inioa is, that no intricate or per^lested plan of reijucing bm pub^ 
lie debt ton be b^eficial. Simple taxation is the qply remedy; an^ 
as neAr as can be, direct application of the money, when coll^tedv 
1^ dischlii^ the debt. 

In the establishnvent of a board to manage the funds, your oiiiceri 
^ State, with the aid of one commissioner elected bv the people, 
W^oukl be enUrely Sufficient The power given should be discretion- 
ary as to the investment of surplus funds, for obvious reasons. 

The financial abitrty of the State may be seen in what we iiave 
ftecompKsbed in the lasl nhie years, commencing with the suspension 
df our internal iHnprOTement system. In that period, with no other 
teeouroe but tairMion, we have liquidated, of our domestic debt, \h 
principal and interest, the sum of f3,339,15<, and have paid of in- 
terest on our foreign debt, including the January interesti 1851, thu 
•fim of fr3:),969; making a total of $8,iE68,49!5, or over $360,000 
Iper year, in addition to the ordinary expenses of the State, a sunt 
eqpiivalent to one hatf our present State indebtedness. 

By the year 1853, with the improtements proposed in our reve^ 
hu^ iystenn tli6 saving ^Sbcted by biennial sessions of the Legisia* 
tore, and the revenue to b6 derived from the Madison and Indianap- 
(»lis Railroad, it is estimated that we shall be able within that yeal* 
to appropriate the sum of $100,000 to the payment of the prmcr- 
pal of the forettta debt. A table has been prepared with great can9» 
tad k appended to this miessa^, assuming the t^venue of 1838 to 
to §600,000, diat the annual mcrease of revenue will be three per 
oemtum, that the surft of 9100,000 may be appropriated the first 
year for the payment of i^rincipat ; and that tnis sUm may be in* 
creased every year thereafter by the thi^e per c6ntum of increaafc> 
ited Ihs amount to'lred \t the interest account Under su6h an esti- 
liiale,--*and I belieVe it entimly practicable, th^ ^uUic debt wtH be 
Hipridftted \h seventtsen y^rs from the first paytnent. To show stit! 
tarther the practicabiRly of wtpteg but the debt tX the State at ah 
early day, ia taUe hai been prepared by the Auditor of State, on a 
lifi^reat taisits for which you are referred to his rbp6rt. 

We are progressing rapidly with works of public improvemeii^t. 
hi the past season* we have cotnpleted Four Hundred miles of Plank 
Wads, which have cost firom twelve to twentv-five hubdred dollaiii 
p^r liiile. Thei« are tome twelve hilindred tonl^ additional survey* 
ed and in progress. We have tvro hundi^ and twelve miles of 
ndlroaii in sucoessAil operation ; of whfdi, one hiitndred tnA twenty- 
$Bf^t we#e Completed the past yekr. There ans tnoft thah xmt 
thousawdkniles of Railhead snrvej^ed, And in a slate of progress. 
« There is no evfl fo M appr^^Mtd irom Mbb expenditure of me n 



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%f Md IftVbt tai})iMl Pfktok Mdds; They tiD lydill bf ^^ *»^ )aB<» 
ind eapitth The prote^ to our 0iiM people, nnd ^dnkeqdietiWf 
no surplus for the payment of interest on loans, gdes but bf \M 
OdttQtrjr. 

86 lonir as we confine ottr operations and expendittires dpon Rail^ 
nnids and work* of a sinriiiar character^ to indirtdoal enterprise ^nd 
enpiialt we haire the sorest guaranty ttmt the' investment will W 
aaade upon w^t of such a character as will pAy tiberallV for tM 
oost of their construction. While ft is not the provinOa of the Btf 
ecartiTO to dictate to his feMow citizens to what particnhtr wdrks j|^ri^ 
mte cnpltml and lenterprne Aould be directed* still it may not M 
iasppoper to say, at this 'tiRie> when the mind of the public Is iii 
stroaj^ly dtreded to railroad enterprises, that the dAnger to be apL 
prsbendad, is, tfaet i^orks ao en'ftr<eiy )c^l In their character as M 
dsMppoiYit 1he expectations of the stockholders atid the pnUlCf when 
oottstrected, will absorb the cbpitnland energy of the conntiy; and thut 
the satne mlffht be appropriated to greater advantage in works of i 
more general character. And ft is to be feared that there is tbO 
great a dispoMtion to canry on these works by subscriptions of cbr» 
porate cities and counties. From the evidence before me, there 11 
now one million of dotUirs of corporate stcick taken, in the State^ 01 
lailroade, by cities and cbontS^; and from the present exdtemeiit 
in diflbt«Bt parts bf this fihate^ the amMmnt wiH be laig^dly tncreauM 
the coming season* 

Sound policy ittctates that no muhieipal department, howe'^'er 
wealthy, shduld become associated with private companies for toy 
Ipnrpoae whatever. The appropriation ot the nsvenues of cities and 
counties to such purposes, is wholly foreign to the objects for wbidi 
municipal corporations are organized, and for which the power bf 
cazatibn is grdnted to them | and will lead b local embarrassmbaM 
and difficulties aitnilar to those iti which the Stdle became involved 
a fbw yeirft ago. 

If we shall hold a (brm and steady hand { confine investments itf 
ear pnbKu impnyvements to individual capital and enterprise; sho# 
dte capitalist at home and dbroadf by our actions tnd words, <bai 
we are determined to keep fatthfblly all past engagements $ that %^ 
regard State and county ck-edit^ not as mere empty sound and proiil* 
ite, bat that which is real and substantial and worth preserving M 
if we shaH do this, Indiana ViH sieadilv moveforwiird with increaiM 
ed energy; her rdsources i^ilt be deveUped at thto proper imd iteM 
timet and she wfll be enabled te preednt the greatbsf chain of m^ 
provemants of any State in th^ Union. But if in this hbiir, tM 
turning point in her second history of impro^mehfs, W6 bV9r^ 
leap the proper botindsii and in the mometit of etcitement, when Ifti 
dhMoal cabital is marking Hve whole map of the State #tth rathlMid 
Imes, we add miHions of Sib corpdmle stocks of comities, citteii abd 
tb#aihipat through 4 IftudAUe but mfirtakea zeal to advance thik da 
that ^orkf we shall repent Ibr years to eOHne thai we had pari of 
kt m the mMMt. We hdM ted such a lesson on Ihii iafa|eett tUtft 



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dill 

viB Awfii, k^ jmlHf ^igMble with, a lack of pradenc^ tf we •gaim 
fiill into a like difficulty, without having mack some exertion to a?oi4 
tuch a disaster. 

I recommend to your consideration, the propriety of making effi- 
cient provisions by law, for taking ao annual statistical account of 
the Agricultural and other industriol products of the State, in their 

rat material features. Hardly any subject of domestic policy can 
more important, whether we regard its effect upon our internal 
policy, or upon the just weight and character of the State as a mem^ 
ber of the confederacy. The attention of wise men has long been 
directed to this subject. ?Vot only has one or more of our sister 
States taken some action; but the General Gov^nment is proposing 
to lend its aid in accoipplishing the object But while I ap[M'ove 
the spirit which we must suppose actuates and influences the Genar* 
al Government, I doubt the expediency of relying solely upon its 
action. Why should we be continually kicking to the Capital of 
the Nation for information as to our own wealth, resources axMl 
means! This is a subject of econQm;|r in its largest sense; involving 
the certain knowledge of our material iaterest and ability. Such 
l^owledge is of the first importance to the successftil jprosecution of 
ij|di vidua! and subordinate business affairs; but it is ot vastly great* 
er consequence to the just rsgulation of the collective interest of 
}he State. It should therefore be acquired by the State, under its 
own laws, and through its own officers. 

Importapt a$ this measure undoubtedly is, it is easy to accomplish 
it, at trifling expense. A bureau of statistics can be engrafted upon 
U>e office of Secretary of State, or some other State office, and tiie 
prppisr blanks may be prepared by such bureau, and transmitted 
thence to the county assessors, or some other county officer, to be by 
tkem filled^ as prescribed by law,apd returned to the Central Office^ 
to be compiled for the information of the General Assemblv. Thus 
could be ascertained the number of acres of land under cultivation; 
the quantity of cereal grain, and other crops produced ; the number 
of hones, cattle, h<)gpi, sheep, Alc^ the number of mills and manu- 
fS»ctories ; the amount of capital and value of machinerv employed 
therein; and the aggregate annual products, especially in breadstufis; 
statistics of the more important branches of mechanical labor; of 
the extent and progress of railroads, plank roads, canals, &a; with 
their coat and income per mile, together with any other iteme of 
creat and essential value. In this way we may receive annual in* 
formation on the subject of our schools, number of teachers, num* 
ker of pupils in attendance, the number not in attendance^ the 
amount of the pav of teachers, the kinds of books used at schools, 
the condition of the School Fund, and full details of the operation 
ef your entire school system. Thus can be established a system of 
fiactical statistical information, relative to the resources and capital 
of the State, hij^ly interesUag in a moral and social aspect, and 
tery important in its bearing upon our domestk policy, and upqn 
im cbaiaeter aad pre4it (4 ti>e State gQiendlyt It would afibrd me 



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m 

gnstpleaaiira if Iib)i«M^ wmH Ifad off iii> ^h^ dsnaiB^tkm of meii 
a system as a perimaneDt part of our doi|>«3Uc pouoy. 

Tbe State Unrviarsityy ai^d the other institutions of learniog, are 
io a finarl&liiDg condition/ More than twelve hundred yooag mea 
have been in regulc^r attendanoe at the dtferent colleges of the State 
during the pasit year. It is gratifying to know that at every sub- 
mission of the school question to the ballot box, there has been mao^ 
ifested by tbe people an* increasing interest for the permanent es- 
tablisbmept of an uniform system of common schooU, 

Tbe history of the past speaks to us in strong language* — th|it 
.where man's moral qultif ation is nf^lected, there, life, liberty and 
property are unsafe. It is the obvious and plain duty of ffoverrnnent 
to provide for the educatioa of. the whole people; and to secure 
general intelligence among men, they should begin to learn while 
they are children. \x is therefore bacomiog in us, as representatives 
of the people, to concentrate all our efforts for the establishment of 
commoa schools in every neighborhood, for the improvement of 
every child in the school district, in which should be adopted a uni^ 
form system, for every class of oar youth, while we leave the county 
iostitotions and colleges to individual or associate enterprise. By 
sttch a system it is believed tbe object will be best promoted. One 
thins is certain : If we pay not for the education of the boy, we shall 
surely pay doub}e fpr the ignorance of the man. 

Your attention is called to the many valuable suggestions con- 
tained in the reports of the Trustees and Superintendents of our 
benevolent institutions. Indiana according to her population, this 
day educates, free pf all expense, a greater namber of mutes by 
thu-ty-three per cent., than any other State in tbe Union* 

It is gratifying to knowy thai of the entire number, who faav^ 
been placed in the Insitne. Asylum within six OK^nths after the attacks 
ninety per cent. hav)9 bo(^n cured; and of those who enter the 
Institution within one year after becoming insane, eighty per qent 
tre restored to their friends clothed^ and in their right mind. 

Tbe economy and prudence with which the Blind Asylum is man- 
aged, are worthy of all praise* ' 

The policy adopted by Indiana, in admitting into her benevolent 
imUtutions, all classes and cionditions of her unfortunate fellow be* 
ings, without regard to property, has been followed b^ other States 
iu the West. Thos^ that have not, are now making ^fhvU to occupy 
the ssme ground. 

These institutions are the monuments of Indiana's benovolenoo, 
sod it is your duty, as no doubt it will be. your pleasure, to sustain 
them by liberal appropriations* Mo part of the burdens imposed oa 
our people is paid with more cheerfulness. It is, however, indis- 
pensable, that you provide suitable cJiecks io the eaqpenditure of tbe 
public money thus appropriated. It may be worthy of your exam^ 
inatifm, whether tbe adoptioa of poinis .siMch provisioiis as follow, 
would not ha beneficial; 

1st That tbe SiiperintandeiMs and otbar.9$coni should g^ve bon4f 



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HI 

may come into lh6ir hands. 

!^* That there should be ttdopud a bniloHh rale for the efocliott 
6f Trustees for all the ihstltnttohst and that ho Bdard of Trusteed 
should have the power to fill Tac^neies in their own body. 

3d. That no Superintendent or oflker of these institutions aho^M 
hold the office of Trustee. 

4th. That in the dbbursemenl of funds to sustam ilfese institn* 
tionsy the money should be paid out upon warrants, drawn by tbi 
Auditor upon the Trearareir, to the persbn entitled to receive tiie 
same; following the rdei as ftr afS prticticabfey by which payuitetls 
tLtb now made to the o^icers of State. 

The propriety of insuring these valuable buildihgs is worthy ot 
your consideration. 

The cultivation and improvement of our isoil is that upon wbidi 
the other branches of business rely for support, and is the true souree- 
6f all wealth. The system that adds to tfie stock of information iii 
Agriculture will promote the welfare of the State, and deserves td 
be encouraged by the Lmslative I>epartment 

The establishment of a »tAte Board of Agriculture^ to consist, say, 
ef nine miembers, for the express purpose of organizing a State A^- 
ricoltnral Society, would be calculated to bring intb existence, in mb 
seve^til counties of the State, County Societies, that Wbuldbe atrxU-^ 
inries to the State assoMttion. 

We are an agricult\giral peopfo. Our climate, aoil, and isituationi 
make us so ; and the adoption of a systeVn that will bring our peo^ 
pie together annuaHv at some point in the State, Where we can pre-* 
sent the most vlilueble specimens of science and art, especially tiM 
^efol in^entbns of labor-saving impiements of husbandry $ end6rs: 
ing the character of the improvements; awHrding pt(miiums, eiUier 
or money, diplomas or medals ; exhibiting the stock, grains, And 
productions of 6ur State, would ho doubl create d spirit ^ emula' 
tion in our pe<^le, and be well adapted to further the interests of 
our growing State. 

We are not aware of the amount annnilly ex^iided by our peo« 
f4e for stock, implements and productions of 6^er iStates, that can 
be saved in a few years by the prqMr orgatriasathm of anch County 
and State Agriculrural Societies. 

To aid in this enterprise, it h suggested, tftal the tax collected 
upon travelling circuses, menageries, and public shoWr, in this States 
be paid to the County Treasuiers, thence into the State TrbaSUrV, to 
be set apart expressly as a fond at the disposal of the SUite Bbetd of 
Agriciulture, to pay premiums at the annual Mrs. 

It is believed that you can saMy appropriate one thousand dollaitr 
tb this purpose in antici^tton of the receipts (Mia this sotitrce thD 
cotriing yeat. 

I mention Witti pttasuHs, M Ab oeeiaiM, tM fact that a few ef 
the enterpruiuff citizens of Indiana are preparito td attend the gM3 
industHal exhibiUen of tH netiM^ tt Leiidott, m May next, and te 



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dirry iMrift Uietn spacfmiiifs oF their iUdfi kai labor, add samples o? 
tbe proditeti<ms of otr soH. The propriety of etpressihg* in som^ 
)irop>er itaViher, your approbation of stich ttk ehterprise is worthy 
6f yoor cofisidaratioia. 

Tout attention til asain earhestty invited to the importance ot 

Srovidh^for a tliorou^ geological and topographical survey of the 
tate. The interests of agriculture, manufactures and commercef 
alike demand it. That Inmana is rich in mineral wealth is a fact 
that each succeeding year more and more demonstrates. We havip 
vast beds of coal and iron, and recent developments indicate that 
we have many of tbe more precioufs metals. When we shall send 
oat men of high scientific attainments to explore our hills and our 
prairies, to analyse our ores and our soils, and lay barie the hoW 
eokicealed riches of our mines, we shall havie takeb the first and 
nuist irtiportant step in that great race of industrial progress which 
w31 place Iiidiana in her true attitude. Her position oh the map 
of thb great valley is commanding; and if, under a kind Provi* 
dence, we escape the perils that threaten to separate us from the 

G«t sisterhood of States, whose interests are so olended by geoloff: 
U geogl^pbical and commerciial affinities, the next ten years will 
place her, as an agricultnral and it manufacturing State, by the sidd 
of Pennsylvania. 

Out ipc»licy is to rely unoh oiir own resources hither than upon 
any aid from the General Government* While we do thli, our in- 
terests are undisturbed by the shocks isind struggles of political par- 
ties. Our strength and our independence He in our great agricultu- 
ml and manufacturing resources. ' We wabt more wowledge — vri 
Want a map whid)i not ohly defines our t)OunN[aries — pur area— our 
corporate subdivisions, and the course of bur rivers; — but we want 
a map which will tell us the depth of our coal seams — the best lo- 
calities for our iron furnaces-^tne extent and value of our marble 
and stone cpiaifies-^the woith of our exhaustless quantities of tim« 
ber, and the true cbaractrtr of our soils. We are now groping id 
eomparatrve dariAiess ; and while otKei* States, by thd aid of science^ 
are unfolding neif and hitherto unknown elemek^ts of wealth, wd 
are trasting these interests tb chatvce and individual ehterpiise. 

I submit to you, "Whethef*, if we regard the measuHe in the light ot 
mete revenue alone, it is not worthy of your deliberate and favora^ 
Me conskleratioii. And while looking at the cost of the work, you 
will not fail to see, that in a fbw years it Wotild bring such an in« 
crease of population and capital as i^ould reduce the general bur- 
thens of the people four-fold the amount of the expenditure. I shall 
hiy before you a priuted circular letter addressed tb me on this sub* 
jbct, and sigiied by a vt^rv \irg)d number of th6 most intelligent ^hdf 
anterpriabg citizens of tro Slate. The Views expressed in this let*' 
tisr w31 attract your attention, and, 1 doubt hot^ commahd ybui^ 
livor. 

Some of tho avib of local leaislation have developed tbemselvei 
ia the practical efiects of the Act giving exclusive jurisdiction of 



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certain crimioal oSboces defined bv the general lawa of the State, to 
justices of the peace, in several of the counties. Among these of- 
fences is that of assault and batteiy. Under the act concerning 
crimes and punishment, in the Revised Code, an assault and battery 
may be punished by a fine not exceeding one thousand dollars, and 
imprisonment for any term of time not exqeeding six months. By 
the Act conferring exclusive jurisdiction on justices of the peace, iA 
the counties alluded to, no fine can be imposed higher than twenty^ 
five dollars; and thus, in tliose counties, an assault and battery, no 
matter how aggravated, cannot be punished by a fine exceeding that 
fimount. Another bad efiect of this Act is, that upon the trial of 
an indictment in a Circuit Court for an assault and battery vriib in* 
tent to commit a felony, if the mtent to commit a felony is pot, in 
the opinion of the jury, proved, the Court has no jurisdiction to in* 
flict a punishment for the simple assault aud battery. But when the 
case is dismissed for that cause and comes to be re-tried before a 

I'ustice of the peace, the justice may think the intent to commit a 
elony sufficiently proved, and in that case, he, also, would be divest- 
ed of jurisdiction. Thus in bandying the case to and fro, the offend*^ 
er may escape punishment altogether, and that, too, when his of- 
fence is of the most a|;gravated character. This subject requurea 
your immediate attention. 

The subject of a small appropriation annually to the State Libra- 
ry, sufficient to pay for one or more of the newspapers published in 
each of the counties of this State, to be regularly filed and bound, 10 
worthy of your attention. In this way, we shall, for an inconsider* 
able sum, obtain a history of our State, that will be of great advan* 
tage in after times. You will then have in detail the general and 
local policy of counties, in connection with the opinions of men; 
the history of individuals and families ; addresses ; notices of all 
kinds; marriages, deaths, &c., besides important local statistics not 
easily obtains from other sources. How hijghly would we prize 
full files of papers, which have been published in our State since the 
year 1804— since 18207 Thev would be more sought after tham 
any work found in the State Librar)r. By tliis means, you would 
preserve the religious, moral and political history of our State, from 
year to year ; and although you would have a vast variety, much, 
of but little value ; yet, it u from this alone, in after times, that our 
history is. to be written. To this, the historian must go, to do jus- 
tice to the men and the age of which he writes. 

The work on the Wabash and Erie Canal, under the judicious 
QianagementoftheTrusteeSfhas been prosecuted steadily towards com'* 
pletion, according to their plan as submitted in their first report to the 
General Assembfy. By the contracts which they have made, the 
canal will be finished to EvansviUe within the time, after making 
lust allowance as provided for in the act, for the delays which have 
been occasioned by Providential causes not within the control of the 
Trustees. 



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m 

Banning the woiic at Coal Creek» irberd the State lert it, they: 
kavennished and brought into use seventy-niDe miles from that place, 
to Point Commerce. 

The Newberrv and Maysville divbion, extending from. Point 
Commerce to Blaysville, forty-nine miles, is nearly finished ; and 
but for the interruptions occasioned by cholera among the laborers 
on the line during the last two seasons, wpuld have been finished iu 
dme for the navigation of next spring. 

Bvthe report of the Trustees, it appears that one hundred and fifty 
of the laborers on the Kne died of cholera during the last summer. 

The entire balance of the line from Maysville to Evansville is 
under contract, and the work in progress, to be completed by the 
first day of November, 1852. 

The length of the line now under work from Point Commerce to 
Bvansville, is one hundred and eleven and a half miles; upon which 
there has been employed, during the past season, an eflicient force 
of near two thousand men. 

It is gratifying to find from the reports of the Trustees, that not- 
withstanding the great advance in the price of labor which has ta« 
ken place since they coihmenced the work, the actual cost ot 
the completion will not materially exceed the estimates which were 
made in 1845, prior to the transfer. 

The cost, according to contract prices, from Coal Creek to Evans- 
ville, — one hundred and ninety and a half miles, (exclusive of dam- 
ages for the right of way,) will not vary much from $3,012,000* 
The actual sum cannot be known, until the contracts are closed and 
the work paid for. 

The certain and speedy completion of this canal, the longest in 
the United States, through the territory of Indiana to the Ohio riv- 
er; — a work which has ever been regarded with such interest by 
oar citizens, and the partial completion of which has already con- 
ferred such direct benefits upon so large a portion of those 
living along and near to it, and upon the whole State in the addition 
whicn it has been the means of making to its population and taxable 
property; — is a subject of ffincere congratulation. And when we 
consider that this result has been attained by the agency of the hold- 
ers of our bonds, and by means advanced by them at a time of great 
embarrassment, it would seem to add to the obligation resting upon 
OS, if any thing can add to the sacredness of State faith and State 
honor, an additionaPreason for maintaining with scrupulous fidefity 
the arrangements with them, and throwing around them every pos- 
4bie security, — as their only reliance for pro'eciion and indemnity 
rest upon it. 

The i-e venues of the finished portion of the canal show a gratify- 
iocincrease in its trnflic and usefulness. 

The tolls received tor the year ending November 1, 1850, are re- 
ported at 9157,158 38; being an increase of $22,499 35 over the 
tolls of the previoQS year. 



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Th<( Tnum^ Htffy^ ^ nh erf 8!MM 0-l(MI teres, of 1m4 n 
the Vincennes district; and 33,986 32-lQd acres in the Lofanspcirl 
office, durinff the year; exhibiting an increasing demand of cani^t 
lands for settienient 

it cannot be ei^pected that a work of the magoitode pf this, in- 
volving so many interests, can be prosecuted anid completted without 
causes of complaint on the part of some of our oitiaeiUL These 
complaints are made to the Executive department, frequently acr 
epmpanied with the request that suits he broi^U 

It is suggested that you adopt some, rules to be. observed in all a^ 
|dications7or relief by si^ts. The. views of ooiy piedecessQr on fhii 
fubject, are worthy of your careful consideration^ 

On the twenty-eighth day of September, 1850, Congress, paased s 
Ii^w ffrantins to each State, for a specified purpose, the swamp or 
overflowed lands within their several borders, then belonging to the 
General Government. On receipt of the law* a correspowienc^ wip 
opened with the General Land Office at Waihington* A reply was 
communicated to me on the 2Sth day of October ; and on the 3Qt(i 
day of the same month, a circular was issu^ to each of ths( Cou&tjir 
Surveyors throughout the State. Additional instructiona hnviog 
been received on the S9th day of November ; they were embodied 
in another circular, and on the succeeding day were also issued as 
above. Under these instructions, and circulars, the surveyors are at 
this time engaged in making the necessary examination of the tracts 
of land that we shall be entitled to under this law. A portion of 
them have discharged their duties, and made their reports; but it is 
probable that the entire work will not be completed before March oc 
April* 1851. From the best information I have received, the State 
will obtain, under this act, about One Million acres of landf f^M* the 
purposes named therein. It will be your province, at the present 
session, to provide bv law for the compensation of the surveyors and 
others engaged in selecting these lands, and to take such steps as will 
preserve them from waste, until such time as the patents shall be 
made to the State, and the L^islature shall have determined the 
manner in which they shall be disposed of. I have not sufficiently 
matured any system for bringing these lands into market, or other* 
wise disposing of them. This, with other matters relating tbereto^ 
may be made the subject of a special commiuiication. It would ac^ 
cord with my views, after the objects for which these ]aiu(s were 
granted are accomplishedt if the proceeds and residue were set apart 
to aid the Sinking Fund for the redemption of the State debt. 
. By the determination of the Commissioner of the General Land 
Office, the sales, by the several Land Offices, of the swamp and 
overflowed lands thus granted to us, will not be stopped or interfer- 
ed with, until they are ascertained and marked ofi'as *' State Lands'* 
upon their office plats. But that if anv such lands shall have been, 
or shall hereafter be, sold by such Land officers, the money received 
therefor shall be held for, and be paid to the State. I have alrei^dy 



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^ more» i su^wst tbat you provide by Ww, tha iMtbpd. o£ applyii^ 
br and receiving ibe Aionay arUing tberefrom. 

The State U under many oblifpitians to Hons, R,. W. Thempipil 
tnd John H. Bradley, for serticfs rendered a( Washington City ^ 
tba adoption of the rules for ibe s^^tion of tbeee iand«« 

Wa werei visited in the State PriBOO, the past seaAon* wilti 
the cholera. Tweoty-six of the^ convicts died. The Warden, Coif 
Lepuel Ford, and hu wife, £sll victims to the disease* He was. at 
his post of dnty^ aptivefy emagedv day and night, in administering 
^> the coinlbrts and wants oi the sick and dying. He was % useful 
man, eminently qti^ilified to discbaige th# duties of h^ offi^ His 
place will be difficult to fill 

I am gratified in being able to say that the prison was in an e:|*f 
cdlent condition; entirely cleansed ; and the physician and all others 
connected with the priso^i, nobjy did their duty during the prevaWncst 
of this disease. 

By the kindness of Miss Dix, that devoted friend of prisoj^* 
^r^ prison disciplii^ and suffering humanity, I had 9elfeted and 
purchased at the East, ior the use, of the prisoners, two hundred voU 
wnes of Religions, Historical, Agricultural and Bio|0[raphical works, 
which cost the sum ot one hundred and thirty-eight dollars i^od 
^igbty-ei^t ceots, which are kept neatly in a book case ; let out to 
the convicts regularly, who are barged with them ; and when re« 
turned, another is taken in its place. It is with pleasure I leaf^ 
that a large portion of the couyiots read with interest this excellent 
selection. 

Wisdom and humanity demand thai an appropriation of Fifty 
Dollars be oMide ^nually for the purpose of keeping up the Library* 
It is right and proper that men thus confined should be furnished 
with books, that tbey may employ their time in reading when nojt 
engaged in labor; I doubt not that the above expenditiKQ, altbo«|gh 
unauthorized by lawi will be approved by this enlightened body. 

The greater par; ^ the work on the new buildings has been oo^^ 
pleted, and we can now dispense with the duties of the Conniission^ 
er to superintend the Public BuiMiogs, so fiir« at toaBt« as to give the 
same in cbartfe to the Warden, who resides inside of the walls, ai^ 
who should be able to superintend all the ioiprovement/i we have 
to make. By pursuing this course, we shall save four bundred 4pl- 
Ian a year, and be able to pay your Warden one thousand dollars i^ 
yeai- for his services in disohargii^ the duties that have heretofore 
been in the hands of the two. 

There is some doubt under the present htw, how the Physician to 
the prison should be selected* My own opinion is, that be should 1^ 
appointed by the State, and be independent of the lessee. 1 th^e^ 
fore recommend that you provide for hi^ appointment ia \h^ 
(ature. 

Your aitentuM^ is caHed to the very able report Jm4^. by ^P. ^i^r 
Iter te the prison. 



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l^he highest number In the prison during the jmst year was ono 
hundred and fifly-foof. Of this namber, sixteen have been par- 
doned; — three o( them on account of insanity; five for good 
conduct, (the nardons being granted within a few weeks oT the 
expu'ation of their sentences,) and the remaining eight were par- 
doned upon the application of the Courts, Juries, and citizens, who 
were presumed to be well acquainted with each case recommended to 
the Executive. 

There is no duty devolving upon your Executive that is more era- 
barrassiag, and surrounded with greater difficulties than the pardon- 
ing power. With whatever care he may watch and guard its exer- 
cise, be is liable to great impositions. In view of my brief experi- 
ence on this subject, I have adopted the following ruie^ to be observ- 
ed as far as practicable in all applications. 

They are presented in this cx)mmunication with the view of sub- 
mitting them to you, and through you to our fellow citizens, believ- 
ing, that they may be worthy of being made the subject or Legisla- 
tion, at least of an advisory character. 

Ist. That in all applications for a pardon, notice should be given 
of the time when the same Would be made. 

2d. That those who represent the State upon the trial, should 
furnish at least the substance of the evidence. 

By adopting this course, the Executive will be relieved from deci- 
ding applications on ex parte petitions, letters, &c., and will have be- 
fore him the evidence on the trial. This course has been pursued in 
the State of New York, and the Executive, after one }'ear*s experi- 
ence, speaks in the highest terms of the wisdom of the law. 

It is respectfully suggested that power be given in the trial of ca- 
ses of larceny, to imprison in the County Jails or State Prison at 
the discretion ol the Jury, without regard to the value of property ; 
or, at least, increase the limit prescribed by law for the division be- 
tween grand and petit larceny. Intimately connected with this 
change in our criminal law, is the improvement in ihe regulations of 
our county prisons. By a very slight change in many counties, wo 
may have the piisoners engagea in useful occupation. Each county 
should be prepared with building Tor the reception of juvenile of- 
fenders, so constructed and furnished as to provide for the regular 
occupation of all the inmates. It is idle to talk of reforming the 
young man, who, for his first offence, has been convicted for 
stealing property of the value - of five dollars, and sentenced to two 
years* imprisonment in the State Prison, thus placing him by the side 
of the murderer. We must place the young and juvenile offender 
where his associations and intercourse are with those who will exer- 
cise an influence for good, and not with the old and hardened in 
erime. Our county prisons should be converted into workshops — 
into houses of industry — wearins the appearance of decency and 
order. Active employment should be required of all its occupants; 
for idleness itself often proves to be the school of vice. In this way 



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Ill 

W6 may not only reform the prisoners^ but we should compel thete 
to contribute to their own support, and to pay» by the sweat of the 
browt the penalty of the violated law, and cost of convictiony thus 
directly relieving the counties from a heary burden which they now 
pay to sustain those imprisoned. The convict can as well be made 
to perform labor for hb own support in your counties as in your 
State Prison. The individual convicted for the first offence; the 
youth; the juvMiile offender; or where the circumstances of ^e 
case seem to require at the hands of the jury of the county, that the 
imprisonment should be in the county jail;— your prisoner thus situ- 
ated will find, daily or weekly, kind parental advice, and the watch* 
fol care of those who take an interest in his welfiire; and our pris* 
ens will become what they should be, — places not only for punish- 
ment bat for refornaation. 

The State has an interest is what in called the Georgia LandSf sit- 
nated in the counties of Laurens, Montgomery, Telfair and Pulaski, 
ia the State of Georgia ; about three hundred thousand acres ; which 
cost the State in an arrangement with one of the Banks east, in set- 
tling an outstanding debt due us, the sum of Two Hundred and For- 
ty Thousand Dollars. They lie principally upon the waters of the 
Ocmul^ee and Altamaha. 

By virtue of a joint resolution passed on the 16th day of Febru- 
ary, 1849, a contract was made with my immediate predecessor, bv 
which a sale of these lands, without notice, was made to Martin R. 
Green, and a conveyance executed, for the sum of one thousand dollars. 
It is to be regretted that any sale was made of such a lai|^ body of 
lands by the Agent of the State, without reserving the right to the 
Legislature to confirm or reject the same. It is difikolt to deter- 
mine what is the value of these lands; but from information receiv- 
ed the past season, I have reason to believe that a large portion are 
worth firom fifty cents to one dollar per acre. 

Your officers of State, in view of the quantity of land and their 
eost, firom the evidence before us, not necessary to be here mention- 
ed, desiring to preserve them firom passing into the hands of innocent 
purchasers, from Mr. Green, without notice, after mature examina* 
tion, were induced to oflEer the interest of the State in these lands, 
for sab. Due notice has been given, and several pioj^tions have 
been made, some in the way of inquiring as to the title ; others as 
to the valne. No sale can be effected so Ions as the outstanding 
contract and deed remaui as they are. It wouU require more space 
than m alloiled for this communication, to sive the full history of 
this tnnsaction, and the evidence upon whim vour Executive acted 
m oflbring these lands again for sale ; all of which, will, with pleas- 
Bie, be communicated to your body, or to any committee to whom 
the nlqeet may be refiNred. 

It is alike doe to Mr. Green^to all concerned— that yon ahould 
therongUy inv«stiflate this subject You should, upon that investi- 
gitbn, either confirm said safo, and direct the surrendering of all 
2D2 



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112 

the title papers, or you should authorize a suit to be brought to Mt 
aside the conveyance. 1 have no hesitation in recommending the 
bringing of the suit, believing that the State had better receive 
nothmg than to take the one thousand dollars. 
The widow and Executrix of the late Edward J. Black, of Geor- 

fia, has presented a claim for a thousand dollars against the State, 
y virtue of a contract made by your Agent of State and her de- 
ceased husband, relative to these lands, which requires your investi- 
gation. 

On the 13th day of October, 1849, arbitrators appointed by my 
predecessor by virtue of a special act of the Legislature, entitled 
*'An act for the relief of Patrick McGinley," passed February 11, 
1848, made an award in favor of said McGinley, against the State 
of Indiana, for the sum of $21,143 00 ; which said award, together 
with the papers in the cause, as well as the proceedings, were filed 
in the Clerk*s office of the Floyd Circuit Court. On the 13th day of 
November, 1849, two warrants were drawn by the Auditor of State 
upon the Treasurer, — one for the sum of $11,000 dollars; the other 
for $5,000, — both payable on the 1st day of March, 1850; which 
warrants were drawn upon the duly authenticated copy of said 
award, from the Clerk of said court ; the papers on file in said office 
showing that said McGinley agreed to release the sum of $5,143 00, 
that portion of said award over the sum of $16,000,00, upon the 
condition that no appeal was taken in the cause, and which sum of 
$5,143 00 so released, was to be appropriated to the payment of 
costs, expenses, &c. 

On the 5th day of December, 1849, my duties as Executive com- 
menced. The 6th day of February, 1850, being on a visit to the 
State Prison at Jeffisrsonville, I called on the Clerk of the Floyd Gir- 
txxii Court, and requested him to furnish me the papers in the case of 
McGinley. For the first time, I became acquainted with the (act, 
that at the time of the rendition of the award, Mr. BuUett, the at- 
torney for the State, and the only person that was authorized by the 
act aforesaid to appear for the State, had prayed an appeal to the 
Supreme Court in the cause, and that the same was granted. A 
copy of the record in the cause was obtained, and legal gentlemen 
eonsulted, who made an affidavit of the facts of the case, givin|( the 
dates, &c. Upon the application to the Supreme Court, they directs 
ed the cbrk to docket the cause as an appeal. The cause, is. now 
pending in the Supreme Court. The warrants are yet outstanding 
and unpaid. They are unknown to our law, and issued contrary to 
the uniform practice, being payable at a future time, thus giving no- 
tice to all of their character. 

< The coarse adopted in this cause, has been with the concurrent 
action of your officers of State; and I sincerely hope, that if the 
highest judicial tribunal in the State ; the one that decidea the rights 
of our citizens, has not jurisdiction of this cause, so as to decide the 
same upon its merits; that you will adopt such misasares as will give 



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113 

tiittCcwrt amjpfe power. . If the Supreme Court of the Sttte shall 
decide ibMX this claim of McGinley is correct and just, we should 
pay not only the sixteen thousand dollars, but the last dollar, with 
interest, that is adjudged to him. If it should be the pleasure of 
your body to pay th^ outstanding warrants, you Ti^ill remember 
that no payments can be made, unless the tax is levied and the mo- 
ney collected. We have solemnly pledged four-fifths of our State 
revenoe to pay our interest; and the remaining one-fifth is set apart 
to pay the ordinary expenses of the State. This being an extraor* 
dinary demand upon the Treasury, it can be met only by increased 
taxes, or by virtue of a loan. 

From information received from our Senators at Washington, We 
shall not receive any portion .of the thi'ee per .cent, fund due us, 
until some action of Congress is had upon the subject. 

Yoar attention is called to the report of the Quarter Master 
General; particularly, as to the propriety of providing a building 
for the me keeping of. the public arms. 

The report of the Agent of .State, exhibits the wisdom of the. 
act of the Le^ature at its last session, in the great reduction of 
expenditures in that department. The su^estions contained in the 
report are worthy of your consideration. . .... 

A citation has been served upon me in the suit of the Vincennes » 
UuivMsity against the State of Indiana, on a writ of error to the 
Supreme Court of the United States, from the Supreme . Court of 
this State. It devolves upon you to provide in what manner the 
rights of the State shall be represented in this cause. 

In purauance of the discretionary power given to the Auditor of 
Stale and myself, settlements and compromises have been made 
with the lessees upon the Central Canal, by which about $4,400 will, 
be realized ; the repairs and incidental expenses the past year, have . 
been about $1,250. A suit that was brought, is yet pending in the 
Supreme Court. 

Doe notice was siven and a sale efiected. of that portion of the . 
canal lying north of Morgan county. The sale was made to George. 
G. Shoap, John S. Newman and James Rarideu, foi the sum of 
12^425. That portion of the Canal lying in Morgan county was 
sold to Aaron Alldredge for the sum of six hundred dollars. These 
sales are subject to iS confirmed or rejected by you. 1 have no 
doubt that it is to the interest of the State to confirm the sales, and. 
recommend that you take that course. The sooner the State is 
entirely disconnected from all public works, the better. 

The Convention elected by the people to fprm a new Constitution .' 
for the State is still in session, and will probably not close their la- 
bors for some weeks. 



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114 

Tlie approprifttion for the paymmt of the OeoTetttkNi is aliea^y 
exhaiiflted. It will devoWenpon you to make farther approfmafions 
for this object 

As the amount collected by the tax levied the past year will not 
be sofficieut to pay the additional expenses of the Convmiion, I 
su^^est that you anticipate the revenue of the coming year, (the 
same rate of taxation being continued ;) by a loan for this purpose, 
as also for the payment of the July interest on our poUic debt. I 
have no doubt but that the succeeding January interest will be 
promptly met by the people through their collectors. 

It is your duty at this session to apportion the State into Senato- 
rial and Representative districts. Public opinion seems to demand 
a reduction of the number in both houses. As to the character of 
our legtBlation, quite as much may depend upon the capacity of leg- 
islators, as upon their number. Able men will devote themselves to 
the public service for two reasons chiefly; honor and compensation. 
Taking into view the condition of our State, the character of our 
people, and the vast interests which they have at stake in the estab- 
lishment of a ccNTect system of domestic policy, it would seem that 
there is too great a difference between the honors and emoluments of 
the State and National ffovemments. The public business may un- 
doubtedly be disposed of with more system and order, and every in- 
terest of the State may be fairly represented and properly protected, 
by a House of Representatives of seventy-five^ and a Senate of 
thirty members ; provided their election shall be made undor a sys- 
tem liberal enough to secure to the State the services of her best and 
ablest citizens. 

The subject of the colonization of the free blacks is now begin- 
lung to receive that attention which its importance demands. The 
circumstances which surround us, are pressing our people to look 
into this subject in the right light, and in a proper spirit. 

Our southern brethren are making rapid movements towards 
abridging the privileges of this class, even to banishment We in 
the north are adopting extraordinary means for removing them, \}y 
prohibiting them from holding property, excluding them from the 
protection of the laws, and dfenyiug them any rights whatever. 

While all this is going on, our better nature, the common sympa- 
thies of all men, are Beginning to ask these important questions: 
What is to be the end of all this ? Is there no remedy? h there no 
cure for this evil? 

In the midst of all this excitement and confusion, the light breaks 
in upon us, which points conclusively to colonization as the only 
remedy. The infant colony of Liberia, recognized as one among 
the nations of the earth, b^ns now to attract the renewed atten- 
tion of all men, who desire to see an entire separation of the two 
races. In this ereat struggle for the separation of the black man 
from the white, let Indiana take her stand; put her agent into the 
field. Her citizens are ready. Yea, they are willing to contribute 



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115 

«f iMr Mrpltts, aMMtUag for the mmovftl of thb peopfe 
among ub and lo locate them in the native land of their forefathen. 
Other States in this Union have their own aettlementa in Liberia. 
Let Indiaiia have henu Let as fQatahi the movement made by Mr. 
Bryant of Alabama, for the employment of government veswls, lo 
fband an Empire in Africa. Let the National, as wdl as the State 
govenunents, strike at this hour for a permanent and efiectual rem^ 
dy for the agitations and excitement of the day, on this dtfleuh 
qoestion. 

lo poieoanoe of a Joint Resolution of the last session of the Leg- 
islatore, a block of marble, native of the State, was procured and 
forwarded to Washington, to be placed in the mcmument now in 
progreas of erection there, to the memory of the father of his 
country. 

The General Assembly did notaathorize any sentiment to be 
irfaoed on the block. I took the liberty of having inscribed the fol- 
lowing: 

''Indiana knows no North, no South, nothing but the Union.'' 

I did so, because I believed, as I still believe, that the sentiment 
thus engraved on enduring marble, was written also on the hearts 
of our peofrfe, that it was the sentiment of the great mass of my 
fellow-citizens of Indiana, on the most agitating question of the day. 

Complete unanimity is rarely the incident of human councils. In 
a Confederacy like ours, differing as its members do, in soil, climate 
and productions ; in habits, manners and social relations ; in local 
and sectional interests, it could not be expected now, any mora than 
at the birth of our Federal Constitution, that any compromise, based 
upon mutual concasnons, should be satisfactory to all. 

It is not a practical question whether those measures of peace, 
recently framed by ^at and good men, in the same spirit which 
actuated our fathers m days gone by, are, in every respect, such as 
meet our unqualified ap|H-oval. It has been well said, that the lives 
of the best of us are spent in choosing between evils ; and it is often 
a bonnden duty to endure a temporary and incidental evil for a per- 
manent and inherent good. A domestic institution, forced upon our 
foreftitbers in cdonial days, rather than voluntarily adopted by them, 
ii,for the present, the necessaiy policy of our Southern brethren. 
Any sodden abandonment of that policy, is impossible. Even its 
ffiadual relinquishment is beset with difficulty, and embarrassment. 
The patriots of the revolution, convened to frame a government 
that has endured for three quarters of a century, has spread over 
half a hemisphere, the blessings of peace, of political and reli^ous 
fieedom, and of national prosperity ;— assented to the mat princi- 
ple that each State of the Union Is sovereign, as to her internal 
govemnnent, and her social relations. Without this iMoflnition, 
absolute and unconditional, the thirteen original States would never 
have concmred In the federal compact. That was the great eon- 
i^rvative element which bound hearts though it could not reconcile 



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110 . 

ofMotons. Without that:eieiiitDt -the Union woold not have been 
created then. Without it, the Union cannot be preserved now. 

Indiana, acantral State, has always, maintained a high, conserva- 
tive position, especially on that exciting question of the day; which 
has threatened, more seriously than any other, the integrity of pur 
Qonfederacy of States* She is« indeed, convinced, that she has 
wisely selected her own donaestic policy. She. is satisfied with the 
d^pree of prosperity, which under that free policy, she has attained.. 
Our State was the nineteenth admitted into the Union. In wealth 
in agricaltural and commercial importance she is now the fifth, if 
indeMl^e be not the fourth. Of the eighteen States which com-, 
poeed the Union when we were admitted, four, at most, are now in 
aur advance : and not one of those since admitted has come within 
sight of us. Maintaining her position ahead of all her younger sisters, 
Indiana has walked quietly in advance of fourteen of the older 
States. In our onward progress we have uniformly acted toward- 
each, equal to equal. Our compacts with the Great confederacy to 
which we belong and every member of it, have been faithfully kept 
in letter and in spirit* Neither by legislative act nor otherwise have 
we withheld from any citizen of the Union the rights which, under 
the federal compact, are assured to him. To this day no cause of 
complaint has beeen given; nor, so far as I. know, has complaint been 
made, against Indiana, by any State in the Union. 

Above all, Indiana recognizes the imperative duty, by every good 
dtizen, of obedience to the laws of the land. 

Whatever difference of opinion may exist as to the late compro- 
mise measures enacted by Congress, however ultra men in the North 
or in the South <nay oppose or denounce them, there is but .one 
course of action for the true patriot to pursue; and that is, unhesi- 
tatingly and in good faith to carry out their enactments. 

There is no safety for property, for liberty, nor for life, except in the : 
absolute supremacy of the law. There is no higher duty of the citizen 
than to maintain, by word and deed, that supremacy. As we value the 
heritage, rich beyond all price, purchased not with silver .or gold,: 
but with the life's blood of the good and braye — that heritage be- 
queathed to us by our fathers, and which we, in turn, must bequeath 
inviolate to our descendants — let us bear in mind, this great truth . 
that the first public act of disobedience to law, is the first fatal step 
on the downward road to anarchy. 

The Constitution of this great Confederacy, written on parchment, 
may be rent asunder, if it be not written also on the hearts and 
affections of the people. It is written on ours. We love, we re- . 
spect it, we give it our highest sanction, alike for the sake, of the 
sacred principles, guardian of human liberty, embodied in its provis- 
ions, for the unnumbered blessings we. have enjoyed under its rule; 
and in memory also of that band of great and good men, who con- : 
ceived and established it. Tbis truth should be undeiistopd by our 
' people, that this Union cannot be preserved by force. If it could, 



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•15^ /!' 

it would not be worth preserving. The bonds and ligaments that 
bind as togefher, are moral and not physical. Our glorious Union 
is one of consent and not of force. It is a Union of confidence, of 
trust, of love, and of affection. When these are gone, the Union 
loses all its attraction and value. 

At no hour of our history have we required, more than at the 
present, an infusion into our councils of that spirit in which the 
articles of our confederacy were first conceived. As Representa- 
tives, as citizens of Indiana, as citizens of the United States, we have 
difficult, delicate, important duties to perform. Foremost amoiu( 
these is the obligation to oppose, by every lawful means, that spirit 
of factious fanaticism alike suicidal wherever it has birth, .which 
insidiously assunpes the garb, in one section, of philanthropy, in 
another, of State rights* By speech, by action, by concession, by 
forbearance, by compromise, by the influence of moral suasion and 
the.strong power of kindness, by each and all of these meansi lei us 
seek to allay the spirit of lawless misrule, that spirit which instab 
each man's opinion the arbiter of constitutional rights, or which 
coolly estimates the value of this Union, and looks with steady eya 
on a separation of these States, the certain herald of bloodshed 
and a thousand horrors, a separation to be surely and speedily fol- 
lowed by war, in its most odious form, servile, perhaps, as well as 
civil, — war among those of the same race, the same name, the same 
blood, — ^war that shall brin^ together in hostile array, neighbor 
against neighbor, brother agamst brother, son against sire. _ 

To avert calamities so direful, Indiana will cast, even to the lastt 
the entire weight of her influence. She will be just to each and 
every member of the confederacy— just to the Constitution— just to 
the laws. She will abide by that Constitution — abide by the laws; 
and above all, she will abide by the comprombes made by our 
fathers — the compromises made by the great and ^ood men of tlus 
day. She will hope, she will pray, that the same kind and overruling 
Providence which watched over our Fathers at the adoption of the 
Constitution, and has sustained in every crisis and cheered in every 
hour of darkness since, will direct their sons also in the paths of 
wisdom and of peace, and enable us to transmit to posterity that 
sacred instrument, a guide and a blessing in the Future, as it has ever 
beeoi in the Past. 

Indiana takes her stand in the ranks, not of Southern destiny^ nor 
yet of NoRTHXRii dbbtiht. She plants herself on the basis of the 
Constitution ; and takes her stand in the ranks of American DBsmnr. 

JOSEPH A. WRIGHT. 

December 31, 1850. 



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\ii 



TABULAR £STIMAT&-^EB PAGE 6. 



Ymr. 




JautaUfMtm 


Ammuu^ rimiift 




iaeriMMS^vemt 


rindMl 


KpHfafaiL 


1853 


500,000 00 


100,000 00 


100,000 00 


1854 


515,000 00 


120,000 00 


230,000 00 


1855 


530.450 00 


141.450 00 


361,450 00 


1856 


546,363 50 


164,436 00 


525386 00 


1857 


562,754 40 


189,048 70 


714,934 70 


1858 


579,637 03 


215,383 76 


930318 4S 


1859 


597,026 14 


243,542 06 


1.173360 52 


18«0 


614,936 92 


273,629 94 


1,447,490 46 


1861 


633,385 02 


305,759 54 


1,753,250 00 


1862 


652,386 57 


340,049 07 


2,093,299 07 


1863 


671,958 16 


376,623 11 


2,469,922 18 


1864 


692,116 90 


415,613 00 


2385335 18 


1865 


712,880 40 


457,157 15 


3342,692 33 


1866 


734,266 81 


501,401 42 


3344.093 75 


1867 


756,294 81 


548,499 49 


4392393 24 


1868 


778,983 65 


598,613 31 


4,991,206 55 


1869 


802353 15 


651,903 47 


5,643,110 03 


1870 


856,423 74 


708,579 24 


6351,689 26 


1871 


851,216 45 


768300 61 


7,120,490 17 



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Ot^ff'f 



WASHINGTON'S 

FAREWELL ADDRESS. 

TOTHK 

PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES. 

SEPTEMBER 17, 1796. 

(APPKHDKD TO THK GOVERNOR'S MES8AGB, ACCORDIRO TO A LAW OF l8iB.) 



Faimsim aicd Fbllow Citizens: 

The period for a new election of a citizen to administer the exec^ 
utive government of the United States, being not far distant, and 
the time actually arrived \vhen your thoughts must be employed in 
designating the person who is to be clothed with that important trust; 
it appears to me proper, e.<pecially as it may conduce to a more dis- 
tiact expression of the public voice, that I should now apprize you 
of the resolution I have formed, to decline being considered among 
the Dumber of those out of whom a choice is to be made. 

I beg you, at the same time, to do me the justice to be assured^ 
that thb resolution has not been taken without a strict regard to all 
the considerations appertaining to the relation which binds a dutiful 
citizen to his country ; and that, in withdrawing the tender of ser- 
vice, which silence in my situation might imply, I am influenced by 
tui diminution of zeal for your future interest — no deficiency of grate- 
ful respect for your past kindness ; but am supported by a full con* 
Tiction. that the step is compatible with^'both. 

The acceptance of, and a continuance hitherto in, the oflice to 
which your suflTrages have twice called me, have been a uniform' 
sacrifice of inclination to the opinion of duty, and to a deference to 
what appeared to be your desire. 1 constantly hoped that it wootii 
2D14 



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130 

have been much earlier in my power, consistently with motives which 
I was not at liberty to disregard, to return to that retirement from 
which 1 have been reluctantly drawn. The strength of my inclina* 
tion to do this, previous to the last election, had even led to the pre- 
paration of an address to declare it to you; but mature reflection on 
the then perplexed and critical posture of our aflaira with foreign na- 
tions, and the unanimous ad vice of persons entitled to my confidence, 
impelled me to abandon the idea. 

1 rejoice that the state of your concerns, external as well as inter- 
nal, no longer renders the pursuit of inclination incompatible with 
the sentiment of duty or propriety; and am. persuaded, whatever 
partiality may be retained for my services, that in the present cir- 
cumstances of our country, you will not disapprove my determina- 
tion to retire. 

Thf impressions with which 1 first undertook the arduous trusty 
Were explained on the proper occasion. In the discharge of this 
trust, I will only say, that 1 have, with good intention, contributed 
towards the organization and administration of the government, the 
best exertions of which a very fallible judgment was capable. Not 
unconscious, in the outset, of the inferiority of my qualifications, 
experience in my own eyes, perhaps still more in the eyes of others, 
has strengthened the motives to diffidence to myself; and every day 
the increasing weight of years admonishes me more and more that 
the shade of retirement is as necessar> for me, as it will be welcome. 
Satisfied that if any circumstances have given peculiar value to my 
services, they were temporary, I have the consolation to believe, that 
while choice and prudence invite me to quit the political scene, patri- 
otism does not forbid it. 

In lookin^r forward to the moment which is intended to terminate 
the career ot my pub'ic life, my feelings do not permit me to suspend 
tlu^ deep acknowledgment of that debt of gratitude which I owe to 
my beloved country, for the many honora it has conferred upon me ; 
still more for the steadfast confidence with which it has supported 
me; and for the opportunities I have thence enjoyed, of manifesting 
my inviolable attachment, by services faithful and persevering, 
though in usefulness unequal to my zeal. If benefits have resulted to 
oui: country from these services, let it always be remembered to your 
praise, and as an instructive example in our annals, that under cir«- 
ciimstances in wh'ch the passions, agitated in every direction, were 
liable to mislead, amidst appearances sometimes ' dubious, viciasl'^ 
tudes of fortune often discouraging, in 8ittuiti<Hks in which, not uo^ 
frequently, want of success has countenanced the spirit of criticism, 
the constancy of your support was the essential prop of the eflTorti, 
and a guaranty of the plans by which they were efiected. Profound* 
]y. penetrated with this idea, I shall carry it with me to my grave, as 
a strong excitement to unceasing vows, that Heaven may continue 
to. you the choicest tokens of its beneiicenre ; that yotir union. and 
brotherly affection may be perpetual ; that the free constitutiM, 



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which ii the work of your haiulv, may be sacredly malDtaroed ; that 
its adiiiinistnitioii, in every department, ihay be stamped with wis- 
dom aad tirtue ; that, in fine, the happiness of the people of these 
States^ ander the auspices oflibertv, may be made complete by so 
eareful a preservation, and so prudent ause of this blessing, as witl' 
acquire to them the glory of recommending it to the applause, ttie' 
affectioD, and the adoption of eiery nation which is yet a stranger 
\6lt. 

Here, perhaps, 1 ought to stop ; but a soiicitode for your welfare, 
which cannot end but with my life, and the apprehension of danger 
natural to that solicitude, urge me, on an occasion like the present* 
to offer to your solemn contemplation, and to recommend to your 
frequent review, some sentiments, which are the result of much re-* 
flection, of noinconsiderabie observation, and which appear to me all 
important to the permanency of your felicity as a people. These 
will be offered to you with the more freedom, as you can only see ia 
them the disinterested warnings of a parting friend, who can possibly 
have no personal motive to bias his counsel ; nor can I forget, as an 
encoam^ement to it, your indulgent reception of my sentiments on a' 
former and not dissimilar occasion. 

Interwoven as is the love of liberty with every ligament of your^ 
heart, no recommendation of mine is necessary to fortify or confirm' 
the attachment. 

The unity of government, which constitutes you one people, is 
rftto now dear to you. It is justly so; for it is a'main pillar in the' 
edifice of your real independence ; the support of your tranquility at 
home, your peace abroad ; ol your safety ; of your proi^perity ; of 
that very liberty which you so highly prize. But as it is easy to 
foresee, that from different causes and from different quarters, much 
pains will betaken, many artifices employed, to weaken, in your' 
minds, the conviction of this truth ; as this is the point in your polit- 
ical fortress against which the batteries of internal and etternal ene- 
mies will be most constantly and actively (though often covertly and' 
insidiously) directed* it is of infinite moment that you should properly 
estimate the immense value of your national union to your collective 
and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, 
and immoveable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think 
and spedk of it as of the palladium of your political safety and pros-* 
perity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discouo- 
tenandng whatever may surest even a suspicion that it can, in any 
event, be abandoned ; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawn-' 
ing of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from 
the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the 
varieuBi parts. 

For thb you have every inducement of sympathy and interest 
Citizens, by birth, or choice, of a common country, that country has 
a right to concentrate your affections. The nnnie o( American ^ which' 
taiUa|(t to you in your national capacity, most aiwap exalt the just* 



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m 

pride of patriotum* more than any appellation derived froip local 
discriminations. With slight shades of diflTerence, you have the 
same religion, manners, habits, and political principles. You have, 
in a CO. union cause, fought and, triumphed together; the independ* 
^M^e and liberty you possess are the work of joint counciU and joint 
e0Qrts, of common dangers, sufferings and successes. 

But these considerations, however powerfully they address them* 
selves to your sensibility, are greatly outweighed by those v^hich ap* 
ply more. immediately to your interest ; here every portion of our 
country finds the most commanding motives for carefully guarding 
and preserving the union of the whole. 

The North, in an unrestrained intercourse with the South, protect^ 
ed by the equal laws of a Common government, finds in the prpduc* 
tions of the latter, great additional resources of maritime and com* 
ipercial enterprise, and precious materials of manufacturing industry. 
The South, in the same intercourse, benefitting by the agency of the 
North, sees its agriculture grow, and its commerce expand. Turn«> 
if(g partly into its own channels the seamen of the North, it fin/tln its 
particular navigation invigorated : and while it contributes, in differ* 
ent ways, to nourish and increase the general mass of the national 
naviffaiion, it looks forward, to the protection of a maritime, strength, 
to which itself is equally adapted. The East, in like intercourse with 
tne West, already finds, and in the progressive improvement of inte- 
rior communications by land and water, will more and more find a 
valuab'e vent for the commodities which it brings from abroad, .or 
maniifactures at home. The West derives from the East supplies 
requisite to its growth and comfort ; and what is pei ha|is ot still 
greater consequence, it must, of necessity, owe the secure enjoyment 
oJT indispensable outlets for itsown productions, to the weight, iuflu* 
ence, andthe future maritime strength of the Atlantic side of the 
(fnioo, directed by an indissoluble community of interest as one na* 
tion. Any other tenure by which the West can hold this essential 
]|dvantage, whether derived from its own separate strength, or from 
an apostate and unnatural connexion with any foreign power, must 
he intrinsically precarious 

' While, then, every p^n of our country thus feels an immediate 
and particular interest m union, all the parts combined cannot fail to 
find, in the united mass of means and efforts, greater strength, great* 
er resource^ proportionably greater security from external danger, a 
less frequent interruption of their peace by foreign nations: and what 
is of inestimable valued they must derive from union, an exemption 
from those broils and wai*s between themselves, which so frequently 
afflict neighboring countries, not tied together by the ^me .govern* 
ment, which their own rivalships alone would be sufficient to pro* 
duQe, but which opposite foreign alliances, attachments, and intrigues, 
would stimulate and embitter. Hence, likewise! they will avoid the 
i^ecessity of those overgrown military establishn>ents, wh|ch, under 
any form of government, are inauspicious to liberty, and which are 



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to be regarded as particularly hostile to republican liberty ; in thn 
tense it is* that your union ought to be considered as a mnin prop of 
your liberty, and that the love oftheone ought to endear to you the 
preservation cvf the other. 

These considemtions spealc a persuasive language to every reflect- 
ing and virtuous mind, and exhibit the continuance of that union as 
a primary opject of patriotic desire. Is there a doubt whether a 
common government can embrace so large a sphere T Let experience 
•olve'ic. To listen to mere speculotion in such a case, were criminal 
We are authorized to hope, that a proper orsar.ization of the whole, 
with the auxiliary aeency of governments lor the respective subdi- 
visions, will afford a happy issue to the experiment. It is welt wortb 
a fair and full experiment. With such powerful and obvious motives 
to union, affecting all parts of our country, while experience shall 
not have demonstrated its impracticability, there will alwas be rea- 
son to distrust the patriotism of those, who, in any quarter, may en- 
deavor to weaken its bands. 

In contemplating the causes which may disturb our union, it occurs 
asmatter of serious concern, that any ground sliould have been fur- 
nished for characterizing parties by geographical discriminations; — 
Northern and Southern — Atlantic and Western ; ^\ hence designing 
men may endeavor to excite the belief that there is a real difierence 
of local interests and views. Orle of the expedients of parly to ac- 
quire in6ueQce within particular districts is, to misrepresent the opin-^ 
ions and aims of other districts. You cannot shield yourselves too 
much against the jealousies and heat*t- burnings which spring from 
these misrepresentations; they tend to render alien to each otheir 
those who ought to be bound together by fraternal affection. The 
inhabitants of our western country have lately had a useful lesson on 
this head ; they have seen in the n^otiation by the executive, and 
by the unanimous ratification by the ^nate,of ihe treaty with Spain, 
and in the universal sati<yfaction at that event throughout the United 
Slates, a dedsive proof how unfounded were the suspicions propagat- 
ed among them, of a policy in the general government, and in the 
AtlaUtic States, unfriendly to their interests, in regard to the Missis- 
sippi: they have been witnesses to the formation of two treaties; 
that with Great Britain, and that with Spain, which secure to theni 
every thing they coulJ desire in respect to our foreign relations, to* 
wards confirming their prosperity. Will it not be their wisdom to 
rely for the preservation of these advantages, on the union bv whic- 
they were pi*ocured t Will they not henceforth be deaf to those ad 
risers, if auch there are, who would sever theni from their brethren 
and connect them with aliens? 

To* the efficacy and permanency of your union, a government for 
the whole is indispensable. No alliances, howeyel* strict, between 
the parts, can be an adequate substitute; they must inevitably expe* 
rience the infractions and intei'ruptions which all alliances, in all 
liniei, have ekperienced. Sensible of thb mom^ntoiis truth, you have 



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1^ 

improved upon your first essay, by the adoption of a constitulipn of 
government better calculated than your formeri for an intimate un* 
.ion, and for the efficacious management of your common coqcerns. 
This government, the offspring of your own choice, uninfluenced and 
unawed, adopted upon full investigation and mature deliberation, 
completely free in its principles, in the distribution of its poiprers, 
juniting secujity with energy, and containing within itself a provision 
for its own amendment, has a just claim to your confidence and your 
support. Respect for its authority, compliance with its laws, acqtii* 
escence in its measures, are duties enjoined by the fundamental max- 
ims of true liberty. The basis of our political systems is th^ right 
f the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government: 
»ut, the coistitution which at any time exists, till changed by an ex- 
plicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory 
upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people te 
establish government, pre-supposes the duty of every individual to 
obey the established government. 

All obstructions to the execution of the laws, all combinations find 
associations, under whatever plausibly character, with the real de- 
sign to direct, control, counteract, or awe the regular deliberation 
and action of the constituted authorities, are destructive of this fun- 
damental principle, and of fatal tendency. They serve to organize 
faction, to give it an artificial and extraordinary force, to put in the 
place of the delegated will of the nation, the will of a party, often 
js small but artful and enterprising minority of the community s and, 
according to the alternate triumphs of different parties, to make the 
public administration the mirror of the ill-concerted and incongruous 
projects ol' faction, rather than the organ of consistent and whole- 
IK^me plans, digested by common councils and modified by mutual 
interests. 

tiowever combinations or associations of the above description 
may now and then answer popular ends, they are likelv, ^n tb9 
course of time and things, to become potent engines, by wMch cun- 
ning, ambitious, and unprincipled men, will be enabled to subvert 
the |Kiwer of tbe people, and to usurp for themselves the reins g( 
government, destroying, afterwards^ tbe very engines which hav^ 
ufted them to unjust dominion. 

Towards the preservation of your government, i^nd the permanent 
fy of vour present happy st^te, it is requisite, not onlv that voj^ 
steadily discountenance irregular opposition to its acknf>wle4ge4 
authority, but also that you resist with care, the spirit of inuovatmi 
upon its principles, however specious the pretexts. One method of 
assault may be, to effect, in the forms of th^ con^titutiou, alteratiom 
which will impair the energy of the system, and thus to undern)ine 
what cannot be directly overthrown. In all tbe changes to whicb 
you may be invited, remember, that time and habit are t|t least 9f 
necessary to fix the true character of governments, as of other hu* 
man institutions ; that experience is the surest standard by which t^ 



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tal the real tend^noy of tfte exbtiilg constitution of a country; tiuK 
frotfity m chaogtts, upon the credit of mere hypothesis and opinioOt 
exposes to pwpetoai changOy from the endless variety of bypoihesii 
and opinion : and remember especially, that forthe eflicielit*manag»* 
meat of your common interests, in a country so extensive as ours^ h 
govermnent of as much vigor as is consistent with the perfect security 
of liberty, is indispensable. Liberty itself will find in such a govern^ 
ttwot, with powers properly distributed and adjusted, its surest guat*- 
dian. It is, indeed, littteet^e than a name, where the government ik 
too feeble to withstand the enterprises of faction, to confine each 
memberof the society within the limits prescribed by the laws, and to 
vaintaiii all in the secure and tranquil enjoyment of the rights of 
person and property. 

1 have already intimated to you the danger of parties in the state, 
with particular reference to the founding of them on geographical 
discriminations. Let me now taken more comprehensive view, and 
warn you, in the most solemn manner, against the baneful effects of 
the spirit of party generally. 

Tbi$ apirit, unfortunately, is inseparable from our nature, having 
Its root in the strongest passions of the human mind. It exists, under 
4tfferant shapes, in aH governments, more or less stifled, controlled, 
or repressed ; but in those of the popular form, it is seen in its great** 
eat rankness, and is traly their worst enemy. 

The alternate dominion of one faction over another, sharpened by 
llw spirit of revenge natural to party dissension* which, in different 
ages and countries, has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is it* 
self a frigh'iul despotism. The disorder and miseries which result^ 
graifaiaiiy incline the minds of men to seek security and repose in the 
Absolote power of an individual, and^ sooner or later, the chief <rf 
some prevailing faction, more able or more fortunate than his com^ 
petilors, toms this disposition to the purpose of his own elevation on 
the ruins of public liberty. 

Without lodiing forward to an extremity of this kind, (which, 
iMrertheless, ought not to be entirely out of sight,) the common and 
continoal mischiefs of the spirit of party, are sufllicient to moke il 
Ae interest and the duty of a wise people to discourage and re- 
Btrain it. 

It serves always to distract the Public Councils, and enfeeble the 
Public Administration. - It agitates the community with ill-founded 
jaaloosies and false alarm; kindles the animosity of one part against 
another, foments occostoaally riot and insurrection. It opens the 
docM* to foreign influence and corruption, which find a faci.itated me^ 
oeaa to the govemtnent itself, through the channels of party passions: 
Thus the policy and the will of one country are subjected to the pol- 
icy and will of another. 

There is an opinion, tbat parties in free countries are useful checks 
opon the administration of the government, and serve io keep alive 
Ibm apirit of Liberty* This^ within certaia limits, is probably true; 



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ISB 

mxd in governmdntH of a Monarchical cast, PatriosMm may look with 
iodulgonce* if not with favor, upon the spirit of party. But in thon 
of the popular character, in Governments purely elective, it is a 
spirit not to be encouraged. From their natural tendency, it is cer- 
tain there will always be enough of that spirit for every salutary 
purpose. And, there being constant danger of excess, the effort 
ouffhttobe, by force of public opinion, to mitigate and assuage it 
A nre not to be quenched, it demands a uniform vigilance to prevent 
its bursting into a flame, lest, instead of warming, it should consume. 

It is important, likewise, that the habits of thinking in a free 
country should inspire caution, in those entrusted with its adminia- 
tratidn, to confine themselves within their respective constitutional 
spheres, avoiding, in the exercise of the powers of one department to 
encroach upon another. The spirit of encroachment tends to con- 
solidate the powers of all the departments into one, and thus to cre- 
ate, whatever the form of government, a real despotism. A just es- 
timate of that love of power, and proneness to abuse it, which pre- 
dominates in the human heart, is sufficient to satisfy ua of the trutk 
of this position. The necessity of reciprocal checks in the exercise of 
political power, by dividing and distributing it into diflferent deposi- 
tories, and constituting each the guardian of the public weal against 
invasions by the others, has been evinced by experiments, ancient 
and modern ; some of them in our country, and under our own eyes. 
To preserve them, must be as necessary as to institute them. If, in 
the opinion of the people, the distribution or modification of the con- 
stitutional powers be in any particular wrong, let it be corrected by 
an amendment in the way which the Constitution designates. But 
let there be no change by usurpation ; for though this in one instance, 
may be the instrument of good, it is the customary weapon by whicli 
free governments are destroyed. The precedent must always greatly 
overbalance in permanent evil, any partial or transient benefit, 
which the use can at any time yield. 

Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperi- 
tv, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain wotiM 
that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subi* 
vert these great pillars of human happiness — these firmest props ot 
the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with 
the pious man, ought to respect and cherish them. A volume could 
not trace all their connexions with private and public felicity. Let 
it simply' be asked, where is the security for property, for reputation^ 
for life, if the sense of religious obligation deaeri the oaths, which are 
the instruments of investigation in courts of justice? And let us 
with caution indulge the supposition, that morality can be maintain- 
ed without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of 
refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experi* 
mce both, forbids us to expect that national morality can prevail in 
•Kclusion of religious principle. 

It is substantially true* that virtue or morality is a necessary 



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spriog or popular government The rule indeed extends with more 
or loss force* to every species of free government. Who that is a 
sincere friend to it. can look with indifference upon attempts to shake 
the foundation of the iabric t 

Promote, then, as an object of primary infportance, institutions 
for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the struc- 
ture of a government gives force to public opinion. It is essential that 
public opinion should be enlightened. 

As a very important source of strength and security, cherish pub- 
lic credit. One method of preserving it, is to use it as sparingly as 
possible; avoiding occasions of expense, by cultivating peace, but 
also remembering that timely disbursements to prepare for danger, 
frequently prevent much greater disbursements to repel it; avoiding, 
likewise, the accumulation of debt, not only by shunning occasions 
of expense, but by vigorous exertions in time of peace, to discharge 
the debts which unavoidable wars may have occasioned, not ungener- 
ously throwing upon posterity the burthen which we ou)*selves ought 
to bear. The execution of these maxims belongs to your represent 
tatives, but it is necessary that public opinion should co-operate. To 
iacilitate to them the performance of tneir duty, it is essential that 
you should practically bear in mind, that, towards the payment of 
debts, there must be revenue; that to have revenue there must be 
taxes; that no taxes can be devised which are not more or less in- 
convenient and unpleasant ; that the intrinsic embarrassment, insep- 
arable from the selection of the proper objects, (which is also a choice 
of difficulties,) ought to be a decisive motive for a candid construction 
of the conduct of the Government in making it, and for a spirit of 
•cqaiescense in the measures for obtaining the revenue, which' the 
public exigencies may at any time dictate. 

Observe good faith and justice towards all nations ; cultivate 
peace and harmony with ail. Religion and morality enjoin thi^ 
conduct ; and can it be that good policy does not equally enjt>in it 1 
It will be worthy of a free, enlightened, and, at no distant period, a 
great nation, to give to mankind the magnanimous, and too novel 
example, of a people always guided by an exalted justice and benev<> 
olepce. Who can doubt that, in the course of time and things, the 
froitrof suob a plan would richly repay any temporary advantages 
which might be lost by a steady adherence to it T Can it be, that 
Providence has not connected the permanent felicity of a nation 
with its virtue ? The experiment, at least, is recommended by every 
•entimeot which enobles human nature. Alas I it is rendered im-^ 
possible by its vicee I 

In the execution of such a plan, nothing is more essential than 
that permanent inveterate antipathies against particular nations, and 
pessionate attachments for others, should be excluded ; and that in 
place of them, just and amiable feelings towards aH should be culti- 
^ted. 'Th»4?ation which indulges towards another an habitual ha- 
tnd, or an halutual fondness, if, in some degree, a slave. It u a 



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fhfe to its aaimoshy «r to ItB affiKstioDt mA^rot ithkh is wfficmK 
toiead itastmy from its duty Md its iftt^vest. Antipathy in one 
imtioD against another, disposes each more readily to offer insult and 
injury, to lay hold of slight causes of umbrage, and lo be haughty 
4nd intractable, when accidental or trifling occasions of dispute oc- 
cur. Hence frequent coUbioas; obstinate* envenomed, and bloody 
contests. The nation, prompted by ill-will and resentment, boom* 
times impels to war thegoverni|ient,contrary to the best caloulatkMM 
of policy. The government sometimes participates in the natiimal 
propensity, and adopts* through passion, what reason would rqeot; 
at other times, it makes the animosity of the nation subservient to 
the projects of hostility, instigated by pride, ambition and otber sio^ 
isler and pernicious motives. The peace often, sometimes, pevfas^iap 
the liberty of nations has been the victim. 

So, likewise, a passionate attachment of one nation for another^ 
produces a variety of evils. Sympathy for the favorite nation, lacili- 
tating the illusion of an imaginary common interest, in cases where 
no real common interest exists, and infusing into one the ennHties ef 
the other, betrays the former into a participation in the quarrela and 
vers of the latter, without adequate inducement or justification. It 
kadsalso to concessions to the favorite nation, of privileges deoied to 
otlwrs, which is apt doubly to injure the nation making the ooncess- 
ion ; by unnecessarily parting with what ou^t to have been retain^ 
ed, and by exciting jealousy, ill-will, and a disposition to retaliaie« ia 
(he parties from whom equal privileges are withheld; and giifta to 
ambitious, corrupted, or deluded citizens (who devote themselves to 
the favorite nation) facility to betray or sacrifice the interests of their 
own country, without pdium, sometimeseven with popularity ; fpi^ 
ing with the appearances of a virtuous sense of obl^ation, a com- 
asendable deference for public opinion, or a laudable seal for public 
flood, the base or foolish compliance of ambition, corruption, or iii# 
twiation* 

As avenues to foreign influence in ionujaerable wars, such attache- 
naents are particularly alarming to the truly enlightened and inde* 
pendent patriot. How many opportunities^ do thev afford to tampee 
with domestic factions, to practice the arts of seduction, to mislead 
public opinion, to influence or awe the public Ck>uacil t Such an nU 
tacbment of a small or weak, towards a great and powerful nation* 
dooms the former to be a satelite of the latter. 

Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence, ( I conjure 3^011 ie 
believe moi fellow citizens,) th^ jealousy of a free people oi%{ht to be 
constantly awake : since history and experience prove, that kxtmga 
influence is one of the most baneful foes of Republican Govemmont 
But that jealousy, to be uaefuU must be impartial ; else it becomes tbs 
instrument of the very influence to be avoided, instead of a dafiuiee 
against it. Excsssive partiality for one fore^ natioii» and excessf 
iw dislike of another, caose those whom thejr aotuateio see <^n0*' 
^y on one ttde, and serve to veil, and evenasqaid the arte of in&H 



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«Bfio CHI the otiier. B^ |Wtriirti» who m^y nri$t th9 iMngoos of tilt 
ftvorite, ere liable to bfloomcisusfwctcidaod odious, ^vhife itstoobnod 
d«pes uraq> tbo tpplai]90 and confid^nc^ of the poopiLe, to surrandi^r 
their interatlt. 

The great rule of conduct for us, in i^gard to foreign nations, iip 
m extending our commercial relatJ0Ds» to have with ihaoi as little 
poIUical connexion as possible. So far as ^e have alrei^dy formed 
engagemento, let them he fulfilled with perfect good faith. Here lei 
tts stop. 

Europe has a set of primary interests, svhioh to us have nonet or 
a Tery remote relation. Hence she musft be engaged in frequeol 
controvem^f the causes of which a,re essentially foreign to our con* 
cems. Hence, therefore, it must he unwise in us to implicate our- 
selves by artifidal ties, in the ordinary vicissitudes of tier politics, or 
the oidinary combinations and collisions of her friendships or 
qnmitias. 

Our detached and distant situation invites and enables us to pursMf 
a different course. If we remain one people, under an efficient gov*- 
emmeat, the period is not far off, whep we ipay defy nuitf rial injury 
from cq^temal annoyance : when we may take such an attitue m 
vill c«use the neutrality we may at any time resolve upon, to he 
scrupulously respected ; when belligerent nations, under the impossir 
biJity of making acquisitions upon us, will npt lightly hazard the giv*- 
ing us provocation ; when we may choose peace or war, as our in- 
terest, giuded by justice, shall counsel. 

Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation ? Why quit 
oer own, to stand upon foreign ground ? Why, by interweaving oar 
destiny i;fith that of any part of Europe, entangle our peace and 
prosperity in the toils of Eujropean ambitioa, nvalsbip, interest, hi;i* 
Nior,or caprice 7 

It isour true policy to steer clear of pe]:mawnt ailjences with any 
^rtioa of the foreign world ; so far, I i;nea.n, as we are now at liber* 
ij to do it; for let ipe not he understood as capable of patroniffinjg 
iafi(ielity to existing engfigements. I hold the maxim no less apfJi* 
cable to public, than to private affairs, that honesty is always the 
Wit policy. I repeat it, therefore, let those engagements be observed 
i% tbeir genuine sense. But, in my opinioq, it ip uunpcewary aii4 
HQold be unwise to ei&ejMl them. 

Taking care always to keep ourselveat by suitable esteblishmentsb 
ie a reipeotable defonaive posture, we may safely Irusi to temponiry 
illiaoces for extraordinary emergencies. 

Harmony, lihsral intercourse with all nations, are recommended 
kf policy, humanity, and interest. But even our commercial policy 
ikould bold an eqnal and impartial hand ; neither seeking nor grant- 
ia|[ exclusive fiivors or preferences; oonsulUng the natural course, of 
thiogs ; diflusinff and diversifying, by ^ntle means, the streams oC 
nNnmer<:e« but forcing nothing; estAbbshingi with powers sp dispo- 
^, in order to gire tradp a stable course, to define the rights of our 



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merchants, and to enable the government to support them, conven- 
tional rules or iitercour^ie, the be^it that present ciscumstancei and 
mutual opinion willpermit, but temporary, and liable to be from 
time to timp abandoned or varied, as experience and circumstances 
•hall dictate ; constantly keeping in view, that it is folly in one na- 
tion to look for disinterested favors from another; that it must pay 
with a portion of its independence, for whatever it may accept under 
that character; that, by such acceptance, it may place itself in the 
condition of having given equivalents for nominal favors, and yet of 
being reproached with ingratitude for not giving more. There can 
be no greater error than to expect or calculate upon real favors from 
nation to nation. It is an illusion, which experience must cura» 
which a just pride ought to dbcard. 

In oflfering to you, my countrymen, these counsels, of an old and 
affectionate friend, I dare not hope they will make the strong and 
lasting impression I could wish; that they will control the usual 
current of the passions, or prevent our nation from running the 
course, which has hitherto marked the destiny of nations. But, if 1 
may even flatter myself, that they may be productive of some partial 
benefit, some occasional good; tiiat they may now and then recur 
to moderate the fury of party spirit, to warn against the mischieb 
of foreign intrigue, to guard against the impostures of pretended 
patriotism; this hope will be a full recompense for the solicitude for 
your welfare, by which they have been dictated. 

How far, in tne discharge of my official duties, I have been guided 
by the principles which have been delineated, the public records and 
other evidences of my conduct must witness to you and to the world. 
To myself, the assurance of my own conscience is, that 1 have at 
least believed myself to be guided by them. 

. In relation to the still subsisting war in Europe, my Proclamatioii 
of the 22d of April, 1793, is the index to my plan. Sanctioned 
by your approving voice, and by that of your Representatives in 
both Houses in Congress, the spirit of that measure has continually 
governed me, uninfluenced by any attempts to deter or divert me 
from it. 

After deliberate examination, with the aid of the best lights I 
could obtain, 1 was well satisfied that our country, under all the cir- 
cumstances of the case, had a right to take, and was bound in duty 
and in interest, to take a neutral position. Having taken it, I deter- 
mined, as far as should depend upon me, to maintain it, with mode- 
ration, perseverence, and firmness. 

The considerations, which respect the right to hold this conduct* 
it is not necessary on this occasion, to detail. I will only observe* 
that, according to my understanding of the matter, that right, so far 
from being denied by any of the belligerent Powers, has been virtu- 
ally admitted bv all. 

The duty of holding a neutral conduct, may be inferred, withont 
anything more, from the obligation which justice and humanity im- 



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131 

pm on erery nation, in cases in which it is free to act, to maintain 
iBTioiate, the relations of peace and amity towards other nations. 

The inducements of interest for obsierving that conduct, will best 
be re erred to your own reflections and experience. With me, a 
predominant motive has been, to endeavor to gain time to our coun- 
try to settle and mature its yet recent institutions, and to progress 
without interruption, to that degree of strength and consistency, 
which uf necessary to give it, humanly speaking, the command of its 
own fortunes. 

Thou^, in reviewing the incidents of my adminbtration, I am 
QDConscious of intentional error, I am nevertheless too sensible of 
my defects, not to think it probable that I may have committed many 
errors. Whatever they may be, I fervently beseech the Almighty 
to avert or mitigate the evils to which they may tend. I shall also 
earry with me the hope, that my country will never cease to view 
thein with indulgence, and that, after Ibrty-flve years of my life ded- 
icated to iui service, with an upright zeal, the faults of incompetent 
tbilities will be consigned to oblivion, as myself must soon be, to the 
manHionii of rest. 

Relying on its kindness in this, as in other things, and actuated by 
that fervent love towards it, which is so natural to a man, who 
views it in the native soil of himself and progenitors, for several gene- 
ratioos, 1 anticipate with pleasing ex|Yectation, that r treat, in which 
I promise myself to realize, withtiut a loy, the sweet enjovmeut of 
partaking, in the mid:it of my fellow citizens, the benign influence of 
food laws under a free government, the ever favorite object of my 
heart, and the happy reward, as I trust, of our mutual cares, labors, 
•ad dangers. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON. 
Unii0^ States, 
iefiember lltk, 1796. 



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Doc, No. S.] [Part L 

ANNUAL REPORT 



or THB 



TREASURER OF STATE, 



OP THB 



STATE OF INDIANA, 



TO TBS 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



DECEMBER. 1850. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

J. P. CHAPMAN. STATE PRINTEK. 

1850. 

im5 



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REPORT- 



OFFICE OF TREASURER OF STATE, ) 

iNDIANAPOUSf NOTBMBBR 1, 1850. ) 

To the General Assembly: 

StaIWKICT of THK WHOLS RbCBIPTS AJID ExPBNDlTUBaS OF TBM 
TrBASUSY fob THX FUGAI. YBAE S]fJ>IN6 TilB 31 »T OF OcTQBntt 

A.D. 1850, vii: 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance in the Treasury on the 1st day of November, 
A. D. 1849, four hundred and twenty-eight thousand 
nine hundred and forty-one dollars and nineteen 
cents, • $428,941 19 



There were received dnrhg the fiscal ye^r, closing 
October 31, 1850, the following amounts, to-wit : 

IleveHU€» 

On account of Revenue of 1843, $222 80 

On account of Revenue of 1846, 557 61 

On account of Revenue of 1847, 100 00 

On account of Revenue of 1848, Ilelinquent, 35,367 17 

On account of Revenue of 1849, 415,114 59 

On account of Revenue of 1850, 4,102 33 

On account of Revenue of 1849, Delinquent, 165 53 

$455,630 02 



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138 



Estates unthout Heirs. 
On account of Estates without Heire, 



$200 89 



State's Prison. 

On account of Snie of old Prison, $709 €4 

On account of Kent of Prison, 10,433 38 

On account of Fees refunded, ^ 2 50 



$11,145 43 



University Fund. 

On account of Loans refunded, 4,730 60 

On account of Sales of Land, Principal, 129 61 

On account of Sales of Land, Interest, » 388 91 

On account of Interest on Loans, 4,390 92 

On account of Costs of Advertising, refunded, 3 00 

$9«477 04 



Saline Fund. 

On account of Loans refunded, $lf804 89 

On account of Interest on Loans, 1^488 83 

On account of Damages on forfeited lAnds, 19 OO 

On account of Sales of Saline Lands, Principal, 1,375 06 

On account of Sales of Saline Landa, Interest, 311 65 



$4,999 45 



Bank Tax Fund. 

On account of Loans refunded, < 

On account of Interest on Loans, 

On account of State Bank Assessment,- • • < 



$395 00 

515 54 

1,073 65 

$1,984 19 



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8ttrph9 Hetfcnue F^rnL 

On acoaunt of Loans refundad, « • $1|282 45 

Od aoooant of Interest on Loans, 515 39 

$1,797 84 

CoJigressionai Township Fund, 

Oa aoooant of Loans refunded, $73 00 

On accoont of Interest on Loans, 101 75 

$174 75 

Treasury Fund. 
On accoant of Interest on Loans, $35 46 

Camnum School Fund. 

On acconnt of Profits of State Bank, from Sinking 
Fand Conunissionen, $55,863 00 

/nrfMwtayelfy -tflff i 
On aceoiml of Sales of Lots, $»» » 

On acoooat of Public Printing Refunded,* • « • $916 00 

On account of Miscellaneous Itemst 100 67 

Oq account of Suspended Debt, 50 00 

Oq account of Insurance Tax,- 116 00 

$483 67 



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140 



Hospital for the Insane. 

On account of Sales of Lots, $699 97 

On account of Loan from Bank, 13,000 00 

$13,699 97 

Deaf and Dumb Asylum, 
On account of Loan from Bank, tl>476 50 



Madison and Indianapolis Railroad. 
On account of Dividend on Stock, $1,129 50 

Nort/iem Divisiofi of Central Canal. 
On account of Water Rents, $2,165 74 

Lawrenceburg and Indianapolis Railroad. 
On account of Loan to Company, $2,061 96 

New Albany and Yincennes Road. 
Op account -of Tolls, ••.. $12,621 97 

RmiUed StalnJUs. 
Osfiecount of Sales of« f65 ^ 



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141 



Wabash and Erie Otmai by Trustees. 

On accoant of Tolls and Water Rents, $252,473 01 
On account of Subscription by Bond- 
holders. • 407.850 00 

On accoant of Canal Lands* £. and W. 

of Tippecanoe, 56,635 32 

On account of Canal Lands, V incennes 

Disuici, 75,422 56 

On account of Interest and Exchang^f 25,114 81 
On account of Error, in Disbursements, 553 00 

On account of Canal Scrip, West of 

Tippecanoe, 22,493 00 

On aooount oi Canal Scrip> Cast, Prin- 
cipal, 12,999 88 

On account of Canal Scrip, East, In* 

terest, 3,61103 

^857,149 61 

Total amount of Receipts from Not. 1st, 1849, to 
Oct. 31st, 1850, inclusive, $1,432,142 78 

Balance in Treasury Nov. 1st, 1849, 428,941 19 

Grand total,- $1,861,383 97 



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im 



EXPENDITURES. 

There have been disbursed during the year, on audited Warrants, 
the following amounts, to-wit : 

Ordinary Expensts. 

On account of Probate Judges, f4,79A 00 

On account of Supreme and Circuit Judges, 14,910 81 

On account of State House, 588 71 

On account of Specific Appropriations, 8,114 99 

On account of Public Printing, Paper and Binding,- • 11,533 49 

On account of Legislative Expenses, 31,010 64 

On account of State Library, 964 81 

On account of The Militia, 63» 17 

On account of Stationery and Fuel, 3,458 13 

On account of Executive Department, 5,877 93 

On account of Contingent Fund, to-wit: 

To Jas. Hughes, Att'y m the McGinley case, $400 00 

To Walpoie & Quarles, Attorneys in the 

McGinley case, *• 400 00 

To Saml H. Buskirk, arbitrator, 105 75 

Transcript of McGinley case, 95 50 

Postage account, 373 38 

Sundry allowances by Gov. Wright 491 67 

1,765 30 

On account of Governor's Circle, 535 34 

On account of Governor's House, (expended chiefly 

in 1849, under Gov. Dunning,) 1,309 56 

Ou account of Transpt. of Public Arms, 79 75 

On account of Sute's Prison, $3,606 63 

On account of Dbtributing Iaws and Journals, • • • • 551 54 

$83,615 10 



Public Debi. 

On account of Interest for January and July, $188,595 00 

On account of Salary and Expenses of Agency to 

close of Collins's term,* • • • ♦ 5,911 i!7 

On account of Col. May's Salary, as Agent, 1,434 93 

On account of Expenses of Agency, 149 66 

$196,090 86 



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m 



On aocouut or Five per c^nts. cancelled, $46,410 00 

On account of Inteiest on same, 16,150 68 

On account of six per cents, cancelled, 86,000 00 

On acooont of Interest on same, 43,067 35 

On account of Quarter per cents, cancelled, 13,165 00 

On account of Interest on same, 902 75 

On account of Incidental expenses of, 261 00 

• 

1904,356 78 



Univernty Fund. 

On account of Loans, $^10,074 00 

On account of Interest Refunded, 28 00 

On account of Damages on Sales of Land, 278 14 

On account of Expenses of Fund,- • • • 352 25 

On account of Professors* Salaries, 3,700 00 



114,332 39 



Saline Fund. 

On account of Damages, 

On account of Distribution of Fund,* • • - 
OlQ account of Purchase of Bank Stock,* 
On account of Expenses of Fund, 



431 08 

6,708 80 

550 00 

75 65 

$7,765 53 



Bant Tax Fwut. 



On account of Distribution of Fund,- 
On accouat of Damages, 



$3^83 18 
41 78 

$3,624 96 



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144 



Surplta Revenue Fund. 

On account of Loans, 500 00 

On account of Distribution of Fund, 342 02 

$848 02 

Congressional Township FutuI. 

On account of Loans, $253 30 

On account of Fund Distributed, 57 30 

$310 60 

Treasury Fund. 
On account of Damages on Loans, $28 64 

Northern Division Central Canal. 

On account of Repairs, • • • • $2,548 58 

On account of Incidental Expenses, • • 1,005 56 

$3,554 14 

New Albany and Vincennes Road. 

On account of Construction, $3,196 02 

On account of Repairs, • 6,193 61 

Qn account of Contingent Expenses, 2,328 85 

On account of Damages, 1 00 

$11,719 48 



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la 



MiacelUne(ms» 

On account of Estates without Heirs,* if*. $392 61 

On account of New State Prison, 13,935 90 

On account of U.&l I. Bailroad Stock,* • * • ^ 84)13 33 

On account of Interest on State Bonds, • 75 00 

On account of Revenue Refunded, • •<• 1,550 ^ 

On account of Constitutional Convention, 1^014 46 

On account of Wabash and Erie Canal, 613 50 



124,494 64 



Benevolent InstUutions. 

On account of Deaf & Dumb Asylum, $87,979 93 

On account of BKnd Asylum, • 11,781 09 

On account of Insane Hospital, • 33,501 33 

On account of Superintendent of Insane Hospital,* • • 1,500 00 

«73,763 34 



Jeffersonvilk tf Crawfordsville Road. 



On account of Construction, 

On account of Incidental Expenses,- 



$16,000 00 
722 00 

$16,722 00 



Wakiik and Brie Canal hy Trustees. 

On account of General Expenses of Trustees,* $28,675 65 

On account of Expenses of Land Office, Yincennes 

District, 1,662 24 

On account of Expenses of Land Office, £. & W. 

Tippecanoe, 4,192 68 

On account of Ordinary Repairs, v 54,871 74 

On account of Extraordinanr Repairs, 35,255 39 

On account of Surveys and Locating;, 20,396 48 

On account of Construction, Coal Creek to Terre 

Haute, 75,634 38 

On account of Constructioui Terre Haute to Pt. Corn- 



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I4C 

mercc, 184,213 07 

On account of Constructiont Ft OommArco to New- 
berry, l^fiOd 87 

On account of Gonstruction» Newberry to MaysrlUe,- 71,550 25 

On account of Constructioni South of Maysville,* • • • 151,444 26 

On account of Dama^ and Water Power, « • • 6,780 50 

On account of Supenntendence, 9,149 17 

On account of Expense of Collection, « • 7,542 59 

On account of Interest to Bondholders, 53,409 68 



$824,987 85 



Wabash ^ Erie Canal Scrip. 

On account of Incidental Expenses Scrip Bast, 45 00 

On account of Incidental Expenses Scrip West, 27 00 

On account of Scrip East Principal Cancelled, 25^53 01 

On account of Scrip East Interest Cancelled, 6,056 70 

On account of Scrip West Cancelled, 15345 00 

47,426 71 
Whole amount of Payments during fiscal year 1850. 
Warrants No. 4154 to No. 52(^ inclusive, $ 1,513,534 04 

General View of tke Finances of the State. 

Balance in the Treasury, Oct 31, 1849, $428,941 19 

Receipts of Fiscal Year, 1850, 1,432,442 78 

$1,861,383 97 
Deduct Warrants Paidasabove, 1,513,534 04 

Leaves a balance in the Treasury, on the 1st day of 

November, 1850, of. $347349 93 



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147 

The following is a more particular statement of the amounts 
appropriated, and paid, according to law, during the last year, to 
the Asylam for the Deaf and Dumb, the HcMfpital for the Insane, 
and the Institaticm for the BUnd: 

Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb. 

Assessments of Revenue for 1849, ao4 Delinquent 

Revenaefor 1848,* $36,507 43 

Amom&t of Loan,- • 1,476 59 

$27,983 93 

Eappendiiures. 

Paid^mOrdara, $37,979 92 

Balance in Treasury,- • • - 4 01 

$37,983 93 



HosfUal Jw the Inrnju. 

Assenments of Revenue for 1849, and Delinquent 

Revenue for 1848, $20|616 89 

Loen fimoi Commisaioners of SUnking Fund, I3/M)0 00 

aileofLot% 699 97 

$34,316 86 

PkidoaOnien» 32,501 33 

BkiuiM in TwMory, $1315 53 



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148 



Institution for the Blind. 



Assessments of Revenue for 1849, and Delinquent 

Revenue for 1848, $11,781 09 



E:^aenditiires. 
Paid on Orders, $1 1 ,781 09 



Of the balance which appears in the Treasury, $194,910 09 is in 
the hands of the Trustees of the Wabash and Erie Canal. The 
residue consists of Treasury Notes and State Scrip, redeemed and 
ready to be cancelled. 

Of the audited warrants of the fiscal vear, two issued to Patrick 
McGinley, one for $11,000, and the otW for $5,000, on account 
of construction of Crawfordsville and Jeffersonville Road, and 
which appeal in the above Report as having been paid, are yet out- 
standing. They were presented at this office for payment, but were 
refused for the two following reasons : 

1st. I had been notified, by the proper parties, that proceedings 
were to be instituted in the Supreme Court, in order to a more thor- 
ough examination of the matter in regard to which they were 
drawn. 

2ndly. No appropriation had been made by the Legislature, au- 
thorizing a payment of the character contemplated in the warrants. 
These reasons will, 1 believe, be sufficient to satisfy the public of 
the propriety of my course in relation to the matter. 

A warrant issued to the Sheriff of Union County, amounting to 
$32 50, which also appears paid, is yet outstanding. 

In order that I might be aole to meet the January Interest of the 
State debt, and the expense of the Gcmstitutional Convention, I issu- 
ed circulars to all the County Treasurers, earnestly requesting them 
to make as heavy advances as possible upon the Revenue of 1850, 
A' large number of them have responded nobly to the call, enabling 
the State to meet her demands nearly, if not entirely^ without bor* 
rowing money. I would suggest to your honorable body the pro- 
priety of affording to them that have, or will have made pre-pay- 
ments of Revenue, a liberal compensation. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. P. DRAKE, Treasurer. 



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Doc. No. 4.] [Part. I. 

ANNUAL REPORT 



or TM B 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



or THt 



STATE OF INDIANA, 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 
J. Vi ORAPMAH. 8TATB PRlHTBRi 

1850. 
IDH 



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REPORT. 



OFFICE OP THE SECRETARY OF STATE, ) 
Indiahapqjus, Dscxmbbb, 1850. J 

To the.Oeneral AssenMy of the State of Indiana : 

In compliance with law the undersigned has the honor to submit 
the following as his annual report for the year 1850: 

Contracts for the distribution of the Laws and Journals of the 
last session of the L^islature were made with the following named 
persons, and at the rates herein mentioned, to- wit: 

In the Ist Judicial Circuit, by Wm. Kerns, at $30 00 

In the 2nd Judicial Circuit, by Joseph A. Brown, at 36 00 

In the 3d Judicial Circuit, by Henry Pope, at 21 00 

In the 4th Judicial Circuit, by Benjamin McCluer, at 38 00 

In the 5th Judicial Circuit, by David H. Strickland at 9 00 

In the 6th Judicial Circuit, by George Newland, at 14 75 

In the 7th Judicial Circuit, by Martm S. Toon, at 24 74 

In the 8th Judicial Curcuit, by Henry S. Rockey, at 60 00 

In the 9th Judicial Circuit, by William Parker, at 70 00 

In the 10th Judicial Circuit, by J. T. Williams, at 54 00 

In the 11th Judicial Circuit, by William Turpin« at 40 00 

In the 12th Judicial Circuit, by Silas Harris, at 48 95 

In the 13th Judicial Circuit, by Hubbard Williams, at* • • • 18 00 

The contracts so made have been iiaithfully performed, and the 
undersigned takes this occasion to say that at the time of making the 
agreements it was not known that the eighth volume of Blackford*^ 
Reports would be ready for distribution; consequently no mention 
of them was made in the publication for proposals to distribute the 
Laws and Journals. They were however distributed by the person3 
above named, and also one additional box carried to the new county 
(>f Stark. Claims were presented by the several contractors to the 
Auditor, Treasurer and Secretary of State for additional pay for 



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154 

such service; but doubting our power to make auy allowance with- 
out authority of law for that purpose we refused to make such ad- 
ditional compensationt and of course the matter is referred to the 
consideration of the Legislature. The laws of the land form a part 
of every contract, and how far the distributers were bound to know 
what was to be carried is a matter wholly submitted to your judgment, 
and especially in regard to the additional box of Laws and Journals 
conveyed to Stark county. 

It is proper here to state that the Hon* Isaac Blackford has deliv- 
ered to the State 494 copies of the eighth volume of reports as fol- 
lows, to-wit: 

Poifr ^piqf for each of ninety-one counties, 364 

On^ copy for e^ch pf thirty-one States, • • • 31 

One copy for each of four Territories, 4 

For Library of Congress, 1 

For Sute Libi*ary,. 10 

For Secretary q{ State, (in State Library,) 75 

One copy for each gf six coHeges, * 6 

For Indiana Law Library,* • » I 

Fqr District Court of the United States,^ 1 

For Clerk's office of Snpreme Court,. • . * I 

Total* 494 

All of which *has been furnished the State within the last year in 
compliance with joint resolutions of this State, entitled << Joint Reso- 
lution respecting Bfeckford's Reports,'* first approved Feb- 1, 1836, 
and the second approved Feb. 4, 1837. The eighth volume is 
gotten up in the creditable style with the others of the same series 
by the same able reporter. In the language of the editor of the 
Monthly Law Magazine, published in New York, **In everything 
calculated to enhance their value they are complete. The printing 
and, binding is in the best taste, and may serve to indicate the dis- 
crimination, elegance, and usefulness of the contents." 

Contracts have been made to furnish the ensuing session, of the 
Legislature with stationery as follows, viz: 242 reams of printing 
paper at 10 cents per pound, equal to about $3 30 per ream. 227 
reams of printing paper at $2 50 per ream, (the latter a superior 
article to the first.) Also, 10 reams of No. 11 ruled cap at $3 00 
per ream, and 10 reams of envelope paper at 93 50 per ream, all of 
which was purchased of the Hon. P. M. Kent. Also, Messrs* Ross 
& Ray have agreed to deliver 96 reams of ruled letter No. 15, at 
$2 20 per ream, 10 reams of letter (English blue laid,) No. 9, at 
$2 60 per ream, 4 reams letter (English blue laid) at $4 00 per 
ream, and 10 reams plain letter at ^ 20 per ream. The larger 
portion of the paper so contracted for has already been received 
and is found on examination fully equal, and much of it superior to 



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155 

the samples exhibited at the time of making the contracts. In fact 
the paper is good enoi]^h for all ordinary purposes, and at very low 
rates. It is hoped the quality of the paper is such as to preclude the 
necessity of sending the door keepers of either branch of the Gen- 
eral Assembly to the various book stores of this city to procure sta- 
tionery, without regard to prices, at the suggestion of the clerks or 
individual members of either House. Tlus practice heretofore in 
some instances adopted is of doubtful expediency, and subjects the 
State to imposition. In case of a deficiency in quantity the State in 
her contracts has provided for a further supply. 

A contract has been made with Mr. James blake for 150 cords of 
dry wood at $1 50 per cord, 75 cords of which was to be delivered 
on the first day of Uctober last and 75 by the firat of December 
thence next following. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. TEST, 

Secretary of Siate. 



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Doe, No. §.] • [Ptet I. 

FIFTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OT 1WB WARDBH OP TBI 

INDIANA STATE PRISON, 

FOR THE lEAB ENDING NOT. 90, 1850. 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



or 



8TATE OF INDIANA. 



INDIANAPOLI^ 

J. f. CHAFMAM. 8TATB PEDim. 

1851. 
ID17 



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REPORT- 



Ta tke Oenertd Ammbly of the SUOe of Indiana: 

In eonfonnity to law the underrigoed Warden of the Indiana 
State Priaon» respectfully submits the following annual report : 

The bathing house authorized by an Act of the Legislature has 
been constructed in pursuance to said act, and has been found useful 
in preserTing the health and cleanliness d* the convicts. 

The hospital building is not yet completed ; two stories have been 
erected since the last report of the Warden, and it is expected that the 
building wiU be completed early next spring. 

The fire engine authorized by an act of the Legislature to be pur- 
chased, has hem obtained. The city of Jeffersonville has at her own 
expense erected an engine house within a convenient distance from 
the prison, and her citizens have organized a fire company to take 
cha^ of said engine. 

Two hundred and seventeen volumes of moral and religious books 
selected by Miss Diz, have been purchased for the use of the convicts. 

No change has been made in the by-laws and regulations hereto* 
tofore estaUished for the government of the prisoners. The convicts 
generally are well dispoe^ and obedient. The moral and religious 
instruction of the Rev. Geo. B. Jocelyn, chaplain to the prison, has 
bad a happy influence upon the convicts. About twenty-five of the 
convicts on an average during the past summer were employed at 
woffc in the brick yara adjoining the prison. During the previous 
winter about the same number were engaged in choppinff wood to 
be used in burning brick. A few have worked occasionally on the 
farm of the lessee and on jobs in the city of Jefiersonville. The 
remainder have been employed within the prison walls, at shoemaking, 
coopering, wagon making, tailoring, house carpentering, dec, and 
the domestic labors of the prison. 

The convicts have not been unreasonably worked, and their gen- 
eral health good. The chotera broke out in tke prison last summer 



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Its. 

and twenty-six died of that disease. The prisoners have been rega- 
larly supplied with suitable food and clothing, beds and bedding. 
The accompanying tables from one to sixteen inclusive are referred 
to as exhibiting in detail the number received and discharged durins 
the past year together with such other facts, as have been deemed 
important or interesting in relation to the convicts. 

DAVID W. MILLER. 
NOVXMBER 30, 1850. 



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TABK£lf0.1 

Total in confineoieat as per report the 30Ui Noveaber, IMA, iSI 

Since received,* >»'• * ** ft 

Aigitivei petaken, 1 



I>i8chaiged b(y exfiiraiCieii of aeniMe*, SB 

Diiduuqged by Paidon,* • • •• • « 141 ' 

Diichaiied by Death, 8& 

DiacfaaiBedby Escape, .••««•. 2 • 

Sentence xevened by Supreme Court,- «•••• 1 



Total number Dom in confinement,* • 4^ 



TABISNO.S 

B imp i ng tie maimre of ike e^wiog; 

(Mences agaimt property, 114 

Oflences against penons, SB 

Total, 1^ 



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Vor Mwder, ♦ 11 

Wor Manslaughter, • 3 

For Grand L£roeny» *•• 61 

For Pettit Larceny, S 

IScfir Larceny, 16 

For Assault and Battery with intent to eoniRNt Hiiider,- • • • 4 

For Rape, - S 

For Robbery, * ••• 1 

For Burglary, ••..*••.••.......* 8 

For Fotgery, • • •• • • ^ 

Wor Anon, 4 

For Assault and Battery and Larceny with intent to commit 

Rape, 1 

For Assault and Battery with intent to commit Murder, Bur- 
glary and Larceny, 1 

For Receiving stolen goods,* • • 1 

For Horse Stealing, 1 

For Grand Larceny and Peijury, 1 

For Incest, 1 

For Asseult and Battery with intent to commit Rape, 2 

For Burglary and Larceny, • • • 3 

For Retaining counterfeit apparatus, • 1 

For Grand larceny and Receiving stolen goods, 1 

For Robbing the United Stotes Mbil, 1 

Total, .••- 143 



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i<6 



fAMS ifO. 4. 



ShcwB ike names of convicts discharged by expiration of seTitenct, 
since the 30th day of November, 1849, up to the ZOth day of No- 
vember, 1850. 



1. David Benshaw, March II, 1850. 

± Samuel J. Shepherd, March 17, 1850. 

3. Aaron T 

4. Abner 1 

5. Frederi< 

6. Lawflon iO. 

7. John Lc 

8. £Iizabet 

9. Philips 

10. Lewis I] 

11. William 

12. Ruben £ 

13. Daniels 

14. Joseph I 1850. 

15. Thomas 850. 

16. George Jones, September 17, 1850. 

17. William Moore, September 17, 1850. 

18. John Sanford, September 17, 1850. 

19. Vincent Lodlow, September 30, 1850. 
90. Christopher Kaufman, October 4, 1850. 
31. Samuel Reff, October 4, 1850. 

33. Gilbert Watkins, October 16, 1850. 

33. John Thompson, October 37, 1850. 

34. John R. McCoy, October 39, 1850. 

35. Daniel McEnair, November 13, 1850* 

36. James R. Hall, November 16, 1850. 

37. Peter H. Longer, November 33, 1850. 

38. George Allen, November 35, 1850. 



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Hf 



8hmD9 the names and number of convicts pardoned since the 30lA of 
November^ 1849, to the 20th qf November, 1850. 

1. Thomas Rogers, December 6, 1849. 

3. Richard Tewel, December 19, 1849. 

3. John Tice, February 3, 1850. 

4. Gharlei 

5. Ghristo 

6. Nathai 

7. Daniel 

8. Edwin 

9. James 

10. Daniel 

11. WiUiai 

12. Samuel 

13. Louis' 

14. Bergef 

15. Daniel 

16. Merritt 



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l«l 



TAfitB NO. t. 



Sh$m $ke mimet mml nmmkr of prisomm deetued ritme ike Vkh 
day ef Ntumfitr, IMf. to«be JOthtkyx^ Nnmiu, 1850. 

1. JohnCooper, Decembcf98, 1849. 

2. John Thomas, Jaouarjr 13, 1850. 

3. Jacob Jdofting, Fabraary 11, 1850. 

4. Robert WUsoD, January 22. 1850. 

5. Wren Clark, February 24, 1S50. 
«. Charles Watson, March 27, 1850. 

7. John Walker, April 16, 1850. 

8. WUliam H. Adams, July 25, 1850. 

9. Peter Minor, July 28, 1850. 

10. Massa Powers, July 31, 1850. 

11. William C. Tinslay* Aiuust 4, 1850. 

12. Patrick Smith, August 4, 1850. 

13. Samuel Clark, Au^ 6, 1850. 

14. Dfvid D. Sanden, August 8, 185a 

15. Thornton Clevinger, Aqgast 10, 1850. 
IS. Henry Carp, Aufwt 12, 1850. 

17. Clark Crawfoid, Av^ust 13, 1850. 

18. William Sheerer, AusQst 13, 1850. 

19. David Root, Augvst Is, 1850. 

20. WiUiam OreU, August 13, 1850. 

21. Samuel Crow, August 13, 1850. 

22. Harrison White, (Mulatto) August 14, I860. 

23. AUen Brooks, Ai«uet 15, 1850. 

24. Lewis Terry, (n^fro) August 15, 1850. 

25. William Emmons, (a«gr^ August 15, 1850. 

26. WiUiam Murry^Awost It, im 

27. William WiUiUBM, August 16, 185a 

28. Gharies Bradley, At^ost 17, 1850. 

29. Geoi^ Phili|% AitgoM 19^ 185a 

30. John McIntiEe, Aii^^ 20, ISSa 

31. Beiyamin FrankUa, (Mulatto) Ai^ust 20, 1850. 

32. James Bro^o,Aitttti( 26, 1850. 

33. William Warner, August 26, 1850. 

34. GeornQuiMBbenb(AKtob«-.19,1850. 

35. SM&utlWaml, S&Mtber 16. 18Sa 



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Iff 



TABLE NO/ r 

Skm» ike aumet and time ef cammela eeetqted unee the 9fM dmg i 
mmfemker, 184», totkeiSHk AbttMo^t itt*. 

1. Elfonzo Estell, May 16, 18B0. 

5L Joseph Crape, August 15, 18S0. 

3. William Cousiot, (M.) November 15, 1810. 



TABLE NO. & 
Showing the counties from tchicA the convicts tjoere s^nt. 



Adams, • • • 
Allen, ••• 
Clark,**- 

Cass, 

Crawford,* 
Carroll,. * * 
Clinton, * * 
Dearborn,* 



Daviess, 4 

Decatur, ••*• • 1 

Delaware,* • * * 2 

Dubois, I 

Elkhart, « 

Floyd, 8 

Fayette, 3 

Fulton, 3 

Fountain, * 1 

Franklin, .*.*.-.. 3 

Greene *•'...' .•...1 

Harrison, •? 

Hancock, • * 1 

Jefferson, • • •.*...... 10 

Jennings, '•.•.•...! 

Johnston, 2 

Knox,* 5 

Lake, 2 

Lagrange, 1 

Laporte, 4 

Mont^mery,* * • • * 2 



Miami, 



Marion, ••...•• 

NoWe 

Ohio, 

Orange, 

Owen, *••• 

Posey,.*.- 

Pertpy, 

Porter, • *' 

Parke,-....*... 

Randolfrfi, 

iUptey, 

Rush, 

Scott, 

Spenoer, «* 

Switeerland,* -^< 

SteuboQ, * 

St. Joseph, 

TippeoMoe, * . * 
Union, .-.i. . . 
Vanderbai|fb,* ^ 
Vlge,....i ...- 
Washington, * • < 
Wnyne...^. * 

Wells, 

Warrick, 

WhiUey, 

White, 



ToUl, 



.14! 



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(IABE£9I0/!L 

SlmoB M« number.f^ tmmvidiMsaf ear A fsmniei. 

ffiwt time, •.•••• ••••.••!•••. t •• •. 131 

Second timt, 9 

Third time, ,.. i 

Fourth time, • 1 

Total, .••• '142 



TA9t^ »0. H^ 
Siwn the Ncfiivi^jf ^ the convict*. 



New York, 13 

Kentocky, ....... . . .....' 9 

Indiana, • • • • S3 

North Carolina, 2 

nSnois, • • 1 

Gonnecticot 2 

Ohio, 19 

Maryland, 4 

Virginia.- 15 

Missonri, 1 

Sooth Carolina, 1 

Tenneese, 5 

Delaware, • 1 

Rhodebland, .« 1 

PeaosylTaniat ,• • 14 



Massachusetts,* • 
'Vermont, • •* •'. • 

Louisiana, 

Canada, 

France, 

Ireland, 

Germany,. • . • • • 

England, • 

Switzerland,. . . * 
Scotland, •••••• 

Italy, 

South America,* 



Total, < 



I 

2 
1 

9 
7 
3 
1 
3 
1 
I 

7« 



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4HD 

TABLE SK). n. 

Shoming tkegradeaof education €f the amvicU. 

Who have no education,* • • • • • 25 

Who can read only, 25 

<Who can read and write, 81 

>Who have a good English education, •• * . . 1 

Total, 1« 



TABLE NO. 19. 

Skomng their habiis of life as reported by themeetvee. 

Intemperate, 61 

Moderate drinkers,* • • 25 

Temperate, • • St 

Total H 



TABLE no. 19. 

SkMoitig their tocial nlations. 

Married, 54 

Single, 75 

Widowen, 1 J 

Total, Ti 



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TJtBUt mx u. 

8ko¥)Uig their race €miM9. 

Wliite nudes, .«••• •••..>....;. ]9s' 

Hick males, , , . 7 

MttlattOM, * . , 7 

Total, J^ 



TABLE NO. 15. 

Skowing the length of sentence in thisprieon. 

Por 36 years, 1 

For 21 years, 3 

For 14 years, 1 

For 12 years, 2 

For 10 years, 7 

For 8 years, 2 

For 7 years, 7 

For 6 years, • • . . • 3 

For 5 years, • II 

For 4 years, 11 

For 3 years, 15 

For 3 years and six months, 2 

For 2 years and six months, 2 

For 2 years, • ^ . 65 

For 1 year, 1 

For I year and nine months, 1 

For life, 8 

Total, 142 



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TiMBuma le.* 

Skoaring the age if ammets at the tim* «f their canvktim. 

Uo4er SO veius, » 

Ffom 90 to 30 yean, t^ 

FVooi 30 to 40 jrcara, 3B 

From 40 to SO yean, 16 

FioindO.toeOytan, 10 

Total '. I4S 



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PHFfilCIAFS KEPORT- 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT, | 

Indiaha Statb PBiaoNy Dbckmbke 1, 18S0. ) 

a W. Miuu, £04., 

Warden af ih^ hditma SMe P^i$on : 

Sir : — Since the date of my last report relating to the Ileepital 
affainof the Institution of whidi you are the Warden, I have to 
record a greater mortality than for any year during fny lonff cob- 
nectlon with the Prison as its Physician.* In the month of Jiuy that 
avful scourge the cholera made a visitation and continued for six 
weeks, a portion of which time its violence was as great as ever 
characterized it at any point in this or any other country. Bcrfbtia 
it left us ^veq^ convict was attacked with it in one form or otherp 
and although about one-fifth of the whole number died, yet there 
was severe! cases of recovery from the worst stages of the disease* 
My great aim was to keep those who were attacked with the first 
stji^es of the disease, from going into the lasU To tliis end I toiled 
sight and day, and I hope with success. 

The table in your report upon the subject, taken from the Hospital 
register, shows the number who died of thtd disease and also the 
mortality from othet diseases, which is about the average of former 
years. For the last four months and at (bis time the health of tlie 
convicts is good. 

1 have no particolar sumestions to make in regard to the HosfMtal 
anangement. The new Hospital, the building of which has been so 
p«rseveringly prosecuted by yourself, and which has been so much 
needed for the promotion of the comfort of the sick convict, is now 
Dearly ready for occupancy. It is designed to can*y out arrangements 
which I hope will greatly facilitate recovery from sickness in future, 
particularly on the advent of diseases of an epidemic character. 

The sntiiation of Physician to a prison is truly embarrassing and 



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174 

perplexing. Most of the convicts are the victims of idleness. Bat 
few are disposed to labor, and their first attempts at the artifices, so 
frequently practiced by them before thev are sent here, are made 
upon the physicinn. Outside they would sooner steal than work, 
now they must feign disease to avoid the sentence of the law. The 
** old soldier," is ii game that all convicts soon learn to play, and it 
requires the greatest experience in their ways to circumvent them 
in their plan to palm themselves upon the '^Doctor'* as doubtfal 
cases. My plan has always been to turn none away who apply to 
mo for aid ami complain of * beintf sick. A tialf dr whole of a 
day, however, iii the Hospital will test the genuineness of their 
physical complaints, and of this time they have the advantage. 
Humanity teaches that the test should be applied and that none 
filiould be turned away even if one doubt the sincerity of the appli- 
cant. 

My iavariable practice is to apply the test and if I have my doubts 
in regard to the matter, I resolve those doubts in favor of the con- 
vicUK— if those are caueht once, the attempt to deceive is hardly ever 
renewed. The class of feigned diseases are as Bumerods almost as 
are the real ones, and it is a nice point sometimes to detect the true 
from the false, i trust that I have tm^t erred i^iitst humanity in 
my course with this unfortunate and misguided class of human be^ 
•iMf in tny .loo^' experience with their diseases. 

1 could greaiiy extend this report with some interesting facts in 
ngard to prison disciplie, and the treatment of the convict, gathered 
(torn time to time during my relation to the prison* 1 may at some 
fiuure time put those in shaj»e and present them for the consideratioa 
of those wboee duty it b to legislate for the criminal The subjoined 
tabid shows as U41ows: 

No. of days lost, 1893 

No. of admissions into the hospital, • • • • <7S 

No. of deaths from cholera, JN 

No. of deaths from other diseases — most of thfHfn of a 
'* chronic character and long standing previous to com* 

mitment, * 9 

• JH gives .me great pleasure to say that I have had your co-operatiou 
im any suggestions I have made, calculated to benefit the sanitary 
N^tetiao of tte Hospital and Prison* 

Respectfully» 

W, P. COLLUM. 



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CHAPLAIN'S REPORT. 



D, W. mibr. Warden cf ikehdiana State Prison: 

Sat: — AceordiDg to the requirtment of Iaw»I hereby submit to 
yoa tbe foUowing report : 

I entered upon the duties of Chaplain to the Indiana State Prison, 
Sept. 5» 1850, with the determination to be the instrument in the 
haads of God, of doing some good. During the time intervening 
between the chaplain's last report, and the eommencement of my 
duties, I can say good was done. He accomplished something, and 
his name is kindly remembered by those, whom 1 have beard speak 
of him. I trust he, also will report to you. 

The better to accomplish the object for which the chaplain is 
appointed, as many as possible under the circumstances, have been 
personally conversed with upon the subject of religion. Believing 
that the Bible is the great meanff by which reforms are to be success- 
fully carried on in heart and life, immediate steps were taken to form 
trible and religious classes. (And at this date, December 15, 1850, 
two bible classes exist, and one class composed of those who have 
openly professed a *' desire to flee the wrath to come.") The most 
of those with whom conversation has been had upon religious sub- 
jects seem anxious to become better men. The opportunities they 
enjoy for mental and moral improvement, are probably as great as 
could be expected under the present system — a system, however, far 
from being perfect. Much more good mighf, doubtless, be accom- 
plished, if the chaplain was required to reside at the prison, and de- 
vote his entire attention to its inmates, during such hours as would 
not interfere with the duties they owe to the lessee. Nights, until 
bed-time and noons, as well as Sabbaths, could then be devoted to 
them. The sick could be regularly visited, and impressions might 
be made, that would produce the happiest results. Those who would 
gladly welcome the chaplain to their cells could be attended to, and 
^boee who cannot read (of whom there is a goodly number) could be 
1D18 



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176 

taught to read} and thus be furnished with a means to lighten many 
a weary' hour of confinement* and to open to their minds* and hearti 
another avenue of information. The residence of the chaplain at 
the prison, his daily presence amongst its inmates, and his observ- 
ance of their daily walk, would aid greatly in their reformation. 
The time, that, under the present system, the chaplain has found to 
devote to them has been confined to Saturday nights and Sabbaths, 
and has been so completely occupied in hearing the bible classes, and 
preaching, that this report is necessarily barren upon those very top- 
ics which would be most interesting to y6u/ 

While, comparatively speaking, there are many opportunities for 
reformation, and there is great reason to hope that the incarceration 
of the prisoners here, is, in many instances, of salutary influence, 
there are many things that have a deleterious effect. A lack of 
uniformity in the penalties inflicted by the various courts for offences 
similar in almost all their details, — *the fact that those who are here 
on one indictment can, at the ecxpiratioii of their pceaeat tens, be 
taken at the prison-gate, by some sheriff, hurried off to some jail, to 
await trial and conviction, and be retorned for an offence similar to 
the one for which they have already suffered the penalty of the kw, 
and, that, too, ere they have had opportunity to convince friends or 
enemies, by a reformed liie» that punishment has already had its desired 
effect; — the dread with which some again mingle with society after 
the Idgal expiration of their sentences because di^ranchisemend has 
been attached as a part of the penalty, thus virtually keeping the 
badge of the convict upon them after their odl doors are throwa 
open; — these, and other facts that could be named have a stroag 
tendency to sour the dispositions, harden the hearts of the unfortu- 
nate prisoners, and render them careless upon the subject of moral 
reform^ — and it too often causes them to conclude that the law and 
its officers are their personal enemies* and not the administers of 
justice. 

These thoughts, some may think, should not have found ex* 
pression here^ but if these facts are evils that should be, and can be 
reniedied,wby not briag them to view here, and at this time? And I 
feel confidentin reporting them to you, that if in yoor estimati<m they 
are evils, tba romovai of which would tend to the refermalioa of tl» 
prisoners, youi- kind hearts wiU prooipt you to give yoor aid and in- 
fluence in favor c^ some pla» that wiU, aa iar as poauUer Yenedy 
these evils. 

Reformation is the great elgeet of puaisbmeEfr»-«B£t that iaet 
should ever he uppermost in the mindi of all who are ia aay way 
connected, with the prisoBer» either as hie law*maker» exector, or 
adviser. The prtsoaer, however guilty he may be» it w a JeOmD 
brother^ and while liie laets^ e£R»rta should be made to redeem him. 

•Seo taUe A in Ui« Wvdfln** npoit, aad bsi CMwinoed ef tbs Inth. if tbe 

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177 

For him how fervent should be the prayers of the righteous — and I 
have such confidence in their prayers, that were all God's people of 
every denomination, to plead with €hd in behalf of the convict, re- 
' vivals of pure and undented religion, would be poured down into our 
prisoQSy and many a heart that is now filled with hate's dark thoughts, 
would realize a Savior's love, and the bright beams of the Sun of 
Righ teousnes would scatter the thick darkness of many a prisoner's cell 
his moral shackles would fall off, and freedom, spiritual, heavenly 
freedom would be imparted to him. God bless the prisoner. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEO. B. JOCELYN, Chaphin. 



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D oc. No. 6. ] _ _ [ Part. I . 

REPORT 



AUDITOR OF STATE, 



ULATrVE TO TBB 



NUMBER OF INHABITANTS OF THE STATE, &C. 



MO COPIES ORDERED TO BE PRINTED, JANUARY 3, 1851. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 
J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 
1851. 
1D19 



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REPORT. 



OFFICE OF AUDITOR OF STATE, ) 
Indianapolis, Janvaby 2, 1851. ) 

Hon. Jaxes H. Lane, Presiiubnt of the Senate: 

Sir — I have the honor of submitting an abstract of the enu- 
meration of vrhite males over 21 years of age, in the State of Indi- 
ana, also of the Deaf and Dumb, Blind and Lunatic, in said State, 
as returned to me by the several County Auditors, under the provis- 
ions of an Act of the Legislature at its last session. 

The Jdturns are complete, except from the counties of Jefferson, 
Posey and Stark, in which no enumeration was taken. The sum 
total of these returns is as follows: 

Total White Males over 21 years of age, - - - 181354 

Total Deaf and Dumb, ..... 508 

Totol Blind, 281 

Total Lunatic, 629 

The taxable polls for the yetr 1850 in the Delinquent Counties 
were as follows: 

In Jefferson County, 3,300 

In Posey County, 2,029 

In Stark County, 82 

Total, 5,411 

An addition of 90 per cent* which would be nearly a correct esti- 
mate, would make the total in these Counties 6,493, and the total 
white males in the State over 21 years 188^47. The returns from 
Marion County embrace the Deaf & Dumb, Blind, and Lunatic in 
the several Asylums, and may, in some instances, include those al- 
ready returned by the other counties. 

I am, very respectfully, &;c., 

E. W. H. ELLIS, 

Auditor of State. 



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182 



Abstract of the Enumeration for 1850 of White Maks over twenty 
one years of oge in t/ie State of Indiana; also of the Deaf and 
Dumbj BliTidf and Lunatic in said State. 



jv«. 



Coumtiu. 



WkiU 

Males pner 


Dsaf and 
Dumb. 


Bttui. 


Lu»m 


81 years. 








M34 


1 


4 


, 5 


3,214 




4 




2,585 




4 




206 








516 








S,«j21 


11 


8 


1 IB 


774 








2,314 




1 


4 


2,015 




4 


8 


3,212 




7 


1 17 


1.442 




1 


7 


8,222 




4 


8 


14»I 




4 


1 B 


1,828 




4 


1 8 


3,661 




4 


1 7 


2,969 




1 


1 2 


1,637 




1 


; 1 


2,168 




5 


I 9 


1,220 




1 




2,541 




3 


! 1 


2,024 




1 


1 7 


3,116 






3 


2*,5Si 


ti 


4 


! tf 


3.748 




3 


5 


1.144 


g 


3 


8 


2,140 




I 


« 


2,122 








2.177 




8 


n 


2^102 




3 




1,729 




5 


9 


2,757 






IS 


2,529 




10 


3 


3,221 


s 


8 


5 


1,247 




8 




1,510 




2 


8 


2,007 




4 




645 








1,259 




3 


4 


2,150 






3 


2,330 




4 


16 


2,160 




8 


6 


1,939 




8 


5 


1,594 




3 


2 


871 




8 


3 


2,478 




6 


1 


2,248 




3 


7 


2,694 








4,226 




31 


81 


1,026 




10 


1 


1,154 




3 


7 


2,235 




I 


1 


2,044 




2 


5 


3.388 




5 


80 


2,599 




2 


5 


1,449 




1 




940 








2,113 




3 


13 


2,128 




7 


12 


2,694 




6 


8 


1,553 




5 


17 


1,679 


3 


2 


3 


1,066 




2 


7 


531 




1 


1 


3.320 


8 


4 


16 


2,651 


10 


7 


14 



1 ,Ad&ma, . 
8 " 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



Allen, 
Bartholomew, 

Benton, 

Blackford, . . . . 

Boone, 

Brown 

Carroll. 

Case, 

Clark, 



11 Clay, . 

18 '" 

13 

14 

IS 

16 

17 



Clinton 

Crawford,.... 

Davieas 

Dearborn, ... 

Decatur, 

Dekalb 

18 Delaware, ... 

19 , Dubois, 

99 Elkhart 

21 iFayette, 

28 Floyd, 

83 Fountain,.... 

84 Franklin, ... 

85 iFulton, 

26 ,Gibaon, 

517 jGrant, 

28 Greene, 

89 Hamilton, . . . 
3U [Hancock,.... 

31 I Harrison, .... 

32 'Hendricks,... 

33 Henry. 

34 iHowaid 

35 Huntington, . 

36 Jackson, .... 

37 'Jasiter, 

JeflTerson, .... 

Jennings, .... 

Johnson, 

Knox, 

Kosciusko. . . 

Lagrange. ... 

Uke. 

Laporte, 

47 Lawrence, . . . 
4P {Madison 

49 Marion •«..•. 

50 Marshall 

51 Martin, 

52 Miami. . 
83 Monroe, 
54 
.55 
56 



Montgomery, . 

Morgan, 

Noble, 

57 Ohio, 

58 lOrange, 

59 tOwen. 

60 'Parke, 

61 'Perry, 

as jPlke 

63 iPorter. 

64 iPosey, 

65 IPulaski 

66 'Putnam, 

67 Randolph, 



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183 

Abstract of tie Enumeration for 1850 of White Males over twenty- 
one years of age in the State of Indiana; also of the Deaf and 
Dumbf Blind, and Lunatic in said State. — Continued. 



Jtrm, 



C#«»l>'««. 



Mml*9 0t9r 
31 yMr#. 



D4^f and 
Duwa, 



BUnd. 



Lunatic 



70 
71 
19 
•73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
7« 
7» 
flO 
81 



84 

85 



87 
88 



Hipley, 

Rush, 

Scott, 

Shelby 

Spencer, 

Steoben, 

St. Joeeph, . . . 
SnlllTEii, .... 
SwitxerUnd, , 
Tippecanoe, . 

Tipton, 

Union, 

Vanderboigb, 
Vennillion, .. 

Vigo 

W&baib 

Wurren 

Warrick, .... 
Wtabington, 

Wayne, 

Welle, 

White 

Whitley 



J 



3,317 
1,190 
9,800 
1,506 
1,507 
9,376 
1,888 
9,413 
3,948 
089 
1,451 
9,454 
1,018 
S,1U3 
9,497 
1,555 
1.707 
9,060 
4,789 
1,291 
??6 
070 



1 
18 



4 
7 
1 

10 
9 

9 

4 
4 

9 
1 
6 
4 
8 



13 



a 
1 



ToUl, 181,854 



508 



961 



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Doc. No. 7.] [Part I . 

VETO MESSAGE 



or 



GOVERNOR WRIGHT, 



OF 



HOUSE BILL NO. 4. 



IN RBI.ATION TO THE 



TERRE HAtlTE AND RICHMOND RAIL ROAD, &c. 



1,000 COPIBS ORDERED TO BE PRINTED, JAN. 9, 1851. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 
J. p. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 
1850. 
1D20 

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MESSAGE. 



€kntlemen of the House of RepreseutativeM : 

I herewith return you the bill of your House, No. 4, 
being an act authorizing the Terre Haute and Richmond Railroad 
Company to issue bonds, d^c, with roy reasons for withholding my 
signature. 

This bill authorizes the company to issue bonds, to sell the same 
withih or out of this State, to bear any rate of interest per annum 
and to sell the same at such rates and for such prices, as may be 
agreed upon, and that such sales, though made at a discount, shall be 
valid, as if sold at par. There is in this company county stock. There 
is not a Railroad in progress in this State, in which there is not ei* 
ther coantj or city stock. This work is an important one, it is a 
part of one of the great thoroughfares of the State: it is managed 
by the most prudent men of the country who have embarked a large 
amount of their capital in the enterprise and who deserve to receive 
the aid of the L^ipBlature, and nothing but a sense of duty, compels 
me to return this bill for your reconsideration. During the last ses- 
sion, a short time after the commencement of my duties, the same 
question was presented to me. I took occasion then, in a special 
message to offer some suggestions. Time has only served to con- 
vince roe of the correctness of the opinions then advanced, and I , 
take this opportunity, in the investigation of this subject, to refer you 
to a portion of the views I then onered, with such additional argu- 
ments as my time will allow me to lay before you. Irrespective of 
the question as to the propriety of counties and cities in their corpo- 
rate capacity subscribing to the stock of such works, it is clear that 
when such subscriptions are made, the interest which the counties 
and cities hold, should be surrounded by safeguards of the most un- 
questionable security. From this consideration alone, it is submit* 
ted that it would be improper to invest the directory of any compa- 
ny with unlimited power to sell bonds at any rate of discount they may 
please to make, and to cause them to bear any rate of interest how- 
ever exorbitant. Is it not the duty of the law making power lo 
protect the tax payers of the subscribing counties from encroach- 



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188 

menty especially when the irrevocable character of such bpiids b 
considered 7 

But this objection to the unlimited* rate o( interest and discount, 
is greatly strengthened by a consideration of the vast number of en- 
terprises of this character in this and the adjoining States » and the 
probable effect of their prosecution upon our financial condition. 
Facts of recent occurrence are full of instruction on this subject. 
The lesson that a similar state of things taught the people of the old 
world, I trust are not forgotten. There these enterprises have already 
received a severe check, and it would seem that the spirit of specula- 
tion has been transferred from that field of operation, in a great meas- 
ure to this country. Here, similar scenes are now being enacted, 
not to the same extent, it may be, but unless a prudent foresight in- 
terpose its salutary check, there is ground for the apprehension that 
results equally disastrous will here ensue. We are advised that one 
of the first moneyed houses of the old Mforld has lately established a 
branch in our great commercial metropolis, thus preparing for ao 

. tioo, regarding this as the peculiar field for such operation; and from 
the very fact that it becomes necessary now, in view of the interests 
of certain companies in the prosecution of these works, to ask leave 
to pay a higher rate of interest than usual, and to sell their bonds at 
whntever amount they may agree to receive is evidence of a strong 
pressure, or otherwise of an over action in this branch of enterprise. 
Indiana has had such a lesson on the subject of the prosecution of 
works of a similar character, that we shall be justly chargeable with 
a want of prudence, if we fall again into a like diflSculty, without 
having made some exertion to avoid the disaster. If the moneyed 
operations of these companies are confined to the ordinary and safe 
methods of conducting business; if large debts are not contracted, at 
heavy rates of interest, or at a ruinous discount, then in case of a 
general pressure, the worst that could happen would be a suspension 
of the work. 

But consider what would be the effect, if by a general monetary 
revulsion, such a work should be arrested, while in the midst of its 

. active operations, if burthened with the obligation to pay heavy rates 
of interest, and at the same time, with no part of the work so far 
finished, as to be susceptible of producing revenue. Extend this ex- 
ample over the whole State, and what would we see, but the mate- 
rials of these works brought under the hammer, the bonds pledged 
to them disposed of at forced sales, to the consternation of the too 
confiding occupants, and the tax payers of a subscribing county, 
groaning under a burdensome imposition for the purpose of paying 
the interest on a stock which pays no dividends. It is said, if a 
limit is prescribed as to the sale of these bonds, or the interest that 
they shall bear, that no sale can be made at any better rates or lim- 
its. This is not true. It was not so in the sale of the State bonds, 
during the progress of our system of internal improvements. There 
was invariably a limit prescribed^ as to the interest the bonds should 



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18» 

bear, and according to the reports of the Fund CommimoDers, gales 
were made for less than the rates prescribedf and in many instances 
a premium. But \rith all the restrictions that could be thrown 
around the sale of our bonds, the State suffered greatly, and she will 
not soon again lend her credit, or become interested in any works of 
internal improvement. 

We are now in the midst of the second history of internal im- 
provements in Indiana, in which are involved a large amount of 
Corporation stock of Counties and Cities. 

It is a matter of but little difference, whether the State, Counties, 
or individuals, are carrying on an enterprise, if the same fails or 
turns out badly* it will equally affect the whole community. 

All are alike interested in the welfare and prosperity of the State; 
the adoption of a principle that is liable to be abused, and will work 
to the injury of the one, will inevitably affect the other. 

We have more than a million of County and City stock, in the 
various Railroads of the State, and the prospect is, that the amount 
\vill be lai^ely increased the coming season. 

Whenever it shall become necessary, to carry on these works, 
thai you have to place the credit of the Companies in the hands of 
the money lenders, and the individual intrusted with the work, with- 
out limit or restriction, that moment you will prostrate the credit of 
the country. What will be the character of our State abroad when 
Counties and Cities shall be driven in effect, to repudiate their obli- 
gations and contracts? 

When this takes place, you will find the dues of the State placed 
in the same situation. 

When a rate of interest is established by law, and when as with 
us, the rate is high compared with commercial rates it is policy not 
to permit exceptions to the rules except in extreme cases, and then 
there should be a limit. 

In the case under consideration, it seems to me, that public policy 
points plainly to the enforcement of the rule within a given limit« 
It might be safe, and even desirable, to permit the sale of bonds, at . 
somewhat less than the par of State Bonds, of the same rate of inter- 
est, but the experience of the State admonishes us that the discretion 
in such cases should have its limits defined. 

It is a remarkable fact, that in every instance that has come under 
my observation, where the power is sought to be given to the direct- 
ors of companies to borrow money, or make sales of Bonds, without 
limit or restriction, that in the first instance, acts of Incorporation 
have been passed by the Legislature, in which no such power is giv- 
en, and that Counties ingoc^ faith have taken stock in said compan- 
ies; that subsequently amendments have been made from time to 
time, until now this unlimited power is asked. It is suggested with 
great deference, whether the adding of this power, would not be a 
violation of the faith upon which the people of the several counties, 
in their corporate name, have heretofore taken stock in the various 
companies of the State. 



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190 

It is said that the bill referred to does not authorize the selling of 
the bonds of the counties, or the hypothecating of them at any rate 
of interest, that may be agreed upon. While this is, perhaps true, 
it is difficult for me to perceive the difference between giving the 
power expressly, in relation to the bonds of the Counties, or making 
the same unlimited power, applicable alone to the stock of the com- 
pany, or bonds of the Counties ; or making the same unlimited 
power, applicable alone to the stock of the Company, or theborrow- 
inff of money. If you affect the stock by exorbitant interest, or 
sell the bonds of the company at a ruinous sacrifice, it must affect 
the County stock, as well as that of the citizen. All are connected 
together for the welfare of the work, and the adoption of a princi- 
ple that is calculated to injure the one, will injure the others. The 
objection to this want of limit, in the rate of interest to be paid for 
money borrowed, and in the sale of stocks, is, that it gives a power 
which is liable to great abuse, and may involve the most ruinous 
consequences. And I cannot but think that the Legislature in con- 
ferring such a power, have failed to consider with the requisite matu- 
rity, all the abuses to which it is liable. We know not who are to 
hold the places of Directors of these Corporations, with the right 
thus to offer in market the stock of the Companies, and to borrow 
money. Prudence requires that we should guard against every pos- 
aible state of things that may arise. 

The internal improvement system was undertaken, with the too 
confident expectation that the works to be constructed, when finish- 
ed, would be productive and yield ample revenue to pay the interest 
on the debt incurred in their construction. That it would impose 
no burden of taxation ; on the contrary the system would confer 
great benefits upon the State and relieve the people from the pressure 
of existing burdens. With such expectations the obligations of the 
State were issued and scattered broad cast in the market. Our ex- 
perience of the disastrous consequences, is too recent and costly to 
be forgotten. After the suspension of our public works in 1840, and 
when the delusion had been dispelled by the unmistakeable fact, that 
there was no way to resuscitate the credit and vindicate the faith of 
the State, than by a resort to taxation. It was then that the mode 
in which the obligations of the State had been sold was scrutinized, 
and there was no sentiment more common than this, that we should 
not pay anything on our bonds, for which we had not received the 
money; and that we should only pay on the bonds sold, the amount 
of which had been received. The transition from this sentiment is 
rapid, to the following langui^e in the bill before us, **all sales at a 
discount, the same shall remain as valid and binding, in every respect, 
as if sold at par value.'* 

It is proper, it seems to me, that we bring the question to this test, 
and to assume that the people of the counties may be called upon to 
provide for the payment of both principal and interest of their bonds 
bv taxation. 



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191 

From the excitement on the subject of Rail Roads, and the unlim- 
ited power that is now sought, by the Companies of the State, it 
would appear that private credit is almost exhausted ; and it is now 
asked to exhaust public credit as far as possible, by offering in our 
public and deliberate acts of legislation, to pay any rate of interest 
however large, and to sell in market our credit, for any price to raise 
money. 

Whatever difference of opinion may exist as to limiting the rate 
of discount on bonds, sold in the market, it seems to me, that there 
should be but one sentiment, in regard to the limitation of the rate 
of interest. ' 

Is it not possible that, in the over anxiety to secure the means for 
the construction of a favorite work, the directors or agent, might be 
induced to agree to such a rate of interest, as, not only to be suici- 
dal to the work itself but by the destruction of public credit, to in- 
volve all others in its ruins? 

It is confidently believed, that no such policy has been projected 
or fostered in any State of the Union. And I trust Indiana will not 
be the first to set the example. 

In addition to the above considerations, I. cannot but regard the 
passage of a bill involving such important principles, on Uie same 
day of its introduction, by repeated suspensions of the rules, and 
without reference to a committee as an instance of hasty legislation, 
which alone would justify executive interference. 

JOSEPH A- WRIGHT. 

January 8th, 1851. 



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Doc. No. 8.] [Part. I . 

REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT 



OF THE 



NEW ALBANY & VINGENNES ROAD 



TO THB 



AUDITOR OF STATE. 



DECEMBER, 1850. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 
S. T. OBAPMAII, aTATB rRIRTIK. 

1851. 
1D91 



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REPORT. 



T^the Awdiiorof SMei 

SkE: — Id conpliaocd with Um LiW under iK^ch 1 ain af 
I htvDwith tniiwaiit a Report of my procMdingB as Superiatandnu 
of tiia New Albaoy and VineeiBnet Road from the 37th of February » 
1860t to the Slit October, I860, conieiaiaff an aceount of all meMfi 
notived aad expended by me upon said ftoadt to*wit: 

185a /oe/ Vmndew9r in mooomt wUh the SUM of MimM. Ar. 

To amoont received of Michael Riley former Super- 
intendent, * $S;2TT 70 

To tolls received as per receipts from No. 1 to No. 
50 inclasiYe, 4,684 50 

Total Receipts, t6,Md 90 



KxpendHnreB. 

By amount expended as follows as per receipts No. I to No. 194 
inclusive: 

Cr. 

On account of Constmction, f8,7M 19 

On account of Repairs, 3,404 72 

On account of Contingencies, 6C3 80 

On account of Damages, • 1 00 

$9,059 71 
Leaving balance on hand Nov. 1, 1850 $90S 49 



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196 

The amount included under the head of construction is principally 
for the redemption of Scrip, and for the payment of a debt due the 
New Albany Branch. The contingencies are chiefly for salaries of 
gate-keeper, books, stationery, quarrying tools, blasting and powder, 
full details of which have been forwarded to your oflice. One reason 
why the contingent expenses are so laige is that when I entered upon 
nw official duty as Superintendent of said road, I found it destitute 
of tools necessary for repairing the same, I would also state, when 
I entered upon my official duty, I found the road East of Blue river 
in bad condition for travel, owing principally to the want of sufficient 
funds to keep the same in repair through the winter, in conseqoenc^e 
of which, it.was a difficult task to exact and collect the toll from the 
traveling community. I feel safe in saying that owing to the bad 
condition of the road has been the means of loss to the State — when 
1 recollect that there is owing to the State from J. N. Easdiam pro- 
prietor of the stage line. Whilst Mr. Riley was Superintendent 
tiwithajfn got in arrearages to the amount of $439 16, ako behind 
vaith me for Mardi last, $9S 40, making the sum of $5317 56, whfch 
lie refuses to pay. Prom thence until now I have succeeded in col- 
ieoliag^said toll* W hat course he will hereafter pursue I am unable to 
tell, but can assure you that all lawful means will be used to enforce 
the payment of toll until my term of service expires. I have used 
my nest endeavors both east and west of Paoli in applying the mo- 
ney appropriated for the repairing of the same — the road west of 
FaoU is, now in good order for the reception of travel, the bridges 
having all been repaired in worknian-like manner. One of the toll 
bridges is completed and the building committee is collecting toll by 
the same ; the other bridge is under contract and part of the mate- 
rials paid for. In r^rd to the eastern or metalled part, through the 
diliigence and perseverance of industrious men under my supervision, 
has been put in sood order for the reception of the . traveling com- 
munity* and willremain so unless there should be an uncommon 
amount of rain. The travel upon the road has increased as the 
amount of toll will show, and it is bound to increase or diminish 
acoording to the condition of the road. Although the road is at this 
time in a condition agreeable for the traveling community, yet I 
most say that the amount of money appropriated for the repairing of 
the same, is not sufficient to keep the same in sood order through 
the winter season, and it is my humble opinion, tnat unless our L^- 
istature wish to see the road go down and become a useless waste 
of money, the amount of repairing the same should be increased for 
some years to come. The bank debt in the New Albany Branch 
has been considerably reduced, and I expect to pay the Imlance to 
said bank on or before the first day of January next Should our 
Legislature in their wisdom be so covetous as to apply the proceeds 
of the road to the reparation of the same for a few years, (which I 
think would not injure scrip holders as they or most of them have 
purchased it greatly below par, and it is drawing six per cent, per 



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BnuiD,) but be the iMUfl of iacTMsifig he IniTd, conMaoMlly the 
rib, aod tberaby accimttlate nMans for the redemption of the same, 
ihall now briitt my oommmicettoo to a doie wer lejriiig to you 
kat you heTe, wben yoo raoeiTe this my ebetractt and Touchen ap 
»theS8th of November, 1850, all of wbiGh I have cheerfull? trawh 
littad to your honor— all of which I hope are oonect^if they are 
ot and the error is in my fiiTor, I am willing to correct the same« if 
niost me, I ask the same lenity as I am a poor man and wkdi to 
Main a living by honest means, only with due respect for the Hon. 
5.W.H.EIIis, 

I subscribe myself your obedient servant, 

JOEL VaNDEVEER, Superintendeni. 
Orncx 9r SvPBMirreiinorT, Nov. 8, 1850. 



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Doc. No. 9 .] [Part. I. 

REPORT 



COMMITTEE TO ENQUIRE INTO THE EXPEDIENCY OF MAKING AN 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE EXPENSES ' 



CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION. 



JAN.UART 1», 18»1. 



INDIAVAPOLIS: 
J. Pi OHAPM AM, STATB PBIHTIB. 

um 



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REPORT. 



Mi 

The Select Committee, to whom was referred a resolution of 
the House, directing them to enquire into the expediency of making 
an appropriation for the payment of the expenses of the Convention 
DOW in session for the purpose of revising and amending the Con- 
stitution of this State, and to report the probable amount necessary 
to enable said Convention to complete the object for which it was 
assembled, have had the subject under consideration, and directed 
me to report: 

That the Convention was called into existence by the qualified vo- 
ters of this State, with the view to correct certain acknowledged de* 
facts in the existing Constitution, and to deliberate of the propriety 
of the reforms su^ested, about which a diversity of opinion pre- 
vailed. 

Among the amendments about which there was little, if any, dif- 
ference of opinion, the following are believed to be the principal: 

1st. The election by the people, of all Judges, and of those chief 
officers of State now elected by the Legistature. 

2d. Biennial sessions of the General Assembly. 

3d. The appropriation of all fines and forfeitures to the support 
of Common Schools. 

4th. Limitation of the legislative power in the creation of a 
public debt. 

5th. Suitable restrictions against the passage of laws of a local 
character. 

6th. A re-construction of our Judiciary establishment, and some 
provisions for the simplifying of our laws, and the mode of procedure 
in our Courts. 

Other amendments were advocated in some quarters, such as a 
modification of our Grand Jury system ; to prevent the immigration 



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204 

to the State of free blacks ; to open to competition the business of 
banking. But it is believed the foregoing embraces the principal, if 
not all the subjects, in reference to which, amendments, revision and 
reform, in the existing Constitution, were demanded. 

In the canvass of 1849, immediately preceding the time when the 
people were called upon to vote whether or not a Convention should 
oe called, the reforms desired were extensively discussed from the 
candidates for Governor down, and the committee feel a very confi- 
dent assurance that none others beyond those above specified, were 
submitted to the people. It was in reference to these reforms and 
some others, that the people voted for the call of a Convention. The 
Committee dare not say, that the Convention is strictly limited to the 
consideration of these reforms and none other. Yet, doubtless it 
should be an argument of ^reat weight to that body, that the people 
had neither felt nor fancied any evils in the present system, beyond 
those above indicated, until the Convention in its spirit of demolition, 
had demonstrated its sense of the rickety structure under which this 
people had lived insecurely so long. 

The act providing for the call of the Convention, approved Jan- 
uary 18, lo50, does not in direct terms limit the session of that body. 
Yet in the opinion of the committee the inference is strong, and the 
arguments abundant, that the Legislature which passed the act, never 
contemplated a session beyond three months. The provisions in the 
act appropriating $40,000 for the payment of the expenses of the 
Convention, postponing the usual period of the meeting of the Gen- 
eral Assembly to the 5th Monday in December, and requiring the 
Governor to lay before that body at its present session, a certified 
copy of the amended Constitution, all establish beyond a donbt the 
purpose of the Legislature to limit the action of the Convention 
within the period of three months. 

The committee are of opinion, that a strict economy of time would 
have enabled the Convention to have fully and satisfactorily fulfilled 
ita trust and to have made all needful amendments to the Constitution 
within that period. While thej^ would not disparage the value of 
the labors of that body, nor impugn the motives of any of its 
members, much less make any invidious references, they desire to 
express in distinct terms their opinion, that much time has been use- 
lessly consumed in the consideration of reforms- neither called for 
nor desirable. 

In the opinion of this committee the organic law of the State 
should be simple in structure* brief and perspicuous. These qualities 
are important to secure its being read and comprehended by the ipeo^ 
pie of all classes and conditions, now and hereafter. It should be a 
vademecum in the hands of every citizen, as familiar to him as his 



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905 

Bible. The distribution of the powers of government, and the pre- 
cise UmHation of each department, with a specific enumeration of 
those^rights excepted out of the powers of government* and imiola^ 
Ue under all circumstances, are susceptible of being reduced within 
a very brief compass, scarcely as long tm the charter of a moddm 
ndlroad company. The best evidence of this truth is found in that 
beautiful model* wortiiy of all imitation, the Constitution of the 
United States, and in that excellent Constitution now in process of 
amendment. Under this latter instrument* we have flourished as a 
State, beyond all former precedent. From a population of 60*000 
sottlsf we have increased to one of a million, and in the third part of 
a century have risen to the dignity of the fifth State in this great 
Confederacy. That Constitution was framed by our fathers, in the 
period of twetUy-ime days. A Convention of their sons has been oc- 
cupied near four months with its revision, and yet gives no indica- 
tion of an early adjournment. 

The Committee do not wish to disguise the fact* that the people 
are rsstless and dissatisfied with this state of things. Their mur- 
mon are becoming deep and loud. By the Ist of February, the ear- 
liest period at which the Convention will probably adjourn, its ex- 
penses will amount to very near the sum of $80,000; a sum adequate 
to defray the whole ordinary expenses of the State Government for 
a year. At a period when our people are staggering under the bur- 
den of the State debt ; when many counties have become deeply in- 
volved, in the erection of public buildings, and in subscriptions to 
railroad enterprises; when our taxation has been pressed seemingly 
to the furthest endurable point, it is with deep reluctance the Com- 
mittee feel constrained to recommend a further appropriation of 
137311* involving still further taxation. This appropriation b de- 
signed to cover all the expenses of the Convention, not met by the 
appropriation of last year, up to the 1st day of February next. 
The Committee feel that they would outrage public opinion* were 
they to recommend an appropriation that would allow the Conven- 
tion to continue its session one day beyond the period above named* 
at the expense of the State. Should the members of that body not 
be able to complete their work by that time, it is not doubted a sense 
of patriotism will induce them to cheerfully devote the remaining 
time required without charge. 

The Committee submit die following estimates of expenses up to 
the 1st day of February dext : 



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906 

Per diem pay of the memben $54,450 

Mileage of members, 3,750 

Expenses of Clerks, . -..-•.. StJBSi 

Ex penses of Door-keepers, Sergeant-at-arms, and Woodman, 3,239 

Stationery and fuel, 1,630 

Expense of Stenographer to report the debates of the Con- 
vention, 5^243 

Expenses of room, and rent of Masonic Hall, ■ . 520 

Expenses of printing, 5,600 

♦77,311 

SAMUEL A. MOORE. Ch'n, 
WILLIAM M. FRANKLIN, 
L HUTCHINSON, 

JAS. s. McClelland, 

GEO. W. BROWN, 
D. D. PRATT, 
WM. WATT, 
O. BIRD, 

LUTHER SHOOK, 
D. E. WILLIAMSON. 



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Poc. No. 10.] [Parti. 

REPORT 



VISITER TO THE STATE PRISON, 



GOVERNOR OF INDIANA. 



JAN.UART IS, IISI. 



INOIANAPOLISt 
J< Pi OBAPHAH, ITATB PBIIITBR. 

1861. 
IDSS 



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REPORT. 



Totke Htm. J&teph A. Wright, €hvemor of Indiana: 

Dbae Sir — Having made, by your appointment, and accord* 
ing to law, two Tisits, one in Aprils and the other in December, to 
the Indiana Penitentiary, I proceed to communicate to you such facta 
and sonestions as appear to me of interest. 

The Prison buildings arejn good repair, and are kept as neat and 
comely as the circumstances of the place, and the purposes for which 
they are used, would seem to admit. The grounds about the Prison, 
the street in front and the gardens and yards of the Warden and 
Leasee, are improving by the tasteful planting of shade trees and 
shrabbery. 

The Prison yard greatly needs improvement. It is necessarily 
nsed constantly, trampled over by men, and cut up by the wheels of 
vehicles. It must, therefore, especially in winter and In rainy sea- 
sons, become desperately muddy. The^whole yard should be McAd* 
amized. It was supposed that the refuse of Uie brick-yard might 
answer instead of rock, for rendering the surface of the Prison-yard 
solid ; but experience proves that nothing less substantial than bro- 
ken lime stone will answer any valuable purpose. It is decidediv 
advised to have the whole, or nearly the whole yard covered witn 
broken rock, sufficiently deep to afford a dry, firm surface. 

A sewer, leading from the Prison to the river, is urgently demand* 
ed. The means by which the excrement and filth are now removed, 
are shocking to all the senses of humanity. The sewer should be 
constructed, if possible, before the heat of summer returns. Health 
about the prison is entirely out of the question in warm weather, 
while such a state of things, as must exist, with no better means than 
are now available for renK>ving the large amount of excrementitious 
matter, collecting about such an establishment, remains. The inter- 
nal condition of the work-shops, and cell-house, is, in geneal, good. 
Several openings have been made during the last season, in^the roof 
of the cell-house^ to permit the escape of vitiated air. By this means 
the ventilation of the building is greatly improved. 



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212 

In paning through the workshops, and carerully noting the nooiber 
and apparent character of the prisoners, one is surprised at the very 
small number of convicts in proportion to the population of the 
State. With a population of 988,000, we have less than 150 in the 
Penitentiary. In looking over the Prison Register for the last fifteen 
years, I find that the whole number of convicts entered in that time, 
is less than 600. 

On observing the prisimers individually, we fail to recognize indi- 
cations, except in fewinstaacef,|)f old mi hardened criminals. Moat 
of the convicts are of youthful appearance. Many of them would 
be taken for persons of harmless character. Many (rf* them com- 
mitted the crime for which they are imprisoned, in a fit of passion f 
others under the influence of drunkenness. Some have neither mor- 
al force to keep out of a bad scrape, nor cunning to escape detection^ 
There are, however, among them, some fzpart and a<?ecwpUflhetf 
roffues, who never should be trusted at large, m society. 

The small number of prisoners, and the abeenoer in tliem^rity of 
Indication? of ynusual depravity, would lead us to ip&r that the peo* 
pl9 of Indiana are very moral, or that our laws are very lenient, or 
that most of the expert, accomplished, and talented rogues have e^* 
Mped detection. 

There appears a strange inequality in the terms of imprisomaeal 
Qf different individuals for the sameofience. Some persons are sent 
for t^o, some for five, some for seven, and some for fourteen yeartt 
for the very same crime, differing in no material circumstance. If 
this inequality be the fault of the law, the law should surely beamend- 
oi. If it be the fault of Judges and Jurors, the pardoning power 
should be Interposed. There is one man now serving his tentn year 
for stealing a horse. Several others, for the same ofienee, under more 
aggravating circumstances, are sent for only two yearei. There is 
surely something wrong in this. 

The discipline of the Prison, particularly under the administration 
of the gentleman now acting as Warden, is efiicient, and as mild aa 
the nature of the case will admit. Corporeal punishment has been 
but seldom inflicted. Some kind of punishment is in some cases, in- 
dispensable. The prisoners themselves all acknowledge this fact. 
But it is. doubted whether flogging be the better mode or punishment. 
]Por my own part^ I wholly disapprove of flogging human beings. 1 
Relieve it not only unnecessary, but intrinsically and essentially in- 
juripus. I would not resort to this mode of punishment, either in 
families, or schools, or on ship-board, or in prisons. It b degrading 
equally to him who suffers, and him who inflicts it. In the sufierer it 
destroys self-respect, and begets revenge. In him who uses the rod 
or the lash, it blunts the sensibilities, and brutalizes the mind. If 
^e system were a good one, it is in a Penitentiary liable to gi*eat 
aldose. Under the gentlemanly and amiable men, the Warden and 
the li^ee, now in charge of the Indiana Penitentiary, there is little, 
if any danger of abuse. Yet under other men, of less kindness of 



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8I« 

Mrt, or )$m •flqiiamtano with humtn nature^ grial ■buiat mUkk 
ccun Prisoaora ftre fomatimes flomd oa the oomplaiat of <Hoor 
onviotflt and more often on the com^int of oveiveen in the work 
bopsp who are not in all caaee exempt from the tyranny of brief 
.utboritv» and the prejudice of bitted and pais i o n ate temper* 

I yerily believe, and in this opinion I am confirmed by the teetimo* 
ly of Superintendents and oveneers of Priioafy that other modes of 
(unishmentf less objectionable, and more effectual, may be substituted 
or fledging. At any rate, the man who cannot govern children, or 
cholars* or sailors, or prisoners, without flowing ihem, oqght never 
o assume the control of human beings. 

Convicts frequently brinff with them to the prisooi small eume of 
noney. Small sums are luso occasionally furnished them by their 
riends, or earned by extra labor. According to the rtiles of the 
Prison, whatever money the convicts may have, or may receive, 
nost be deposited with the Warden. These funds serve to procure 
or the convict a little sqgar, or coffee, or some other luxury in sick* 
less, and to furnish him some means of support, when, on the expira^ 
ion of his term, he is turned again on the world. To secure the 
-elunding of such money, the Warden should be required to give 
)ond. By the sudden death of the late Warden, several hundred 
lollars, belonging to the convicts, are, it is feared, lost They were 
'equired to place their little pittance in his hands, and it is gone. 
Should not the State refund to those poor creatures the small some 
hus lost, by the insolvency of their agent's estate? There are some 
ndividual cases of extreme hardsliip in this matter. At any raieb 
provision should be made by law, that no case of the kind should 
lereafter occur. 

When the convict's term expires, usage or law provides for him to 
receive three dollars in cash. This sum is wholly inadequate. If the 
convict has been long in prison, the clothes which he wore to the 
[Penitentiary will have become, through moth and other causes, whot 
y unfit for service. He roust have a suit of new clothes, and some 
neans of paying his expenses to some pkce of abode. But what 
!an he do with three dollars 7 How far will that go towards purohaa- 
ng an outfit of clothing, and paying his expenses to his home T If 
le has no friends near to help him, and no money i^.the hands of the 
(Varden, be has no recourse but to steal. The State should provide 
or a decent suit of clothes, and money sufficient to pay the expenses 
if the liberated convict to his home. Unless this be done» it might 
M as well to keep him in prison, and thereby save the trouble and 
xxpense of sending him back for stealing to supply the exigencies of 
lature. 

It might not be proper for me to make any sumgpsstiow in relation 
o the exercise of the pardoning power. I will, nowever, make one. 
There are cases in which the pardoning power should be exercised, 
)ut which are not likely to come to the notice of the Executive— ^m 
}f men without friendst strangers among us — men who, in a drunken 



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914 

tpree, committed tstalts, or' stole a horse, or pissed a five doDtr 
counterfeit bill, wliich probably some greater TiUain had just f^aaiod 
pa them. They are prosecated, tad sent to prison for the first of- 
fence, perhaps for fourteen years. They have no influential friendi 
to help them, or perhaps they become in. their sober moments so cha- 
grinea at their disgrace, that they, like some now in our Penitentia- 
ry, resolve to die there, rather than ever have their family or friends 
know where they are. Such cases I would particularly commend to 
Executive favor. Reliance on the representation of a convict miffht 
lead the Executive into error. A careful obsei*ver, however, of no- 
man nature, would be less likely to be deceived by a persona! inter- 
View with a convict, than by the representation of other persons. 
He who possesses the pardoning power must not expect to escape 
blame, whether he does, or does not exercise it. He will be most 
likely not to err, when he takes the responsibility of acting solely oq 
his own suggestions of right. So far as I have been able to ascertain 
facts, the pardoning power, under your administration, has never 
been exercised injudiciously, and it is my decided conviction that it 
should have been applied in other cases. 

It appears from examining the Prison Register, that of all who 
enter the Penitentiary, at least one in six die there. This appears 
too great a mortality. I know not the cause. If the blame be in 
the natnre and circumstances of prison discipline, that discipline 
should be modified. If there be any thing in the local position, or 
circumstances of the Indiana Penitentiary, producing disease and 
death, the cause should be investigated. 

' One of the most interesting facts, which even the transient visiter 
will notice, b the interest the prisoners take in .the Library, ipvhich 
you took' the responsibility of procuring for them. Whenever his 
task for the day is done, the poor convict takes his book from his 
pocket, and b^ins to read. Provision should be made to furnish a 
a small lamp at the door of each cell, that the inmate may be able to 
read during the long winter evenings. The lamps hanging in the 
hall are wholly insufficient to furnish light to read in the cells. The 
ftimishing, however, of the small lamps for each cell, and the keep- 
ing of them in order, would involve additional expense, which the 
Lessee should ndt sustain without compensation. 

Great good would result from a small annual appropriation for 
increasing the library. The State would act not only benevolently, 
but wisely, in making such appropriation. 

A few newspapers might be of great service. I know not why a 
prisoner should be kept wholly ignorant of what is going on outside 
of his dungeon walls. If we ever expect to make a good citizen of 
him, we should furnish him some means of keeping up his intelligence 
of the progress of society. 

I concur in your views in relation to transferring the duties of Su- 
perintendent of buildings to the Warden, and also in relation to ap- 
pointment of Physician. It is however, to be observed that a 



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315 

« 

dtfUBgtm Um mpdb of appointiDg the Phytidaa might naturally » and 
v«nr raatttriaUy aftet the interest of the Lessee. If, therrfore, tihe 
pabtic good require the chai^, it may be right to make some adjust* 
ment of terms between the State and the LMsee. 

The last season has been one of peculiar hardship to the Leswe. 
The cholera prevailed most disastrously among the prisonen. A 
brae number died, and all, with two or three exceptions, were sick, 
end for a long time business in the establishment was nearly suspend- 
ed. The expense of providing for the sick was great, and the loss, 
in beinp anaDle,from the prevailing sickness, to carry on busuMss to 
meet his contracts, was very severe on the L e ssee , It is suggested 
whether the State should not modify, in some deoree, the contract 
with him, so as to be able to accomplish its benevdent purposes, and 
yet secure him from loss. 

As the contract between the State and the Lessee has some yean 
yet longer to run, it woukl not be deemed timely now to discuss the 
policy of leasing the Prison. There areevils essential to such a sys- 
tem as the State has adopted in this matter. These evils, however, 
are not Ukdy to be developed under the administration of such men, 
as nowfillthe office of Wardenand Lesese. Men bettor adapted to 
te place might not be easily found. But yet it is doubtful whether 
the leasmg system be wholly consistent with the dignity, and the hu- 
manity, of the populous, wealthy and noble State of Indiana. 8omm 
other time, however, rather than the present, would be appropriate 
forassigning reasons for this opinion. At present we have only to 
tike the system as it is, and make the best of it. 
Yours, Respectfully : 

W. C. LAKRABEB. 

JAmaBT 1, 18BL 



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Doc. No. 11.] [ Part I. 

MESSAGE 



OP 



GOVERNOR WRIGHT, 



UTURlflNO TO TH£ 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



WITH HIS oBJBonom, 



BILL, NO. 366. 



PASSED AT THE LAST SESSION. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 
J. f. OHAPMAM, 8TAT1 PBINTBB. 

18S1. 
1D84 



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MESSAGE. 



To tke House cf RepresentaiiveSt of the General Assemtiy of the 
ItaUof bdidna: 

Gentlemen^-^Tbe accomplmjriAg billt No. S66» Ad act to amaod 
in act entitled ''an aet supplamefitary to an act to provide for tba 
'Yinded Debt of the State of Indiana, and for the completion of tha 
Wabash and Erie Canal to Evansville, approved January 19, 1846^ 
ipproved January 27| 1847,^ was paned at the laat session of the 
leneral Assembly, but not having been presented to me until withia 
ive days, (indeed within less than two days) of the final adjournment 
*f that session, and the intermediate time not being sufficient for 
uch a consideration of the bill, as some erf* its provisions seemed 
learly to demand, it was held over, as authorised by the Constitution 
nd it is now respectfully returned to the House in which it <nriffhiaW 
d, with the objections which have Constrained me to withhokl my. 
pproval of the same. 

This bill purports to be an ^ An act to amend an act entitled an 
ct mpplementary to an act to provide for the Funded Debt of the 
»tate of Indiana, and for the completion of the Wabash and Erie 
)anal to Evansville, approved January 19, 1846, approved January 
ff, 1847," — in an important particular. 

To carry into effect the important and vital objects of the Public 
)ebt Act, a trust was created for the two fold purpose of providing 
»r the payment of one half of the public indebtedness of the State, 
nd securing the completion of the Wabash and Erie Canal to the 
>hio river — both objects of vital importance to the prosperity and 
oner of Indiana. 

In order to establish and secure the confklence.of bondholders in 
ie security thus provided, and induce them to accept the provisions 
r the act of 1847, it is, among other things, expressly declared, in 
iction 14 of said act, as follows : 

** Now to demonstrate the good faith of the State of Indiana, and 
for the removal of all such doubts as aforesaid, and unih a niew to 
create general confidence in the arrangement made in the said recit- 
ed act by the State far the liquidation of its debt: 
**Btit enatedf That the tolls, revenues, and profits of the said ca- 
nal, and its appurtenances present and future, and the moneys to 
arise and be collected by and from the sales of the lands and prem- 



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** ises contiffuous thereto, and in the laid act mora particularly men- 
** tioned and describ/Bd, and the personal taxes to be levied towards 
** the payment of the said debt, as in the said act also recited, and 
** the receipts and application thereof for that purpose, as in the same 
** act is also provided, shall remain and be inviolatb and in full force; 
** and the payment of the principal moneys and interest on the 
•« certificates and stock intended to be created pursuant to the said 
** act, and this act, and all the certificates and evidences of the title 
** thereof respectively, shall be and continue effectual and inviolats 
** by the means aforesaid, until the objects and purposes of the said 
** act, and this present act, shall be fully accomplished." 

And for the reasons and with the view to induce such confidence 
as aforesaid : 

, **Beit further enacted^ That all stock, to be created, and all cer- 

''tificates and other instruments of title to be issued in pursuance of 

the said act, and all principal moneys and interest thereby respective- 

**ly secured, shall not be moksted or impaired, arrested or attached, 

• «« by the State of Indiana.'' 

In the 32d section of the act referred to, it is declared : — ** The 
** debt which it is the object of the trust created by the said recited 
^act,(as amended by this act) to liquidate, as in thesaid acts is mention- 
*' ed, having been contracted under the authority of the State of In- 
^diana, and for the services of the people of the State, and it be'mg 
« desirable, as well for the credit of the State, as also^ in aider to ef- 
** tablish confidence in the public in general, and the subscribers in 
^particular, to secure the utmost punctuality, in the fulfilment of the 
" objects of the said Trust, it is hereby declared, that the tolls and 
** revenues of the said canal, present and future, and the lands and 
** lots so conveyed, as hereinbefore mentioned, and the proceeds there- 
^ of, when sold, shall be, and the same are hereby specially pigged, 
^ to form a distinct and particular fund for the redemption of the 
^* stock and certificates to be issued in pursuance of the said recited 
*' act, and of this act ; and the said State shall rot jmuubct or pBa- 
** MIT any appropriation to be made of such tolls and revenues, lands 
** and proceeds, or any of them, for the general purposes of the State. 
**ov otherwise howsosvxr, other than and except for the purposes of 
" the said Trust, as directed by the said act." 

It would be diflicult to use any language so little liable to miscon- 
ception, as that employed above. Apart from the nature of the ar- 
rangement with our creditors, which is in the form of a compact, 
the two acts of January, 1846, and January, 1847, are their own ia- 
torpreters. The Legislature reserved to itself no power or right to 
alter, repeal or amend them, or any part of them. A proposiuon to 
retain this right was voted down by a decided majority of the Lag* 
islature, as the record of their proceedings shows; for the reason, 
unquestionably, that any such reserved power would prevent the ac- 
ceptance of the act by the Bondholders, and defeat the very object 
the Legislature had in view. 



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The mctB rafemd to were in the form and titirit of a cmiUmet» in 
winch the creditors of the State divided their claim between the State 
heiBolf and certain securiiies which she tendered. These secnritiee 
woro taken by the Bondholders for fully one half of the State's in« 
debtednessy under certain guaranties, some of which I have recited. 
Perhaps no measure was ever more full v discussed before the people 
of Indiana ; and the Legislature of 1846-47 embodied in the act of 
that session the strongest pledges and covenants, as we have seen, 
against any such interference, at any time thereafter, ** with a view** 
(as expressly stated*) "to create general confidence in the arrange- 
-^ ment madb in the said recited act, by the State, for the liquidation of 
"its debt.** 

If the Legislature can pass any law for the amendment of the acts 
proriding for the Funded Debt in the manner provided in the bill 
herewith returned, they can in any other respect, and thtis the bust* 
ness and property of the Trust would only find defence in the co- 
ordinate brainches of the State Government. 

That the bill herewith returned conflicts with the guaranties and 
pledges of the acts of 1846 and 1847, is obvious on the face of It ; 
lor it expressly directs the Trustees to do certain things, and inhibits 
them from collecting a portion of the debts due to the Trust, the col- 
lection of which b indispensable to enable them to meet thpir pay* 
meats for canal work, and finish the canal according to the terms of 
the act. These Trustees, it should be remembered, are charged with 
the completion of the canal to Evansville, and have been, for more 
than three years, energetically applying all the means at their dispo- 
sal to that object. These means, (after expending the $800,000 ad- 
vanced bv the Bondholders,) are derived principally from the sales 
of canal lands. They have entered into large contracts for the com- 
pletion of the entire line, requiring payments to be made in cash as 
the work progresses. To prevent the collection of their debts would 
be unjust; to do it in the mode proposed, would be illegal, in my 
opinion, and justly bring upon the Legislature a charge of bad faith. 
While the Trustees are carrying out the law confided to their execu- 
tion, and exerting every efibrt to complete the work to Evansville, 
the Legislature cannot be too cautious in the passage of bills of the 
character of the one now under consideration. Above all thinp^s, 
the General Assembly should see that none are entertained which 
come in direct conflict with the law itself. 

If the Trustees fail to execute their duties under the act, the State 
has the power of enforcing them through her own courts of law, and 
this aflbrds amp!e protection to all parties, as, before such a tribanal, 
the 1^1 powers and duties of the Trustees would be properly defined. 
This IS, indeed, the only mode of redress, for no law which might be 
passed contravening the rights of the parties under the Trust, would 
be of any legal force. I need not argue this question to any greater 
extent The sound sense of every man must comprehend the fact. 
The prosperity of the State is deeply involved in the prosern**-- 



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and speedy comptetiod o^ tKi^ gt6dt istiKl; atid the bonof and go6d 
faith of Indiana are so solemnly pledged to ophdld and protect the 
Trust for that end, that any act of the Legislature calculated to em- 
barrass the Trustees in their efibrts, could not fail to be injurious to 
every interest of the State, and conflict with the express proTisiofis 
otf the acts referred to. While the work is in a course of construe- 
tion particularly, great forbearance ou^ht to be manifested, for the 
burdens are already weighty, and will increase till the final eompie- 
ion of the canal. 

Doubtless there may be existinjg cases of peculiar hardship ariMng^ 
under this view of the subject. There was a time fixed in the con- 
ti^ftct for the completion of the re-appraisement of these lands. The 
Trustees deny that the fault, (if existing) was theirs. On the 
other liand, it is contended that no fault could attach to the 
State authorities. To decide in the premises is impossible for me to 
do. It seems to me that there can be no doubt, however, if the time 
has passedi and it was the neglect of the Trustees that the work 
was not completed, that there is ample remedy in the Courts of the 
country to compel the performance of the same. 

The State being represented on the Board of Trustees, I cannot 
for a moment believe that that body will refuse relief in all applica- 
tions that come within the spirit and meaning of the laves. Should 
they refuse, the remedy is elsewhere. Your attention is respectfully 
Qalled to this subject; and the same will be found worthy of your 
re-considei*ation. 

JOSEPH A. WRIGHT. 

December 30, 1850. 



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Doc. No. 12J [Part I. 

REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT 



COMMON SCHOOLS, 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 

1850. 

1DS5 



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REPORT. 



Offick of Scperdttendbnt of Common ScMoofts, ) 
Indianapolu, Jan. 16, 1851. ) 

To the General Assembly of the State of Indiana: 

In compliance with the law, I have the honor to submit to yoar 
body the following report in regard to the *»sy9tem of Common 
Schools." I regret the necessity which compels me to famish oneso 
imperfect in its general character, and possessing so little interest m 
detail. It cannot be denied that under the present regulations, an 
"annual report" upon this subject is rather a matter of form, than of 
substance. The figures, indeed, always look imposing in their char- 
acter, and are heralded as the evidence of the noble facilities afforded 
for the development of the intellectual faculties of the youth within 
our borders; but to one familiar with the confused state of the school 
system, they poorly represent the actual resources which we possess. 

No duty pertaining to your honorable body is more just in its im- 
position, or more imperative in its obligation, than that of nroTiding 
for the education of the children of the State. Indiank is mr behind 
some of her sister States on the subject of common schools. Not 
that we lack legislation; we have entirely too much of it. The whole 
subject has attained an intricacy, which requires the first ciinlians 
within our State to unravel; the great mass of the people are unac- 
quainted with its intentions. Many of the Statutes are at intervals 
of years from each other, and but a small proportion of those into 
whose hands falls their administration, possess the means to inform 
themselves perfectly in regard to their duties. It is not unfrequently 
the case, that one set of Trustees appeal to the Superintendent, rely- 
ing on one Statute, and another set relying on another,— each una- 
ware that the conflicting Statute has ever been in force. The ambig* 
nous character too, of these laws admonishes us that some action is 
absolutely demanded, tending to their simplification. They are not 
only difficult of interpretation; they are concealed from popular view, 
in ponderous volumes of the general and special laws of the State; 
insomuch, that the labor and diligence requisite to extract them» would 
almost lead one to suspect that they were not intended for popular use. 



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228 

I would suggest, that mischief, rather than good is effectedy by very 
particular specificatwns as to the requirements of the law. Many 
who would take upon themselves the responsibility of carrying it in- 
to practice, are deterred by the inlSnite liability to which Uiey are 
subjected, of mistaking the character of its unimportant minutia. 
A few general principles should be laid down, and the details in the 
main, bft to the judgment of the people. 

The character of the funds appropriated to the use of schools, is 
a very important feature. At present, ^ common schools ** seem to 
be regarded as a vast receptacle for whatever b deemed valueless or 
irrelevant elsewhere. The funds should, if possible, be reduced to a 
simple and appreciable form. 

I wovdd respectfully suggest to your honorable body the following 
improvements: 

1. A consolidation of all the laws upon the subject of *' Common 
Schools.'' 

2. A simplification of them all, by retrenching whatever may be 
considered superfluous or defective, and adding whatever may be 
deemed worthy of a place. 

. 3. The printings separately, in a convenient form, of the whole 
law* in oraer to its easy transportation, at any time, to any county 
or district in the State. 

. The number of children between the ages of 5 and 21 years, re- 
ported to me from thirty-four counties, is 114,991. From this 
statement, it may be estimated that there are within the State, be^ 
tween the ages mentioned, 300,000. 

In rcjgard to the distinction of sexes, 'the books used, the number 
of teachers, &c., &c., though some counties have presented very 
thorough reports, they are in the main so imperfect that I have 
thought it best not to attempt the preparation of a table. 

The following is a statement of the principal, interest received, 
interest disbursed, and amount supposed to be unsafe, of the Surplus 
Revenue, Saline, Bank Tax, and Congressional Township Funds for 
the year 1849: 

Surplus Revenue Fund. 

Amount of Principal, $494,216 91 

Amount of Interest received, 34,598 SI 

Amount of Interest disbursed, 30,878 55 

Amount of doubtful, '. 21,385 71 

Saline Fund, 

Amount of Principal, $20,039 69 

Amount of Interest received, 1,657 44 

Amount of Interest disbursed, 1,190 90 



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Bank Tax Fund. 

Amount of Principal, #29,923 25 

Amount of Interest received, 1,632 26 

Amount of Interest disbursed, 1,502 06 

Cangresdonal Toumship Fund. 

Amount of Principal, $1,146,035 28 

Amount of Interest received, 87,824 09 

Amount of Interest disbursed, 74,869 79 

Amount of doubtful, ' 2,500 40 

The following is the aggregate of the Principal, Interest received. 
Interest disbursed, and Doubtful of the above Funds, for the year 
1849: 

Toul amount of Principal, $1,690,215 13 

Total amount of Interest received, 125,612 60 

Total amount of Interest disbursed, 108,440 60 

Total amount of doubtful, 23,886 11 

The above embraces the funds of but seventy-two counties, and 
would probably be increased by the eighteen remaining organized 
counties in the State, about one-fifth. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. P. DRAKE, 
Superintendent Common Schools. 



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Doc, No. 18.] [PtetL 

ANNUAL REPORT 



0PTB8 



O0MHI8S1DIIERS AND MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT 



OF 



HOSPITAL FOR THE INSAm 



TO TBI 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 



OF 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



INDIANAPOLia 

J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTIE. 

1850. 
1D36 



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OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTION. 



0«HMiMloa«n« 



JAMES BLAKE, Esq. Pretident. 

L. DUNLAP, M. D., 

E. J. PECK, Esq.. 

8. MAJOR, Esq., 

JAMES RITGHEY, M. D., 

Riv. WILLIAM H. GOODB. 



Saferlateademt. 

R. J. PATTERSON, M. D. 

JkmUtmmt Pky«ielam« 
J. NUTT, M. D. 

Stewari. 
MR. J. M. L. BRADBHAW. 

■atra*. 
MR& L. A. ELUOTT. 



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REPORT. 



To the dtneral Assembly 6f tfie State of Indiana: 

The CoinmiaBioneri of the Indiana Hospild for the Insane, in ttQb- 
Btttiag thn ihcltr sitth annual report, do gite to the Supreme Ruler 
i the Universe their most humble aud heartfelt tbankst for the pre- 
ticting care and numeroua blessings vouehsaled to this institution and 
its inmates during the yeair just dosed. 

On the Slst October, 1850, ended the second year »nce patients 
were fitst admitted into the Hospital- to receive medical treatment, 
daring which time, :on)y the sooth wing of the Hospital had been 
oecQpiod by patients. The north wing of the Hospital is now com* 
pbted with its beadng apparatus and fixtures, and since the close of 
the last year, two wards have been fitted up, and are now occupied;, 
the remaining waiA will, within the next three wedks, be filmislied, » 
when the Hoe^ital irilt be capable of accommodating one hundred * 
sad eighty patients* « 

By reference to the report of the Superintendent it will bo seenv 
that at the eloee ef tke year ending Slst October, id49, there were 
iiventy-sit patients in the Hospital ; and during the year ending 
3l8t Octo&ef, ISM, there was received iii the Hospital, fifty-eight 
patients; making in the aggregate, one hundred and thirty-four pa- 
tients under treatment in the Hospital during the last year. Of tbeee 
there were dtsekarged thirty-eight, who were restored to their won- 
ted reason, competent to resume their respective stations among their 
buniftes and friends ; seven were dbcharged improved ; seven on^ 
improved and incurable, to make room for others who w6re suieep- 
tiUe of relief ^ one eloped and one died; leaving in the institutieu 
<m the Slst October, 1850, eighty patiente. 

NoTB.— Since the Slst October, 1850, 28 patients have been ad- 
mitted into the Hospiiaf; three patients have been discharged cured 
and one has died from dropsy." 



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338 

The Commissioners take great pleasure in being able to state, that 
during the past year, no accident or injury whatever of a personal 
nature, has happened to any of the patients. In this exemp- 
tion from accident we regard the institutioa as remarkably fortunate. 
To pass through all the trying difficulties and perplexities which so 
large a number of insane persons thrown together, must occasioo 
during a period of one year, without accident or personal injury to 
soma of them, must necessarily require the utmost circumspectioo, 
unremitted attention, a high degree of discipline amon^ the patieDtir 
and efficient and faithful officers and attendants. 

These results re/lect the highest credit upon the officers and attend- 
ants of the institution. Tbey fully attest the skill, ability and qd- 
ceasing efforts of those officers and attendants in the dischai^ d 
their rasqpective duties, and afford us the gratifying assurance, that 
the generosity of our people which has been so dieerfally exteadei 
to this institution, will have its reward. 

That only one death bad occurred in the institution, the last year, 
where so many persons were collected tc^ther, all of whom mora 
or less diseased and more or less predisposed to that epidemic, tbe 
cholera, which prevailed the past season, to an alarming extent i& 
the vicinity jof the Hospital, is a souree of much gratification, anJ 
abimdantly attest the medical skill displayed in tfceir treatment, the 
uaieeasing attention which must have been paid t# all things promo- 
tive of their welfare, and the healthiness of thf location aeledted for 
t^ Hospital. 

Nor is it less gratifying to witness tbe sanitsfry results that have 
attended the medical treatment of the patients the post year. That 
37 of this afflicted class of our fellow citizens had during that period 
recovered the r^ht use. of their reason, and eight mora of them bad 
been improved in health and mind, out of a Borober of 134»aomeo( 
whom had been there but a short portion of that time, and aomeaf 
whom, we regret to say, are beyond all hope of recovery, and wen 
so when received into the institution, we r^;ard as auspicbus and oa- 
couraging results. 

. Uniform kindness and gpntleness towards the patients are rigidj 
enjoined and enforced by the Superintendent, upon every, officer aod 
attendant in the institution, and we are gratified in being enabled to 
state, after full and satisfactory inquiry and investigaUion, that tho« 
injunctions have been faithfully observed by those officers and at- 



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To complete tba Hospital and have it fitted for the reeeplibn of 
patients the present winter* required a greater expenditure ia the lost 
two years, than the revenue appropriated to Hospital purposes 
would justify ; and hence the CominlssioneTs had been authorized by 
the General A8BambIy» to antidpate a portbn of the revenue of the 
ncceeding years, to make available from time to time, apartments 
then in progress of oompletion. Both polioy and necessity dictated 
thn coarse. To leave apartmeuts partly fioiabed, when so many of 
OUT aiBicted citizens were suffering for medical treatment in the 
Hospital, and when by an expenditure of a comparatively small 
sum those apartments could be completed, and thus afford them an 
opportunity to be relieved from their sufferings and rescue from an un» 
timely grave, would have been injudicious and forgetful of the be- 
nevolent purposes for which the institution was designed. These 
expenditures have been so made as not to impose a greater burden, 
in any one year, and so that the revenue appropriated to Hospital 
parposas might defray the expenses attending the Hospital. 

Thsse considerations induced the General Assembly of last winter 
to aothorixe the commissioners to anticipate $13,000 00 of the rev- ' 
eane of 1850, so that the Hospital building might be finished at the 
earliest practicable period. This sum has been furnished the Com- 
mianoners by the Treasurer, and wiU, in accordance with the law 
granting it, be retained out of the revenue of the year 1850. This, 
sum, deducted from the revenue of 1850, whicb^the Treasurer esti- 
mates at about $adfiOO 00, will leave $7,000 00; to which add 
11315 S3, the balance in the Treasury for Hospital purposes oh the 
Slst October, 1850; leave #8315 5I& to meet the liabilities for w*>rlt 
and materials, in finishing and furnishing the Hospital, and to defray 
the cum^nt expenses, for the support of the inmates, ofiicers and at- 
tendants for the eoming year. Those liabilities the Superintendent 
«timttes at about f7,000, end for the support of 160 patients, at- 
^^ants and ofiieers and their salaries for the coming year ak 
PVHaH 00. TUs Will leave a deficit of about $10,000 00 at the 
^lose of the coming year, for which sum the Commissionera respebt* 
^^ly reqpiest, that a law be passed authorising them to anticipate that 
^nonnt of he revenue of the succeeding year, 

'Rtat there has been an economical and judicious expenditure of 
^ funds appropriated to the erection of this Hospital, we need only 
^r to the statement of the Superintendent, showing the cost et 



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streral instilnltons for die Insane in the United Butte; iqr 'vriiich it 
wiU be seen that the Indiana Hospital cost deaiiy one-haif leiB» in 
proportion to itscapacitj, than the average cost of thoB6 iastitutioiis» 
except that in Ohio» with which it seeins to be nearly eqeal, with this 
difference, however, that the Ohio Hospital was built by conviols. 

No comparison can be instituted between the cost of eroctb^ an 
Hospital for the Inaane, and other public bididings ; such a compari- 
sen would be deceptive* 

There are so many things necessary in the c<Histruction of an 
Hospital for the Insane, that are not required in other buildings^ and 
the internal structure so different, that any comparative estioMte by 
the cubic foot, nmst be fallacious* 

The Hospital is a plain, neat, substantial and durable buiMiag. 
The materials employed in its construction are of good qualiiy^ and 
the workmanship is creditable to those who performed iU All sopiN^ 
flkiDUs work has been from the beginning, studiously avoided in its 
construction, and in every particular it is well adapted to the purpose 
for which it was designed. The proper ventilation of the rooms 
occupied by the patients, was regarded as of the utmost importance. 
To this matter much care and attention was directed, and il is be- 
lieved that the means adopted for ventilation, will secure to the pa* 
tients aisr pure and healthy an atmosphere in their rooms, as itia piTac* 
ticable to furnish them. 

The mode of heaiing institutions for the famae, is a sulyeot that 
has attracted the attention of the most experi^Ksed and soieaiific in 
that department ; and the plan adopted for heating the Indiana Hos- 
pi'al, is generally regarded the most approved. 

In one particular it is pre-eminent to any other made, nameh)' : 
The healthiness of the heated air which it imparts to the patients. 
This consideration alone, is auffioienl^ to render such a mode decidedly 
pnsferable to any' other, for insane persons. Their health is gener- 
ally very much impaired, and they require the use of all auxiliaries 
tbilt can b^ called in aid of medKcal treatment to restore tiiei^ faealtli 
and shattered minds. 

It is only in the centre building of the Hospit4l that stoves, or foe 
places are in use, Thoi latter only where the roooa are cpnatantly 
oocupied by some of the inmates of the Hospital ; the former, where 
lees so. The apartments occupied by the patients, being heated in the 
md» first above referred to, with the exception of one close sto^, the 



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mtients timf be r«gftfd«d>tt9 se^miViHin dafig«r» as from the beating 
ipparatusy h is deemed Impossible for fii^ lo be confimunicated to 
heir apartments or any aceidebt happen to them from that cause. 
MTherever stoves or fire places are used, such precautions are regularly 
esorted ta, thdit but fitlle if any appt^hensions can be entertained for 
[he safety of the entire l)uiKfiAg. But in tfte event of such accidenl, 
ihe patients would oci^npy not only the safbst position, but ceuld 
escape with entire safety. 

The heating apparatus is placed about one hundred feet fix>m the' 
building occupied' by the patients. 

We have been induced to make this statement, in relation to the 
comparative security of the Indiana Hospital from fire, In conse- 
quence of the sad catastrophe that has recently befallen the Hospital 
for the Insane in the State of Maine. 

By reference to the report of the Siiperintendent, will be seen the 
product of the Hospital farm during the last year, which he esti- 
mates at about one thousand dollars. This is principally the product 
of the labor of the patients, in which they engage with much pleasure, 
and which proves highly beneficial to them in the restoration of their 
health. It is for the latter purpose tbey aj*e permitted to work, and 
when labor will not have that effect, the patients are not allowed to 
engage ia it. And While the farm furnishes employment to the male 
pitients who are able to engage in labor, and thus enable them to 
!«» their time more agreeably to themselves and ' profitably to the 
institution; the female patients are employed, when not exercising 
in the open atr» in making materials for the institution, such as mat- 
resses, comforts, sheets, pillows, &c., and also in making such fancy 
articles as their tastes may suggest, and thereby, while they are con- 
tnbutiDg to the maintenance of the institution, they are diverting 
their own minds from meditating upon their bereaved condition. 
I'he female patients who are convalescent and able to engage in those 
employments, seek them with much eagerness, and are very anxious 
^^ be engaged in some useful employment. Some of them have been 
taught by their fellow patients, to read and write, and while in th« 
Hos|Hial became able to correspond with their friends by letter. 

It it due the excellent Superintendent and to the other officers of 
this institution, to state, that they have discharged their respective 
^^ties in a highly satisfactory manner, and justly merit our acknowl* 
^gn^eats, for the fidelity and ability with which those duties have 
^^^ performed. 



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34(1 

The CommUsioner; take great pleasure in opngratulating yoar hon- 
orable body* and the good people of Indiana, upon the completion 
of the north wing of the Hospital for the Insane. But two years 
have elapsed since patients were first receii'ed into, the HoapitaL 
During that short period many an anxious heart has been made to 
rejoice over the restoration of a near and beloved relative, rescued 
as it^were from the hands of death; and from the gratifying success 
which has hitherto attended the treatment of the patients in thb in- 
stitutioQf the Commissioners, in view of the increased facilities^which 
the completion of the Hospital affords, feel justified in the expecta- 
tion, that still more gratifying and successful results await the future 
efforts of the officers of this institution. 

That it may please Divine Providence to bestow upon this insti- 
tution His fostering and protecting care, and crown with success the 
efforts of those to whose immediate charge and management this 
afflicted class of our fellow citizens kr intrusted, are the most fervent 
wishes of 

JAMES BLAKE, ^ 
JAMES RITCHEY, 
L. DUNLAP, 
EDWIN J. PECK, 
WM. H. GOODE, 
STEPHEN MAJOR, 



> CammiMmnen. 



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SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 

or THB 

MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT 

OF THB 

INDIANA HOSPITAL FOft THE INSANE. 



To the Board of Commissioners: 

Gbntlsmen : With devoat admowledgmenU of gratitude to AU 
mighty God for his continued tmilei, and for the degree of suc- 
cess with which our labors hare been crowned^ this Annual Report 
is respectfully submitted. 

It is no small cause for joy and gratitude, that the labors of another 
year have been concluded, without the occurrence of a single case 
of suicide» or other serious accident to any of the unfortunate per- 
sons sommitted to our care, and that the wasting pestilence which 
has been even nigh to our dwelling, has not been permitted to enter, 
but instead, that general health, peace and prosperity have attended 
as throughout the year. ^ 

During the months of July and August, there was great proneness 
among our patients to diarrhoea and other bowel complaints, but by 
strict attention to cleanliness throughout the establishment, by a 
prescribed diet and prompt medical treatment when indicated, through 
the blessing of Divine Providence, no case was tost or even siiffei'ed 
materially from these affections. With these exceptions, there has 
been but little sickness at the hospital, during the year, notwithstand- 
ing cholera and other kindred diseases prevailed alarmingly in the 
country about us. One case only has died at the hospital during the 
year. Of the one hundred and sixty-two admitted since the open- 
ing of the Institution, a period of nearly two years, five deaths only 
have occurred, and all of these resulted from diseases contracted be« 
fore their admission. From these facts I infer, that the Commission- 
ers have been fortunate in selecting a very healthy location for this 
Institution. 



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TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of CommiMsionera of the 

Indiana Hospital Jar the Insane, 

Gbntlbmen: — Below please find a statement of the receipts and 
disbursements of hospital for the year ending Oct. 31, 1850. 

Receipts, 

Balance in Treasurer's hands Oct. 31, 1849, $1,105 04 

Rec'd by S. Hannah on sale of lots in Hospital square, 266 66 

Rflc'd by S. Hannah check on Branch Bank, 4,000 OO 

Roc'd by S. Hannahcash check, 166 11 

RecM by J. P. Drake Revenue of '49, and delinquent 

Revenue of '48, 20,616 89 

RecM loan a« provided by law, 13,000 00 

Rec'd onsalt: of lots in hospital square, 699 97 

Total receipts, fS9,854 67 



Amount Disbursed^ to-wit. 

Cash paid by & Hannah as per orders of the 
Board of Commissioners, f5f537 81 

Cash paid by J. P. Drake on orders of the 
Board of Commissioners, 17,399 80 

Cash paid on Hospital debts, on loan of 1849,. 14,704 03 

Cash paid for interest on loans^ 897 60 



• 



$38,039 14 



Balance in hospital Treasury Oct. 31, 1850,. . $1,815 58 

t ■ ■ '■ * = 

X P. DRAKE, 

Tre€tsurer* 



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.045 

Abstract of the accoants of the Indiana Hospital for the Insane, 

from Oct. SI, 1849, to Oct. 31, 1850, for cash expended upon the 

Hospiial Buildingg, for furniture of all kinds and pernumeni fixtures^ 

. and for the current eocpenn^foi* the support of the hospital during the 

year. 

Cash paid on account of BmUdiwgs^ 

CaA paid for brick and Mason work, $1,004 90 

Cash paid for CarpeRtere* work, p,977 30 

Cash paid for Lime and Cement,*^ 50 12 

Cashpaidfor Plastering, 1,299 19 

Gash paid for hauling, 4 85 

Gash paid for hardware and castings, 807 53 

Cash paid for Smith work, 65 93 

Gash paid for salaries of Commissioners and Archi- 
tecture, • 505 86 

Gash paid for freights, exchange and commission,* • 185 38 

Gash paid for IkDberand lumMr, liS72 38 

Oath paid for traveling expenses,- • 103 72 

Cash paid for labor, 407 80 

-Cash paid for stone work, 5 00 

Oath paid foe paintiagr- • 573 » 

Amount chargeable to buildings, $9,260 94 



Cash paid for mrJMM improvements and permanent Jixtures^ andfb 
furmiurt cf allMnds. 

Gash paid for dumbing, $213 98 

Gash paid far.fwmituns of all kiAils, • 1,049 47 

Gash paid for repairs and improvement, 438 98 

Gash paid for iHH>ks for library, ...••. 5 .96 

Gash paid for farming utensils, 202 65 

Cashpaid for Jive 5tock, 229 00 

Cash paid for ma;eri«)s for matresaes and beddingf 317 77 

Cashpaid for cisterns .dtc,.. 200 02 

Gash pakl for heating apparatus &c., 1,949 50 

$4,606 62 



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346 



€k»k paid far current eaipensesforjthe sMfpaH^, ike HasfiiaL 

Ca.sh paid for attendance and la|)or» (salaries in- 
eluded,) • ^ . • 4 • ." . . 

Gash paid for funeral expenses, 

Cash paid for hay, oats and straw, 

Cash paid for fuel and lights, • 

Cash paid for medicines, '• 

Cash paid for stationary and printing, 

Cash paid for postage, • • • ♦ . 

Cash paid for clothing for patients, • • • • • 

Cash paid patients on discharge«« • 

Cash paid for groceries, and provisions of all kiada, 



fS^l 74 


doo 


76 61 


539 90 


106 60 


4St 43 


43 49 


296 47 


143 45 


4,160 43 


$8,996 13 



BSVUfOS VOR THB COHXRO TBAX.' 



The Revenue arising from taxation as provided for by 

lawwill probably amount to 30^000 QO 

Balance in the treasury Nov. 1, 18dO| 1,815 58 

Estimated amount of hospital fund for the coming yei^r, $31«815 5S 



From the above revenue, the Treasurer of State, is 

required by law of last winter, to retain the sum of 13,000 00 

After the above deduction by the Treasurer of State, 
there will remain for hospital purposes $S315 53 

BSTiMAnm sxnonBs for thb oohihq tkaB. 

There will be reoUifed for the support of the hospital 
one year, with tme hundred and sixty paiimiSt 
(officers' salaries included) about* • • • • • 19^069 

To pay for steam heating apparatus, Engine, plumbing, 
and other outstanding debts, 7,000 

Estimated amount of expenditures for the coming year» $19,000 

It will be seen by the above estimates, that the expenses for the 
next year will exceed the available revenue for the same period, 

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ind theoefbre respeetfolty ttiggesi to jour B6ard, the propriety of 
asking permission of the Legislature to allow the imtitotion to anttei- 
pate a part of its rerettue for the year 1852, by the loan of Ten 
thousand dollars^ In the manner aathorieed by the last Legislature, 
and in like mannef to be retained by the Treasurer of State from 
the first moneys received by him for hospital purposes for the year 
1854. 



At tke dose of the last yeajr* there were 



Remaining at the hospital,* 
Admitted daring the year,* 



Total nnmber under care during the year,* 

Of these there have been discharged* 

Recovered, 

Improved, 

Unimproved, 

£\apsed, 

Died, 



Total number discharged during the year,! 
Remaining at the hospital Slst Oct. 1850,* 



35 
31 



66 



17 
6 
I 
1 
1 



26 



40 



41 
27 



68 



30 
3 
6 

a 



88 



40 



Tafl 

76 

58 



134 



37 

8 
7 
1 
1 



54 



SO 



or the fifly-four patients who have been sent from the institation 
during the year, thirteen were discharged by order of your Board. 
as mcnrable. to make room for cnrable, and more urgent cases. 
We have r^retted die necessity which requires the removal of some 
of these, feeling that though incurable, they were still proper sub> 
jects for hospital care, and knowing that n6 adequate provisions had 
been, or could be speedily procured for them, whidier they were 
»enl. 

Ia this connection I cannot l^ut expnesa the vJ«h that at »0| distattt 
day, comfortable provisions will be made for a few harmless and in- 
curably insane pervooain every .county in t^e State. It will be 
^ound impracticable to provide a hospitable sufficiently lai;ge to ac- 
cofflmodate the six hudred insane persgnsof eveiy gradft who are 
*OK>Bg us as citUseps of 'th9'C<«njaoiiweAlth, and who seek that pro- 
tection and relief which in. most instaqeM^aD {^oae cpme ffora the 
band of charity. As Alms Houses must sooner or later be erected 



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in Iht variput couDtiii Ip iheStat^, wbera locb iiuiliMiltpi» do now 
eiistf il ■eeiai to me ir%ry d^rable» ia coistmcting. ibfeM boildin^i^ 
to pro?ide for the care «nd safe keeping of aooh insane perpoiis ms 
may be harmless and iacurable» in the counties where they reside. 
The great repugnance which most persons feel to placing their 
friends in County Poor Houses^ arises in part from the oame^ — Poor 
House, and in [Art from the fact that in too many instances the 
name is quite significant of the accommodations afforded. The ex- 
isting prejudices against these truly hmmme inslitulioM, ooeid easily 
be ren^oved, and tbeir usefulness greatly increased, by making them 
in all respects what they should be, and by changing their name 
(County Poor House) to that of County Infirmary* 

It is to be hoped that the admi:ision of chronic, incurable cases will 
not be uiged to the extent of exekidiiig those more WMy to be ben- 
efited by hospital care as this will place your board under the dis- 
agreeable necessity of either refusing applicants that may be re- 
stpredi Of of dischargiog and removing incurable cases at the expense 
of the ccMnlies flrom which they were sent. But while we would 
not encoorage the admission of those who are beyond cure, we can- 
not too strongly recommend early remedial treatment for the in- 
sane. As a general rule, insaaity is o^iy curable in its early stage. 
If properly treated within the first few months of the attack, a very 
large per ami. wUl be cured. It has been customary at the l^nnatic 
Asylum in Ohio to report the per ceni. of recoveries oa the number 
of patients duc/u^-ged from the institution from year to year. In 
,M>xne institutions the per cent, of recoveries^ is computed upon the 
numhtr ixdmiited, and no uniform mode of comjparing results seems 
to have been adopted. If we follow the mode of reporting hereto- 
fore adopted at the State Asylum in Ohio, by Dr. Awl, our recove- 
ries on the recent cases discharged^ is more than ninety per cent. If 
we follow the method practised in some other institutions, the per 
cfmt of recoveries wHl be less than that above named. From print- 
ed reports, h appears that the results of well conducted institutions 
Tor the insane in the United States and Great Britain are much the 
same, and we believe that the remedial ti^tment adopted in the 
Indiana Hospital for the Insane, has resulted as favorably as that 
adopted in other institutions wfaidi have been put into operatioa 
under similar circumManees. 



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249 

In addition to the number of recoveries mentioned in the forego* 
ing table, there are others who are nearly well» and stiK several oth. 
ers who are rapidly improving, and will be able to return to their 
homes in a few weeks, at most. 

It is now less than two years since a portion of the Indiana Hospi- 
tal for the Insane was opened for the reception of patients. During 
that period, Jifty-eight have been restored to the right use of their 
reason, and have returned to their homes, in the enjoyment of health. 
The year that has jnst closed, has been attended with greater success 
than the preceding: a proportionably greater number having recov* 
ered, and the bill of mortality being less. Since the last annual 
meeting of your Board, many a heart, ready to sink with deepest 
afflictions, has been made to rejoice over the restoration of those 
who have been sent forth from this institution, "clothed, and in their 
right mind." Some who had been consigned to a felon's eell, for 
tocn'me, but for misfortunes only, have been raised from the living 
sepulchres in which they had been entombed ; and restored to iiea- 
>oq's sway, have returned to their homes, to 611 stations of usefulness 
in society, and to gladden the desolate hearts of sorrowing and de- 
pendent families. 

Among those who have been under our care, during the past year, 
are the rich and the poor, the learned and the unlearned, the old 
tnd the young, the homicidal and the suicidal, the raving maniac and 
the subject of dark melancholy. No rank or station, no circumstan- 
ces or habits of life, seem to afford an entire immunity from this dis» 
wse; and there is no one of the numerous citizens of our happy 
commonwealth, who is not liable to need the care of this, or some 
other institution for the mentally diseased. 

Twelve months ago, a lady of much respectability and excellence 
w*d comfortable health, mental and physical, and was in the enjoy- 
ment of all the blessings of society and friends. Severe afflictions 
visited her family, attended with ill health, loss of sleep, anxiety and 
fatigue. Nervous irritability and decided mental aJieimtion soon 
followed. When b/ought to the Hospital, all was gloom ; every 
™ught was sad, and every contemplation seemed to overwhelm her 
mind with dark and fearful forebodings. She had repeatedly attempt* 
«d self-destruction by starvation, by hanging, and in various other 
1D2 



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250 

vrays had tried to put an end to her miserable existence. Horror, 
agitation and alarm, in short, all that constitutes extreme wretched- 
ness, was hers. There being apparent physical disease, this lady was 
put upon appropriate medical treatment, her mind calmed, soothed ^ 
and encouraged, and her person guarded to prevent suicide. Under 
hospital treatment and care, slight improvement was in a short 
time manifest. Light, though useful employment, was r^ularly 
furnished; innocent amusements were allowed; much exereise in 
the open air was taken, by walking and riding; and in four months 
from the date of her admission, she was returned to her home, in the 
enjoyment of fine health and spirits, and is aow a useful member of 
society, a blessing to her family and friends, and a monument attest* 
ing the efficacy of philanthropic science to gather up, and build anew 
the scattered fragments of the human mind in ruins. 

In the month of a respectable farmer was taken from the jail 

of county, where he had been placed for safe keeping ; was 

bound with strong cords, and conveyed to the hospital for treatment. 
His insanity was probably the result of religious excitement, of the 
variety, — Mormonbm. He was sleepless, noisy, violent, raving mad. 
His cords were immediately loosed, temporary solitude, baths, medi- 
cines and diet suited to his condition, were prescribed, and faithfully 
administered. He soon became calm, was admitted to society, con- 
tinued to take such medicines as are calculated to allay nervous irri- 
tation, and invigorate the system ; took much exercise in the open 
air— by riding, walking, ball-playing and laboring upon the farm ; 
and in three months from the time of his admission, left the Hospital 
in excellent healtli, and resumed his place as a husband and parent, 
at the head of a large and dependent family. 

A young lady was admitted from county — insanity of two 

months duration. She had been maniacal in the commencement of 
her disease, for which, to her great injury, she had been repeatedly 
and excessively bled, and which, I doubt not produced a far more 
alarming condition; that approaching to dementia. She was per- 
fectly incoherent — her sensibility, understanding and will were pros- 
trated. The brain had lost the power to perceive or retain impress- 
ions—unmeaning words and sentences were unconsciously uttered. 
Her memory was gone ; she was without desires or aversions, joys or 
sorrows, love or hatred — without interest in passing events, without 



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851 

l^ent, or ideas upon which to reason. She was almost bloodless, 
ring lost several quarts within the space of a few weelts — pale, 
Kciated, feeble, mindless— and altogether, a most pitiable creature. 
loi^-coQtinaed care, and perseverance in the use of remedies, the 
id was reclaimed from its incoherent mutterings, and aroused from 
torpor; and this excellent, and hitherto useful lady, was restored 
bealth, both mental and physical. She left the hospital in four 
inthsfrom the time of her admisrfon, and has since remained well. 



TABLE No. 1. 
Alleged Ctnmt tf Ctuet •dmitud Htue Dee. 1848. 



aknown, 

health of Tarious kinds, 

temperate drinking,' ? 

buse froin drunken husbands, 

iceeive use of tobacco, 

<w of property, 

I treatment from relations, 

•omestic afflictions, 

eligious excitement and anxieties,* • 

atntse application to study, 

Ksappobtment in love, 

^W. 

Vantofoceopatioo, 

''alse aecosation and imprisonment, • 

Dduigenee of temper, 

ealoiisy 

^xposare and fatigue, 

'nerperal, 

^xcesnve use of quinine, 

^PPobted amlHtion, 

ym irritation, 

*u'B»cal operation, 

^ of sleep and exposure, 

Mexican war excitement, 



Pulmonary disease,- 
lia, < 



jDjnry of the head,- 
™««tnrbation, 



w ^ vile books,' 
Alesmerisni, 



Mim. 

90 
4 
8 



2 
3 
1 
1 
5 
4 
3 
5 
2 
1 



2 
3 



1 
4 
1 



1 
2 
2 
1 
1 



16 
19 



1 
1 
5 
5 
3 
3 
1 



I 

3 

2 

10 



1 
2 



TttU. 

36 

23 
8 
3 
2 
4 
2 
6 

10 
7 
6 
6 
2 
1 
1 
3 
9 

10 
2 
3 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 
1 
I 
2 
2 
1 
1 



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TABLE No. 3. 

■"• 

Farmers, 28 | 

Laborer, 17 

Merchants, • • • » 4 

Stodents • 4 

Clwks, 4 

Shoemakers, 3 

Blacksmiths, 5 

Physicians, 2 

Teachers, * • 5 

Tailors, • • • 2 

Wagonmaker, 

Plasterer, 

Brewer, 

Miiier, 

Cooper, • • • 

Chairmakers, • • * 

Clergyman, 

Pumpmaker, 

Musician, • 



Total,: 84 

WOMKN. 

Housework, • 63 

School Girls, 9 

Tailoress, • 4 

Instructress, 3 

78 

Total, lea 



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353 

TABLE No. 3. 
Showing the Ages at which insanity commenced. 

Under 90 years of age, 18 

From 20 to 25 years of age, ^ 

From 25 to 30 years of age, 31 

From 30 to 35 years of age, 2T 

From 25 to 40 years of age, 16 

From 40 to 45 years of age, 10 

From 45 to 50 years of age, H 

From 50 to 55 years of age, 9 

From 55 to 60 years of age, 3 

From 60 to 65 years of age, 3 

From 65 to 70 years of age, 1 

From 70 to 75 years of age, 

TABLE No. 4. 
Showing the Nativity <f Patients. 

State of Indiana, 40 

* *• Ohio, 29 

" •« Kentucky, J* 

« « Virginia,' 17 

" «* Pennsylvania, • 12 

" «< South Carolina, 2 

« « New York, 8 

♦* « North Carolina; 6 

** « Tennessee, 2 

" •* Vermont, * 

•• Maryland, • • 2 

" New Jersey, • • 

Connecticut, * 



li 

M 



^ Michigan 



1 

Geoi^ia, J 

" « New Hampshire, J 

•* « Maine, 1 

Ireland, ^ 

Germany, 8 

Scotland. 2 

England, • • • * 

Switzerland, J 

Prussia, J 

Canada, 1 



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254 

TABLE No. 5. 
Social Candiiian. 



Marriedy 
Single, • • 



TABLE No. 6. 



Statistics of the Indiana Hospital far the Insane from Dec. \st,l^ 
to Oct. Zlst, 1850, inclusive. 



Number of patientfi admitted, 

Number of patients discharged, 

Recovered, 

Improved, 

Unimproved, 

Eloped, 

Died, 

Average number in the Hospital during the 

year, 

Number remaiuinff at the end of the year, 

Number of men admitted, 

Number of women admitted, • • • 

Chronic Cases admitted, 

Recent Cases admitted, 

Number of men discharged, 

Number of women discharged, .*•••. 

Number of men recovered, 

Number of women recovered, 

Number of men died, 

Number of women died, - • • 

Chronic Cases discharged, 

Recent Cases discharged, • 

Chronic Cases recovered, < 

Recent Cases recovered, < 



1849. 


I860. 


rd 


104 


58 


W 


ao 


38 


SS 


4 


8 


u 




7 


7 




1 


1 


4 


1 


5 


50 


80 




76 


79 


155 


53 


31 


SI 


51 


37 


7S 


74 


1« 


fO 


30 


41 


71 


18 


36 


44 


10 


98 


3S 


13 


17 


30 


7 


90 


*; 


3 


I 


4 


1 




1 


7 


19 


% 


21 


35 


5< 


3 


3 


i 


17 


36 


5i 



We continue to report a large number of patients under care, vli^ 
have had insane ancestors and I'datives. Nothing is more certaifi 
than that a susceptibility or predisposition to insanity may be inlis: 
ited from parents. 



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255 

The children often escape, when tlie efiects of hereditary disease 
are clearly seen in the grandchildren. It b believed that this pre- 
diapoeition to disease is more frequently inherited from the mother 
than from the father. The intermarrying of relatives is a cause of 
d^eneracy of both mind and body, and tends indirectly to insanity. 
In several instances that have come to our notice during the past 
year, more than one member of the same family have become insane. 
There are in the Hospital, at this time, two sisters from one family, 
a brother and sister from another. We have had during the past 
year a father and his daughter; and applications have been made for 
the admission of two brothers and a sister. We have also, as is rare- 
ly the case, a husband and his wife as patients in the institution; but 
neither of the last mentioned cases so far as I can learn, suffer from 

hereditary taint. The husband became insane from ,and the 

wife from anxiety and loss of sleep, in the care of her afflicted fam- 
ily, during the early period of the husband's insanity. 

These are indeed severe afflictions. They fall heavily upon the 
soul, and are sufficient to make the stoutest heart quail. Families 
broken up, and the different members thereof scattered under cir- 
cumstances the most painful and trying. The brother, a raving ma- 
niac; and the sister, sitting in melancholy darkw than night; a re- 
pose Biore dreadful, and a silence more fearful than that of the grave. 
These are the woes which Indiana, by establishing a hospital for the 
insane, seeks to assuage. She hath done nobly in this. She wilt not 
see those of her children, are who already grievously afflicted, receiv- 
ing stones while asking bread. Indiana could boast not of her bold 
streams and fertile plains, while no refuge, but the felon's cell, could 
be found within her ample borders, in which the child of misfor- 
tune might find a shelter and a resting place from the stonns of 
adversity. 



BUII4DINGS. 

The principal hospital buildiiigs ore bow nearly qoBipkHed. They 
are good, substantial structures, and well adapted to (heir Intended 
uses. We think they have been constructed with a due regard to 
economy, and the greatest good and comfort of the class of persons 
who are to occupy them. 



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256 

The cost of these buildings per cubict foot, cannot, with any pro- 
priety, be placed in comparison with any other public building of 
the State, because the peculiar uses for which the hospital buildings 
were erected, have required a construction and fixtures which no 
other State edifice requires. Their cost cannot be compared with 
that of a prison, for at a hospital for insane persons, not only is se- 
curity required, but also ample provisions for the health and personal 
comfort of each invalid. It cannot, (as has been attempted,) with 
propriety, be compared to those for the use of the Deaf and Dumb, for 
the reason that security is here essential, and that the apartments for 
the insane require irany fixtures that are needed by no other class of 
persons. The single item of iron sash, was obtained at an extra cost of 
neariy two thousand dollars; and eighty per cent, of all persons com- 
mitted to hospital care must be furnished with a distinct apartment sep- 
arated throughout by strong brick partition walls which add nothing 
to the cubical contents of the buildings, as measured for the purpose 
of compaiison. There iji, however, less impropriety in instituting a 
comparison betweeja the cost of thb, and other similar structures for 
similar purposes^ in the adjoining, and other States. 



Cost df various Institutions Jhr the Insane in the United States, in- 
cluding landist oui-buttdingSf furniture^ and JixtureSj 4fC. 




Cost. 



Maine Hospital, Augusta, 

McLean Asylum, Sommerville, Mass., 
State Hospital, Worcester, Mass.,- • • • 
New York Asylum, Bloomingdale,* • • 
New York State Asylum, Utica,* • • '" 
New Jersey State Asylum, Trenton,- 
Pbnnfiiyttaaia Hospital, Pt»iladelphia,* 

Virginia Asylum, Stauifcloo, 

' Sk>uth Carolina Asylum, Columbus,- - 

Ohio Asylum, Columbus, 

Indiana Hospital, Indianapolis, 



150 


iiss^ooo 


300 


250,000 


430 


155,000 


150 


220,000 


470 


436,000 


200 


154,000 


300 


335,000 


320 


I06/)00 




100,000 


350 


160,000 


180 


85.000 



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257 

tie State Asylum in Ohio was built almost entirely by convict 
labor, at from thirty-five to forty cents per day. Several of the in- 
slitutions in tlie above table have been enlarged since the reports and 
papers from which the estimates taken were published, but we have 
not the means of knowing tLeir increased capacity or expense. 

The strong rooms mentioned ia our last annual report for the 
noisy and torbulent class of patients ai*o nearly completedj and when 
occupied will add much to the comfort of the household generally, 
and especially relieve the convabscenl and peaceably, disposed pa- 
tients, from many annoyances to which they have hitherto been 
subjected. 



HEATING APPARATUS, FIXTURES, &c. 

The wanning and ventilating of large buildings and especially of 
Hospitals for the Insane, is a subject of the highest importance. The 
great point to be secured is, to furnish for every apartment a con- 
stant and abundant supply directly from the pure atmosphere with- 
out, of air moderately heated by some agent which is not liable to 
injure the quality of this food for the lungs, and render it unfit for re- 
spiration, and at the same time to extract the foul air from every apart- 
ment by means of a forced ventilation. Air passed over iron surfaces 
heated to redness^ is materially inj ured by the process, and rendered es- 
pecially objectionable in apartments continually occupied by invalids, 
nrho more than others, need a supply of pure air moderately heated, 
and a steady forced ventilation^ proportionate in amount to the 
number and physical condition of the occupants of the building. . 

Furnaces of every description having proved unsatisfactory in 
ivarming insane hospitals, it was detersniQed to introduce steam,^ as 
Jie safest against accidents, and the best known agent for producing 
he most desirable temperature, and for thoroughly ventilating the 
vards of this institution. The apparatus consists of two four-flue 
toilers, each twenty feet in length and four feet in diameter, con- 
nected to a large amount of wrought iron welded steam pipe. 

The boilers are placed in the uodergrouud story of the wash 
Ottse, one hundred feet in the rear and twenty feet below the main 
uildings. The steam is conducted from the boilers through iron 



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. 358 

pipes laid ia an underground passage^ to the hot air chambers in tin 
basement below the several apartments to be warmed. The stean 
is then passed through ranges of wrought iron tubing of small li^ 
ameter, which become heated to the requisite degree. An abundE 
supply of pure cold air is admitted directly from without, throu^^ 
numerous apertures at the bottom of the hot air chamber. Theai' 
thus admitted, comes in contact with the heated surfaces of thesteaia 
pipes, and is thereby raised to the proper temperature, and tto 
drawn through numerous flues to the various rooms and wards oc- 
cupied by the patients. The steam on its passage through theai- 
ous ranges of pipes, is condensed, — becomes water, which is coDvej- 
ed directly ba,ck into the boilers without loss or artificial force, to Ix 
reconverted into steam, and again to perform its circuit as befoi^ 
carrying heat to the various apartments of the hospital 

Although the first cost of the apparatus is somewhat ezpensire,: 
is believed it will last many years, and furnish the most Awni 
temperature at the least possible consumption of fueL The spce 
warmed by this apparatus, is about/our hundred thousand cubic jt^^ 
to warm which by large ten plate stoves, would require at least rj- 
teen in number. The amount of wood consumed in twenty-fo^' 
hours, does not exceed one and a half cords, at an expense of t^' 
dollars, which is about one and a fourth cents per day, for each p^i 
tient properly warmed. All the wards of the hospital except odv 
are now heated by steam. Sufficient time will be requii-ed dur^ 
the warm season, to make some changes in the construction of o:^ 
of the hot air chambers, before a free current of air into this^^^j 
can be produced. Although the apparatus promises well at pre^ec' 
it is proper to remark that it will require the severe cold of winter 
fully to test its merits. 

Steam is also used for pumping, for cooking, for heating water tof 
washing, bathing, &c. Cold water in abundance is forced by oieui^ 
of a steam pump, to the large reservoirs in the attic of tbem^ 
building, from which it is drawn to the various apartments where ^^ 
is needed* 

A large iron tank, holding fifty barrels is placed alongside of ^^ 
boilers before mentioned, from which is drawn all the hot ^^^ 
used throughout the wards of the hospital, wash-house, &c. T^* 
large body of water is heated by passing a jet of steam through ^' 



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S59 

ges of pipe placed and firmly secured within this tank. Other pipes 
leading from the top of this tank distribute the hot avatar in aibund- 
ance to the wash-house, bath-rooms, &c. A cold water pipe lead- 
ing from the large reservoirs in the attic of the main building, termi- 
nates in the bottom of this hot water tank, thus supplying it, and at 
the same time, by the weight of its column, forcing the hot water 
from the top of the tank through pipes to every part of the building 
where needed. 

The heating apparatus, hot water fixtures, &c., have been made 
and put into opperation by Messrs. Reynolds, Kite & Tatum, of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, and the work skiflfolty executed by John L. Kite, En- 
gineer and Machinist. 

Under the judicious management of the steward, Mr. James M. 
Ln Bradshaw, the farm and garden have produced abundantly, and 
\rill aid materially in the support of the institution during the com- 
ing yean The work upon the farm has been done, principally, by 
the patients, and the value of the products of the farm which are in 
store for future use, as the result of their industry, cannot be estima- 
ted at less than one thousand dollars. But the principal benefit de- 
rived from labor upon the fiirm, is to be found in the renewed health 
and strength of those thus occupied. Out-of-doors employment, is 
one of the principal means of cure with some, and an almost indis- 
pensable auxiliary in the remedial treatment of many. The fallow- 
ing are some of the products of the farm as enumerated by the 

steward : 

540 bushels of corn. 
540 bushels of Irish potatoa<t. 
25 bushels of sweet potatoes. 
100 bushels of*oatB. 
100 bosbeb of turnips. 
30 bushels of onions. 
40 bushels of parsnips. 
90 bushels of beets. 
100 bushels of tomatoes. 
10 bushels of carrots. 
10 bushels of beans. 
80 bushels of peas. 
7000 pounds of pork. 

8 tons of hay. 
2000 heads of cabbage. 
Besides the above we have had an abundant supply of cucumbers, 
pasture for stock, &c. &c. The farm, has been put in good repair, 
and can now easily be kept so, with proper management. 



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The womeQt such of them as are able, have been induslrioosly ea- 
gaged within doors. They have prepared bedding, including the 
making of matresses and pillows for seventy-six beds, all complete., 
to furnish the new wing which is about to be opened for patients. 
They have made and repaired all needed wearing apparel for the ia* 
mates of the house, both male and female ; and have prepared ma- 
terials for fifty yards of carpeting. In addition to this, they have 
within the last few months, manufactured for sale, various useful aad 
fancy articles, amounting in value to the sum of forty dollars. 

With the aid of an additional number of patients, which is soon to 
come under our care, it is believed that, during the coming year,, 
the ladies by the industry of their own hands, will be able to refund 
to your board, (should you see proper thus to appropriate the pro* 
ceeds of their labor,) nearly the entire amount paid for the carriage 
which was purchased for the use of the patients generally, but more 
especially for the benefit of the females. 



LIBRARY AND NEWSPAPERS. 

ACKirOWI.EDflMBNTS. 

A.bout one hundred volumes of well selected miscellaneous roadmg 
matter have been collected, partly by purchase, and partly by dona- 
tions from various individuals, for the use of the household. These 
books have been read by many of our patients with pleasure and 
profit. It is believed that some of our citizens in vari9us parts of the 
state, will continue to contribute, from timo to time, such volumes as 
they possess which are of little or no value to tbmn, but which would 
add materially to the value of the library of a public institution like 
this. 



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261 



The Newspaper press generallyy throughout the State, has been 
Tery kind and liberal in supplying us with a lai^ amount of valua- 
ble reading. The following papers and periodicals have been re- 
ceived during the year; for which, we are under many and sincere 
obligations: 



Family Viaiton 

Indiana State Sentinel, 

Indiana State Journal, 

The Locomotive, 

Indiana Statesman, 

Uecatar Clarion, 

Wayne Gountv Whig« 

Richmond Palladium, 

Democratic Pharos, 

Indiana American, 

New Albany Ledger, 

Greenfield Spectator, 

Wabash Weekly Gazette, 

Ft. Wayne Times* 

Madison Weekly Courier, 

St Joseph Valley Register, 

The Wabash Atlas, 

Montgomery Journal, 

Democratic Clarion, 

The People's Friend, 

The Democratic Ago, 

Danville Weekly Advertiser, 

White River Slandanl, 

Christian Record, 

The La Fayette Courier, 

The Ft. Wayne Sentinel, 

lad. Tribune & Monroe Farmer, 

Perrysvilie Eagle, 

Harrison Gazette, 

The Indiana Palladium, 



Indianapolis. 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Greensburg, 
Gentrevflt^ 
Richmond, 
Logansport, 
Brookville, 
New Albany, 
Greenfield, 
Wabasbtowii, 
Ft, Wayne, 
Madison, 
South Bend, 
Wabash, 
Crawfordtville, 
Princeton, 
Covington, 
Huntineton, 
Danville, 
Bedford, 
Bloomii^oa, 
La Fayette, 
Ft. Wayne, 
Bloomingtoni 
PerrysviUe, 
Corydon, 
Vevay, 



We have also received the following favors from abroad, to the 
liters of which, we send many thanks and kind greetings: 



Olire Branch, 

Western Christian Advocate, 
Ladies' Repositoy, 
Christian Apolofpst, 
American Messengpr, 
Methodist Expositor, 
Spirit of the Lakes, 
Pennsylvania IntelRgencer, 



Boston, Mass. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

do 

do 

do 
Louisville, Ky. 
Sandusky City, Ohio. 
Harrisborgh, Fn. 



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In addition to all these, we have received donations from various 
sources, as follows: Some beautiful specimens ot geodps (rotn Profess- 
or D. L. McGugin, M. D., of Keokuk, Iowa— a copy of the Presi- 
dent's Message and accompanying documents, from the Hon. 6. N. 
Fitch, M. C. — two volumes of the Gospel Messenger, from the Rev. 
J. L. Harrison, Norwich, N« Y. — valuable varieties of garden seeds, 
and a copy of Patent Office Reports from the Hon. Wm. J. Brown, 
M. C. — several fine engravings, and four copies of the Bible, from 
James Blake, Esq., Indianapolis — Public documents, and some choice 
garden seeds, from the Hon. James Whitcomb, M. G. — ^Bibies and 
other books, pamphlets, engravings, flower seeds, and a valuable col- 
lection of odds and ends, for fancy work, from Miss D. L. Dix — one 
set Malcom's Travels, German Testament, tracts and papers, from 
Susanna Clark, Cincionati, 0., — copies of various public speeches from 
Hon. G. M. Fitch, M* C. — one set of Hutchinson's History of Massa- 
chusetts — Playfiair's Euclid, Biography of Henry Clay, Pathology of 
Drunkenness, and some improved patent gate latches, from Theodorick 
Brooks, of South Bend — books from. Jas. M. L. Bradshnw — one copy 
of Lives of Signers of the Declaration of Independence — and ^ne 
volume of Pictorial Library, from Jesse Morris, of Rush county — ^the 
use of the Central Plank Road, free of toll from the Directors of the 
company — and for a Concert of Instrumental and Vocal Music for 
the benefit of our patients, from the pupils of the Ind. Inst, for the 
Blind. I desire, through you, to express my gratitude for all these 
manifestations of Interest in the welfare of those committed to oar 
care. 

To the members of your Board who have watched the trust com- 
mitted to you with the view of securing its greatest usefulness, I 
desire to express my sense of obligation for important counsels and 
advice. 

To those more immediately associated with me in carrying out the 
designs of thejnstitution, I feel grateful for their unceasing and in* 
dispensable aid. It is only by an equable division of labor and res- 
ponsibility among conscientious, and efficient individuals, that the 
various departments of an extensive hospital can be successfully con* 
ducted. I cannot but believe that we have endeavcNred, to the extent 
of our ability, to do good to those committed to our care. Their so- 
ciety has been, for the most part, our society, and we have sought to 
make their sorrows our sorrows, and their joys our joys. Their reas- 



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S63 

lable i^ants have been supplied, their comforts and welfare have 
den T^arded ; and we only regret the dreadful necessity which 
'xy'wds our wards with human beings, trembling upon the verge of 
lental deaths and that we have not been able to do more to mitigate 

leir UQtoId sorrows. 

RICHARD J. PATTERSON. 
IffDiAif A Hospital for tiik Insanb, ) 
iKoiAMArouSy 31st Oct., 1850. ) 



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>oc. No. 14.] [Part. 1. 



MEMORIAL ' 



OF TUB 



lADISON AND INDIANAPOLIS 



RAIL ROAD COMPANY, 



TO THX 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



OF THB 



STATE OP INDIANA. 



JANUARY, 1851. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 
J. P. OBAPMAVt STATl PRIRTIB. 

1851. 
1D38 



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MEMORIAL. 



To the General AMsenMy of the Siaie of Indiana: 

The Memorial of the Madison aad Indianapolis Rail Road Com* 
pany respeotfiilly shows to your Honorable body: 

That by the first section of the act entitled «*An Act for the con- 
tinaance of the construction of all or any part of the public works 
of this State, by private companieSt and for abolishing the Board of 
Internal Improvement, and the offices of Fund CJommissioner and 
Chief Engineer,** approved January 28, 1842, (and under which act 
the Madison and Indianapolis Railroad Company was formed,) the 
State of Indiana ^^surrendered and granted** to said Comjpany, as an 
entire donation, in consideration of the completion of tne road, all 
the then unfinished portions of said road, ^^with all and singular the 
rights of way, fixtures, and other appendages, including depots and 
lands held by the State, and all the privileges of constructing** said 
portions of road, and receiving freight thereon, as well as the re- 
mainder of said line. The portion of the road upon which the labor, 
materials, dec., so donated had been expended, was that lying between 
what was termed Grifiith*s Depot, near the 2Sth mile post, and the 
town of Edinburgh. 

Your Memorialist further shows, that by the 57th section of said' 
Act the State of Indiana reserved to itself, until the year 1846, a part 
of the net receipts upon said finished portion of said road equal to 
the net receipts thereon for the year 1841; which receipts, amount- 
ing to the sum of eleven hundred and fifty-two dollars per annum, 
have been regularly appropriated and set apart to said State in the 
Stock of said company. Said section further provides that after the 
year 1846 the Sute shall ««be entitled to a full share in all the said 
net receipts, in proportion as the length of the work done by the 
State, as equitably measured, shall bear to the work when com- 
pleted.** Both of these provisions were afterwards, by an amendatory 
Act, approved January 13, 1845, extended to, and made eflfective, 
after the year 1853, so that the State at this time continues to re- 
vive in Stock, an amount equal to the net receipts of 1841, and 



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268 

boUb a contingent interest after 1853, unless purchased by the Com- 
panyy of such portions of the then net proceeds as the finished por- 
tion of the road will bear to the whole line completed. 

Your memorialbt further shows that by the 55th section of the 
original Act, the right is given to the Company to purdiasoy at any 
time, the part of said road completed by the State, by depositing 
with the Treasurer of State an amount in state bonds equal to the 
amount which has been expended upon said work. This provisioD 
your memorialist believes and avers, when taken in connection with 
the first section of said act, and the act of 1845, refers to the amount 
that had been expended by the State on the finished portion of said 
road; for all labor done, materials furnished, &€., upon the unfinished 
portions were granted, — donated, — to the Company, as an induce- 
ment to the completion of the work; and it cannot be that the State 
intended, after holding out this inducement, to reserve, by the loess 
wording of a subsequent section, and afterwards take back its 
'^gWit,'' when the Company should have socceeded in accomplishing 
the purpose of that grant, by the completion of said road. 

By the 58th section of the said Act, the company is in like man- 
ner authorized to purchase any portion of the interest reserved by 
the State after 1853, in the finished part of said road, by paying 
therefor, in State bonds as aforesaid, as your memorialist constraes 
said section, such sum as was expended by the State in the constrac- 
tion of that portion of the road that may be so purchased. For in- 
sUuice, the company may purchase that part of the road lying be- 
tween the head of the Madison Plane and Griffith's depot, Ming 
35 81-100 miles, for $898,051 68 in State Bonds, bdng the amonnt ex- 
pended by the State in the construction of that portion of the work, 

l^our memorialist further shows that the amount expended by 
the Slate upon that portion of the road that was completed, whn 
surrendered to the Company, as derived from the proper books and 
vouchers, and furnished by the then Resident Engineer, who made 
the final settlement on said line, is as follows : 

From Madison steam boat landing to head of In- 
clined plane, 2 47- lOOths miles $396,691 44 

From head of Plane to Six Mile Creek, Griffith's De- 
pot, 35 8 l-lOOths mUes, 898,051 68 

Makiogatotal of $1,194,743 12 

Thb does not include some small sums paid for right of way, at one 
or two points, and for Depot grounds at Madison, and head of plane, 
which cannot bjs accurately ascertained; but it is safe to say that 
this will not swell the expenditures of the State to an amount exceed- 
ing $1,200,000. And your memorialist shows that thus iixiiq; the 
amount of purchase money upon the actual basis of the law, and at 
the present market rate of the Bonds of the State, which, are now, 
or soon to become a liability on the part of the State for principal 



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969 

cod lAtarMt, tbd taid purchase of the entire interest of the State can 
be made, by the company) for a small fraction over the sum of Two 
ibndred and forty-fivo Thousand Dollars ; and that even if your 
memorialist should be held to the use, in said purchase, of the origin* 
ml bonds, that then said purchase can be made for the sum of Three 
Hnndred and Twenty-Three Thousand Dollars. 

Your memorialist represents to your Honorable body, that the 
DirectorB, managing the aflairs of the company, have earlv and 
srteadily contemplated the purchase, before the year 1853, under the 
provisions of the Act aforesaid, of the interest, or a large portion 
thereof, reserved by the State in said road. That the requisite finan- 
cial piovisions have been made, and the company, through its prop- 
er officersand agents, has n^otiated for the control of a large amount 
<A the securities requisite for the purpose, which it has not hitherto 
been the interest of the company to apply, for the reason that the 

that ' 



I are continually accruing intei-est that will be applicable in the 
purchaBe. 

Your memorialist further represents, that it has frequently been 
suggested to the Directors and ofiicers of the company, that the 
State would prefer to dispose, at once, of the contingent interest re- 
sMTed in the road, for a monied consideration, either making the pfo- 
eeeds the nucleus for a sinking fund, for the extinguishment of the 
public debt, or otherwise so investing it as the wisdom of the Legis- 
lature may direct. The reasons assigned for this suggestion are : 

1st. That the State has already made provisions for her public 
debt, by which only a portion thereof is imposed as a burthen, in the 
fomi of taxation, upon the people ; while the remainder is thrown 
for redemption upon her leading public work. 

Snd. That in the event this payment is made with the original 
Bonds, the State vrill only, with the f 1,300,000 surrendered, have 
redeemed $600,000 of the debt actually bearing upon the people; 
tvhUe the interest acquired in the remainder will be so distant and 
centiacent, as scarcely to be entitled to consideration, as a relief of 
the public burthens. 

8d. That supposing the purchase to be made at a medium between 
tbe two sums named, say at $300,000, a careful calculation will 
show that this sum invested as a sinking fund in the State 5 percent. 
Slodu, at a fraction over the present ruling rates, say 70 cents on 
the dollar, and those stocks held by the State, and the interest there- 
on fonded annaally in the same stocks, at par^ will make the State 
the peesessor, in the year 1870, of her own Stocks to the amount of 
tl4l5/«56 53. 

4th. That the same amount invested in like manner in the State 
fives, at 70 cents, and the interest funded annually in the same stocks 
at 75 cents on the dollar, will give a product in 1870, of State Stocks, 
to the amount of $1 ,378,238. 

Sth. That the same sum invested in a productive, dividend paying 



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eight per cent, stock, aod fcmdiog the dividends efttmiUyi imU g^Te.e 
product as sinking fund, in 1870, of $1,198347 76. 
. 6tli. That in scarcely any fo|'m of investment, during the time 
the Bonds of the State have to run, can the State fail to acjquire a 
ffreater sinking fund with the proceeds of such a sale, than aIm will 
derive by the surrender of her bonds, taking only that portion of her 
indebtedness that is not otherwise oroyided for than by tazatioa. 
' Your memorialist would respectmlly represent, thai r^gardinff aoch 
a measure as one of |;ood financial policy on the part of the State, 
looking to the provision already made for a large portion of the 
public mdebtedness, and as bringing the product of the sale into the 
possession of the State for investment,— as also si means of adjust- 
ment that will be attended with less trouble and inconvenience to 
the company, whose present engagements, made from necessity, in 
anticipation of other results, can he disposed of without pecuniary 
loss ; — your memorialist would prefer to accede to such a proposition 
on the part of the State, provided the same should not too greatly 
exceed the amount for which the purchase of the State's intereet, u 
herein shown, can be made in the manner provided by law. 

Your memorialist has sought to make a perfectly frank and true 
statement of the position which its own interests occupy towards 
those of the State. While respectfully responding to the sugmstioos 
that have been made touching these matters, and requestinguat this 
change in the form of consideration may be made, your memorialist 
desires to be distinctlv understood as not seekbff any pecuniary ad- 
vantage for itself at the expense of the State. On the contrary your 
memorialist, by the full statement herein made, has sought to mamfi^st 
its entire readiness to yield to the State a consideration for its con- 
tingent interest as full and ample, and rather exceeding ihan falliiw 
below it, as a purchase of that interest will require of the company 
in the legal form. It is equally proper, in the same spirit of frank- 
ness, for your memorialist to say, in the most respectful manner, that 
if the State does not desire to change the form of this consideration, 
the company, following its early and steady policy in this particular, 
must at once proceed to divest that interest, either whollv or to a 
material extent, in the manner it has heretofore contemplated, and 
reserved to it by law. 

Your memorialist shows, however, that in the construction of that 
part of the road finished by the State, the termination at Madison 
was made over an inclined plane. That upon this plane the Comps- 
ny, by the introduction of new and valuable machinery, as well for 
the safety of the public, as the rapid and safe transit of freight, has 
already expended over sixty thousand dollars, only to find that with 
all its expenditures and improvements, the now heavy and constant- 
ly accumulating business of the road cannot be passied, in reasona- 
ble time, and with corresponding labor and expense, over this imped' 
iment. Your memorialist has, therefore, no resort but to proceed, 
at an early day, to the construction of a new line of road deflecting 



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271 

from the present line some seven or eight miles north, and termina- 
tiog in the city of Madisony by a grade adapted to ordinary locomo- 
tive power* at a cost, as the surveys and estimates show, of about 
$250,000. It is therefore respectfully suggested that in the purchase, 
by your memorialist, of the continffeut interest reserved by the 
State, it will be but just and equitable for the State to deduct from 
the amount expended on such finished portion, such sum as it will 
cost to construct such new line at the southern termination; or to 
abate from the length of line so finished, and forming the basis of 
calculation, that portion which may remain south of the point of 
mtersection of said new line, and for which said new line will be sub- 
stitoted« The latter may with the more propriety be done, as, by 
the close of the present season, the whole of said road that will re- 
main south of said point of intersection will have been rebuilt by the 
company. 

The prayer of your memorialist therefore is that your Honorable 
body, if disposed to change the form of consideration for the pur- 
chase, by the company, of said contingent interest, will so provide 
by law; fixing such an amount as will enable the company, to eom- 
ply widi the views of the State, without, as compared with its ability 
to purchase in the other form, too great a pecuniary sacrifice ; and 
that, in either event, a deduction may be made, upon just and equit- 
able premises, either from the original cost of the portion finished 
by the State, or from length of line, equal to the expenditure which 
taeooBipany must be compelled to make, in order to avoid the plane 
constructed by the State. 
And your memorialist as in duty bound, dec. 
ij order of the Board of Directors of the Madbon and Indian- 
apohs Rail Road Ciompany. 

JNO. BROUGH, 

Prerideni. 
Office Madison & Indianapolis R. R. Company, ) 
Madisoii, January 21st, 1851. ) 



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Doc.Jifo. 16.] [Part. I . 

REPORT 



OPTRX 



STATE BANK OF INDIANA. 



TO THB 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 
J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 
1851. 
1D39 



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REPORT. 



State Bank of Indiana, ) 
Indianapolis, 3d Jan., 1851. ) 

To the General Assembly of the State of Indiana: 

In compliance with the requirements of the '< Act establishing a 
State BanK/' I have the honor herewith to lay before the General 
Assembly, a report of the condition of the Bank, and each of its 
Branches, on the 3d Saturday of November last. 

The aggregate of the dividend in all the branches for the past 
year, was 10 per cent, on the capital stock; and over and beyond 
whicli, there was carried to the Surplus •Fund, $142,685 46. 

The dividends declared were as follows, viz.: 

To the Branches at Indianapolis, Lawrenceburgh, Richmond, 
Madison, New Albany, Terre Haute, Lafayette, Port Wayne and 
Michigan City, each 11 per cent. 

To the Branch at Evansville, 10 per cent 

To the Branch at Yincennes, 9i per cent. 

To the Branches at Bedford and South Bend, each 6 per cent. 

The suspended debt has been reduced $53,569 92. 

The circulation of the Bank exceeds the amount stated in the last 
annual report, $118,185, being, however, less than the amount car- 
ried to the Surplus Fund. 

Very Respectfully, 

J. MORRISON, Preset. 



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277 

STATEMENT OF THE STATE BANK OP INDIANA, 

NOVEMBER 16, 1850. 

V KESOCRCES. 

Notes discounted, $1,709,935 38 

Bills of exchange, 2,414,951 06 

$4,124,886 44 

Suspended Debt, 270,213 77 

Banking Houses and Furniture, 175,610 22 

Other Real Estate, 188,623 32 

634,447 31 

Funds in the Eastern Cities, 449,153 09 

Dae from Banks other than Eastern,- 14S,S61 17 
Remittances and other Resources,- • • • 247,048 01 

Indiana Treasury Notes, 108,485 00 

953,547 27 

Notes of other Banks, 224,842 00 

Gold and Silver, 1,197,880 58 

1,422,722 58 

$7,135,603 60 



LIABIMTIBS. 

Capital Stock of the State of Indiana, 

under the charter, $880,000 00 

From investments of the Sinking Fund, 120,888 00 
From Bank Tax and Saline Fund,- • • 5,716 27 

4 

$1,006,604 27 

Capital Stock of Individuals, 1,076,346 32 

$2,082,950 59 

Surplus Fund, 750,678 17 

Profit and Loss, 97,258 59 

Dividends undrawn, 27,661 91 

Suspended Interest and other Items,- • 34,600 66 

910,199 33 

Due to Banks, 112,175 47 

Branch Balances, 6,168 75 

118,344 22 

Due Commissioners of the Sinking 

Fund, 43,467 83 

Due School Fund for Taxes, 2,763 93 

Due Depositors, 556,432 70 

602,664 46 



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Notei in CSratlatioii» ondar Five IM- 

J^:, $643,53550 ! 

FiTaDolhni and upwards, 2,904,732 00 -, 

, . 3,548^867 50 ^nk 

Uamotes on hand, 126,822 50 a.a 

3/iaS44r- 

»7J35,60t T 

^4 

1 4 

a 2 
c 
C z 

4 4 

9 i 

9 ] 
:i { 
7 ; 

5 ( 

1 : 



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^9 



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1 

?aDk8 ' 


:aa 

3. 


3 

7 


66 - 
47 


1 


45 


7 


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279 

OFFICERS AND COMPENSATION. 

STATE BANK. 

James Morrison, President, $1,500 00 

James M. Ray, Cashier, 1,500 00 

BRANCHES. 

INDIAN APOUS. 

Calvin Fletcher, President, 800 00 

Thomas H. Sharpe, Cashier, 1,600 00 

James P. Southard, Clerk, 800 00 

James Gore, Messenger, 400 00 

Stephen M^ajor, Attorney, 250 00 

LAWRENCEBUKGH. 

Elzey G. Burkam, President, 1,000 00 

Henry K. Hobbs, Cashier, 1,100 00 

Columbus S. Stevenson, Teller, 900 00 

Philip L. Spooner, Attorney, 250 00 

KICHMOND. 

Albert C. Blanchard, President, 700 00 

Elijah Coffin, Cashier, 1,000 00 

Charles F. Coffin, Teller and Clerk, 800 00 

MADISON. 

James F. D. Lanier, President, 500 00 

Joseph M. Moore, Cashier, 2,000 00 

MarkTilton, Teller, 900 00 

George T. Fitzhugh, Book-keeper, 900 00 

William B. Thurston, Discount Clerk, 900 00 

NBW ALBANY. 

James R. Shields, President, ' $1,300 00 

Victor A. Pepin, Cashier, 1,200 00 

Tmiotby D. ^w, Clerk, 700 00 



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2S0 

EVANSVILLE. 



John Mitchell, President, 

George W. Rathbone, Cashier, 1^00 00 

Robert R. Roberts, Clerk, 1,000 00 



VI'NCEN.NES. 



William Burtch, President, 

John Ross, Cashier, •. . 1,200 00 

J. F. Bayard, Jr., Clerk, 300 00 



BEDFORD. 



John Vestal, President, 

Isaac Rector, Cashier, 800 00 

James D. Farmer, Clerk, 400 00 



TERRE HAUTE. 



Curtis Gilbert, President, 700 00 

Joseph S. Jenckes, Cashier, 1,000 00 

William R. McKee, Teller, 400 00 



LAFAYETTE. 



Joseph S. Hanna, President, 

Cyrus Ball, Cashier, 1,000 00 

Austin P. Linn, Teller, 1,000 00 

William W. Devault, Clerk, 300 00 



FORT WAYNE. 



Allen Hamilton, President, 200 00 

Hugh McCulloch, Cashier, 1,200 00 

Melancthon W. Hubbell, Teller and Clerk, 1,000 00 

Stephen B. Bond, Assistant Clerk, 300 00 



SOUTH BEND. 



Samuel C. Sample, President, 1,000 00 

Horatio Chapin, Cashier, 1,200 00 



MICHIGAN CITY. 



Edmund D, Taylor, President, $1,000 00 

Edmund D. Woodson, Cashier, 1,000 00 

Urial C. FoUet, Teller and Book-keeper, 800 00 



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Doc. No. 16.] [Parti. 

REPORT 



OFTHS 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONEBS, 



TO THE 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



OF TBS 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



900 COPIES ORDERED TO BE FRINTBD. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 
P. CHAPMAN. STATE PRINTBR. 

1851. 
1D30 



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f 

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REPORT. 



Sinking Fund Office, ) 
INDIANAFOU89 3d January, 1851. ) 

To the Cteneral Assembly of the State of Indiana: 

The Commissioners of the Sinking Fund respectfully herewith pre- 
sent their annual report of the condition of the Sinking Fund, to 
the 23d December last. 

The statement A, is an exhibit of the receipts and disbursements 
of the Fund, for the past year, up to, and including the date above 
mentioned. 

Statement B, exhibits the whole condition of the Fund on said 
day. 

Within the year, thirty-seven bonds of the State for $1,000 00 
each, issued for the Bank loan, have been purchased. 
Very Respectfully, 

J. MORRISON, ^ 

WILLIAM DAILY, Vcnmmi.snnn^. 

JOHN F. CARR, >^<^^tsst(mers. 
GEORGE HENRY, j 



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985 



[A] 
EXHIBIT 



Of the Income and Appropriations of the Sinking Fundffor the year 
commencing on December 4, 1849, and ending December 23, 1850. 



MEANS AND INCOME. 

Amount of Deposites in the Branches of 

the State Bank ; invested in the year* -$35,796 98 
Received of Principal of Stock 

Loans, $15,207 59 

Received of Principal of other 

Loans, 32,270 88 

$47,478 47 

$83,276 45 

RECEIPTS OF INCOME. 

Dividends on State Stock, in the State 

Bank, $102,621 30 

Interest on Loans, 45,788 77 

Damages on sales of forfeited Lands,- • • • 239 85 

Rents of forfeited lands, 46 00 

: 148,695 92 

$231,971 37 



INVESTMENTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

Indiana Bonds, for Bank Loan,$37,000 00, 
costing, $33,300 00 

Indiana Bonds, (Int Improv.) from Wa- 
bash College, 10,400 00 

Indiana 5 per cent. Scrip, re- 
deemed, $36,500 00 

Interest allowed on the same,- 14,546 51 

51,046 51 

I-oans to the State, and other Dividend 

Loans, 63,262 28 

$158,008 79 



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386 

EXPENDITURE. 

Interest, Exchange and Commission on 

Bank Loan Bonds, $69^86 87 

Loss on sales of forfeit^ lands, • • • - 540 00 

Repayment of Excess of Bids, on sales of 

lands, 72 13 

Distribution of damages, on forfeited lands, 216 73 

Commissioners' services and expenses,- • • • 875 71 

Clerk's and Assistant Clerk's services,* • • • 1,300 00 

Attorney's fees, 100 00 

Printing, |754 67, Less $449 73 repaid,. 304 94 

Rent and all other Expenditures, 666 20 



$73,962 3S 
$231,9713: 



JAMES M. RAY, Clerk. 



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287 



[B] 
CONDITION OF THE SINKING FUND, DECEMBER 23, I850, 



MEANS. 



Bank Stock: 

Stock in the State Bank of Indiana, under 

the charter, $880,000 00 

Stock in the State Bank of Indiana, from 

investments of the Sinking Fund,* • • • 120^80 00 
Stock in the State Bank of Indiana, from 

Saline Fund, 4,924 20 

Stock in the State Bank of Indiana, from 

Bank Tax Fund, 792 07 

$1,006,604 27 

Loans on Mortgage far paying^ Bank Stock : 

In Indianapolis Branch, 6,591 43 

In Lawrenceburgh Branch, 10,363 00 

In Richnumd Branch, 1,680 44 

In Madison Branch, 8,714 56 

In Evansville Branch, 7,276 49 

In Vincennes Branch, 4^270 94 

In Bedford Branch, 4,930 44 

In Terre Haute Branch, 2,744 43 

In Lafayette Branch, 11,164 11 

In Fort Wayne Branch, 5^50 14 



63,387 98 



Loans on other Mortgages: 

Loans to borrowers on roortgaj^es, 329,317 30 

Loans by sales on credit of forfeited 

mortgaged property, 190,188 89 

Loans on Notes, 500 00 

Loans from Dividend, 105,848 30 



555,854 49 



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Balances in Brandies of the State Bank of Indiana : 

Indianapolis Branch, $2,368 18 

Lawrenceburgh Branch, 420 52 

Richmond Branch, 3 38 

Madison Branch, 1,170 34 

Madison Branch for Coupon Fund, 6,180 00 

New Albany Branch, 96 24 

Evansville Branch, 118 07 

Bedford Branch, 20 18 

Michigan City Branch, 1,284 79 



Merchant's Bank, New York, 2,671 24 

Winslow, Lanier, & Co., New York,- • • 1,512 07 
James Morrison, President and Acting 

Treasurer, (Deposited in Bank,) 3,175 18 

Remittance, for Interest, to New York,- 32,813 25 



$11,661 70 



$40,171 74 



State Bonds, for Bank Loan, (purchased,) 84,000 00 i 

Indiana Bonds and Interest, received from ' 

Wabash College, 10,400 00 I 

Sinking Fund Treasury Notes, .... 16,000 00 , 

Disbursements: 

For Interest on State Bonds, issued for 
Bank Capital, under the Charter, 1,012,053 68 

For Interest.on State Bonds, of 1839,. • 589 05 

For Premium on the purchase of Ex- 
change and Interest, 32,154 25 

$1,044,796 98 

To Treasurer of State, Act of January 
29th 1841, 16,773 63^ 

To Treasurer of State, Act of February 

6th, 1841, 59,626 60 

To Fund Commissioners on account of 
Surplus Revenue, 164,465 21 

To Fund Commissioners on account of 

Loan of 1839, • • 2,959 00 

$243,824 44 

For Commission: 

On payment of Interest, in New York,- 4,538 74 
For Expenses of State Loan, for Banking 

purposes, 4,799 14 

For Transportation of Specie, for State 

Bank Capital, 3,391 15 



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289 

For Current Expense, including rent, ad- 
▼ef lisements, salaries, Commissions on 
Loans, &c. from the commencement,* 46,361 OO 
For Engraving, filling and all Expense of 
^ issue of Sinking Fund Treasury Notes, 3,388 47 

For application, of Dividends of Surplus 
Fund of Surplus Revenue Bank Stock, 
to creation of Surplus Revenue Bank 

Stock, 11,302 27 

For application by the Branches of Divi- 
dends to the liquidation of Surplus 

Revenue Bonds, 24,963 60 

For application of Interest and dividend 

to State Bank Stock, 6,700 00 

For contribution to Surplus Fund in 
Branches in investment of Sinking 
Fund Bank Capital, 350 00 

For loss on Sales of forfeited mortgaged 
lands, 

For redemption of Sinking Fund Treasu- 
ry Notes, 506,885 00 

For Interest allowed on Sinking Fund 
Treaiury Notes, < 94,494 24 



$6%428SS 



$43,315 87 
3,338*00 

1^1,3^9 24 



13,787,363 2$ 



For Bonds of the State, issued for Bank 
Capital, under the Charter, 

For Excess of bids on sales of forfeited 
lands on balance due on Loans, 

To State of Indiana, on account of Sur- 
plus Revenue, 108,532 87 

To State of Indiana, on account of Sur- 

f^lus Revenue Bank Stock, applied to 
iquidation of Surplus Revenue Bonds, 6,000 00 
To State of Indiana, for Saline Fund, in- 

vested in Bank Capital, 4,924 20 

To State of Indiana, for Bank Tax Fund, 
invested in Bank Capital,- •« 792 07 



1,390,000 00 
617 14 



$|20|249 14 



1D31 



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290 

Other Sources of Receipts: 

Dividends on Bank Stock (under the char- 
ter,) 1,257,810 02 

Dividends on Surplus Revenue Bank 

Stock, 129,444 30 

Dividends on Bank Stock of 1839, 7,503 66 

Dividends on Bank Stock of 1841, 508 33 

Dividends in Sinking Fund Treasury 

Notes, 29,000 00 

$1,424,266 31 

Interest on Mortgaged Loans, for Bank j 

Stock, 163,55108 I 

Interest on other Loans, 584,618 44 ' 

Interest on State Loans of forfeited lands, 45,603 29 I 

Interest from Dividend Loans, * 8,865 81 i 

Interest from Slate Bonds, 150 00 i 

802,788 62 i 

Premium on State Bonds sold, 29,496 92 i 

Damages on forfeited lands, on sales,* • • • 5,766 91 i 

Rent from forfeited lands, 398 40 \ 

Blank forms of Mortgages, 116 17 

Interest on Coupon Fund, on deposite in i 

Madison Branch, 1,253 35 

Gain in purchase of Sinking Fund Bank 

Stock, 67134 

Gain in purchase of Bank Bonds, 11,295 77 

To Terre Haute Branch, 173 39 

To Lafayette Branch 267 17 

To Fort Wayne Branch, 06 

To South Bend Branch, 2 54 

$443 16 

$3,787,363 23 



JAMES M. RAY, Ckrk 



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Doc. No. 17.] [Part I. 

REPORT 



OF TBB 



COMniE OF WAYS AND MEANS 



TO THB 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



FEBRUARY, 1851. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 
1851. 
1D33 



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REPORT. 



The committee of Ways and Means, whose duty it Is to exiunine 
the books of the offices of the Auditor and Ti-easurer of State, and com* 
pare the books, vouchers, and warrants in said offices, prepare a state- 
ment of the receipts and expenditures at the Treasury; to examine the 
report of the Trustees of the Wabash and Erie Canal, and compare 
the vouchers and warrants with said report, and to examine into the 
financial aflfairs of the State generally, submit the following report; 

The committee have made a thorough examination of the booka 
of said officers, and found the vouchers of receipts at the treasury^ 
and warrants on the treasury correctly audited and properly filed. 

All warrants upon the treasury have been punctually paid whea 
presented. The committee would remark that during their exami- 
nations, aforesaid, every facility was afforded them by the incum- 
bents of those offices for a speedy and faithful dischaige of their 
duty. 

From the examination of the committee into the condition of the 
treasury, it appears that there was a deficiency in the treasury on 
the 31st day of October, 1850, of $78,621 07. A sUtement of the 
receipts and expenditures showing said deficiency b herewith sub- 
mitteid as a part of this report, and marked statement A. 

It became the duty of the committee to count, mutilate and 
destroy a considerable amount of scrip of various kinds, which had 
been redeemed at the treasury, and cancelled during the year. This 
duty they discharged, and now show the following abstract of the 
scrip so destroyed : 
Of six per cent. Treasury Notes ; 

Principal, $64,755 00 

Interest, 35,414 76 

$100,160 76 
Of Bank Scrip, five per cent.; 

Principal, ^ $73335 00 

Interest,*.-... 27,142 18 

$99,477 18 



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296 

Of quarter per cent. Treasury Notes; 

Principal, $3,400 00 

Interest, 61 92 

$3,461 92 
Of Wabash and Erie Canal Scrip, east ; 

Principal, $13,000 27 

Interest, •' • • 3.611 03 

$16,611 30 
Of Wabash and Erie Canal Scrip, west ; 

Principal, >$9 »,491 OP 

Making of State liabilities counted and destroyed by tfie com- 
mittee, the sum of $t»i2,2IO 16. 

The committee deem it neeessery to suggest that in therr opinion 
the present mode of as:sessing is very im{)erfect/and the duties de- 
volving on the assessors are scarcely ever executed with that diih 
gpence, care and tmpartiaKty which the lAw and the people have a 
ri^ht to expect and ifemand. A large amount of the* rn visible wealth 
ot the State has for }"ears entirely escaped taxntion, thereby making 
Ihe burdens of taxation rest the heavier epon the farming inter^t. 
The valuation of the land is unjust and unequal. To remedy 
Irhfch, so far as the time of the committee, and pressure of the 
business of the session would allow, a bill has been drawn mp and 
submitted to the House, for the more effectual, just and equal assess- 
ment of the personal property, and also another bill for the resp- 
praisement of the real estate, and to make the value thereof equal 
ifDd uniform throughout the State, has been presented. 

The committee rejoice that they have it in their power to say te 
fhe country that both of those bills have received the approval of 
both branches of the General Assembly, and are now the laws of 
the land. 

The committee are of the opinion that if the said laws are en- 
forced, there will be added to the list of taxables in the State from 
fifty to seventy millions of property. 

The committee, in view of the increased anu^unt of taxable pro- 
perty that will be placed upon the tax list, have reduced the rate of 
taxes for State purposes proper to twenty-five cents on each one 
hundred dollars' worth in value of all property in the State, and a 
poll tax of fifty cents upon each poll. 

. Upon the recommendation of the Chairman of the committee on 
fllkt Benevolent and Scientific Institutions, the committee have in- 
•creased the tax for the Institute for the education of the Blind one 
•half cent; and the bill to raise revenue for ISSl was reported ac- 
4K)rdTngly to the House of Representatives. 

To enable the people to understand the true condition of the for- 



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tet MitMit lh« itetemetit marked B, and tnada a part hereof. 

In pursuance of the provisions of law, the committee have efam« 
ined the report of the Trustees of the Wabash and Erie Canal, and 
compared the vouchers and warrants with the report, aiid submit 
the folio wiDg report : 

They find the vouchers to be correct, with the foltowing tfx<»p* 
tons: There are no vouchers for the last year's salary ol Thbmas 
H. Blake, the resident trustee on the part of the bondholders. Th^ 
Gommittee are ot the opinion thai he received the money as stated 
\n the report, but died without filing the proper voi^chers. The 
trustees obtaine;! a credit for two hundred dollars for money paid fo 

, when the voucher is only for one hundred dollars. 

The amoynt e^aimed in the report as money paid to ' ' '" « ■ ' ■ < ■ ' " ' ■ 
is $" more than the voucher is. It is presumed the^ mistflfkwr 
are purely accidental. 

The connniittee foel eonstrained, from a sense of duty, to c^pfaia 
their decided and strong disapprobation of the loose and caMi^li!^ 
iMnner the trustees have adopted in paying out monev. The of»ly 
voeeher that is produced for about one hundred and ttftf thousand 
doHtn, is the certificate of the clerk of the board ^f tf ilsteM, M 
oScsr appointed by the trustees, and responsible only to ihem. 

The committee cannot regard his certificate in aH^y ether light 
tiian as the certificate of the trustees fhen^selves. 

When money is paid to superintendents or eenetructing age&ie^ 
their voucher should be taken. 

The statement herewith sut>mitted and icarked C, will fully exhibit 
the condition of the said canal. 

Id aooordimee with the suggestions of the Auditor of State, tfnA 
io coQipliance with a xe^fohitiun of the House^ the Oooiaiilttee have 
made such examination of the alleged over-i sue of quarter per cent. 
treasury notes as their limited. lime and numerous duties would per* 
mit, and have concluded to submit the following statement of facts: 
Under the provisions of an act approved January 31, 1842, page 
1S2, general laws of 1843, the Auditer and Treasurer of State were 
authorized to prepare an amount of treasury notes bearing one q^uar- 
ter of one per cent, interest not exceeding five hundred tht)qstfnd 
<\o)lars, the object of which issue was the redemption of filty dollar 
six per cents. The amount prepared for circulation in accordance 
^ith this act and receipted for by tbe Treasurer of State, George H. 
Dunn, Esq., was seventy thousand dollars, numbering from 1 to 
14,000, and was receipted for by him as such treasurer receipts, No. 
^> dated March 3, 1842, for $50,000, and No. 1080, daced Ocfo* 
oer 31, 1842, for $20,000. in the report of the Treasurer of No- 
jmber Sd, 1843, he mentions the receipt of the seventy thocMind 
<>^llars, and states that he had used of these funfds in the rsriMvptioti 
^^, the sum of $41,250, leaving in his hands the tfutii ef $88,750, 
^oh was kept in original paonges, tranaferrM by Mr* Duoti 



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t0 Mr. Mayhewi and by Mr. Mayhew to Mr. Hannah, and was 
finally destroyed by the committee of Ways and Means in January 
1848. 

The whole sum redeemed and destroyed of these treasury notes is 
« follows : , 

In January, 1848, $28,750 00 

In January, 1849, 31,565 00 

In January, 1850, 12,165 OU 

Destroyed by present committee, 3,361 92 

Making in all the sum of, $75,941 92 

or $5^41 92 more than the amount reported as issued. The con* 
onittee also find on examination of the register, thnt ab(tut the amount 
of this excess has been received of duplicate numbers, several of 
these duplicate hills were in the hands oi the Treasurer, and all had 
•very appearance of being genuine. 

So long a time has elapsed since the issue of these notes and the 
transactions therewith connected, that the committee deem it impos* 
sible to throw any more light upon the subject, than simply to report 
a loss to the State of some six. thousand dollars, in addition to the 
amount yet to be redeemed; but the committee i^ave no means 
either of fixing the transaction, or a shadow of suspicion upon any 
particular individual. 

SIAIEMEirT A. 

A GENERAL STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EX- 
PENDITURES DURING THE FINANCIL YEAR, 1850. 

HECEIPTS. 

Balance remaining in the treasury at the close of the 
last fiscal year, October 31, 1849, $428,941 19 

The fdlowinfiT sums were received during the financial year which 
closed October 31, 1850, to- wit: 



REVEinnB. 

On account ^f revenue of 1843, $223 80 

On account of revenue of 1846, 557 61 

On account of revenue of 1847, 100 00 

On account of revenue of 1848, delinquent, 35,367 17 

On account of revenue of 1849, 415,114 59 

On account of revenue of 1850,. • 4,102 33 

On accotmt of revenue of 1849, delinquent, 165 53 



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199 



raiVXBSITT FVICD.' 



Ott fl6a)unt of loans refunded, « 4,730 69 

On account of sales of land, principal, 129 61 

On account of sales of land, interest, 383 91 

On account of interest on loans, 4,230 92 

On account of advertising refunded, 2 00 



BANK TAX FUND. 



On account of loans refunded, |395 00 

On account of interest on. loans,* * • •.•' 516 54 

On account of. State Bank assessment, * 1,073 65 



SURPLUS BEVKNUB FUND. 



On account of Joans refunded, 1,283 45 

On account of iaterest on loans, 515 3ft 



SALINE FUND. 



On account of loans refunded, 1,804 89 

On account ot interest on loans,. 1,488 83 

On account of damages on forfeited land, 19 00 

On account of sales of saline lands, principal, 1,375 08 

On account of sales of saline lands, interest, 311 65 



CONOBBSSIONAL TOWNSHIP FUND. 



On account of loads refonded, 73 00 

On account of interest on loans, - 101 75 



TBBASURT FtTND. 

On account of interest on loans, « . * r • ^ 35 4f 

COMMON SCHOOL FUND. 

On account of profits of State Bank, $55,863 00 



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inmAVATmuM 
On Attcoeatof^alasoflots,* MI 95 

HOSPITAL FOR THE Ilfa^JIJB. 

On account of sales of lots, • • 699 97 

On account of loan from Bank, • 13,000 00 

DBAP AND DUMB ASTLVll. 

Ott aocount of loan from Bank, • •• 1,476 50 

Madison and Indianapolis Railroad, I,IS9 M 

«rAi«*0 nuson. 

On aceoont of sale of old prison, lOt M 

On account of rent of prison, * MM88 9 

On account of fees refunded, * • 2 50 

RORTHBRN DIVISION OF CBNTRAL CANAJU 

P<a fWf^^int of water rents, 55,16? W 

LAWJWVCEPUMH AND IRDKAIIJlMUS RAlMOAO* 

On account of loan to company, $3,061 96 

NIBW ALBANY. AND YIN^CW^QCm RCMLD. 

On account of tolls, $13,631 97 

ESTATES WITHOUT HSIB8. 

On account of estates without heirs, $200 89 

RSVISBD STATUTES. 

On nccDunt of sales of, $6S 55 



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SOI 



WABABH AKO EBIB OANAL BT TEVtmS. 

On account of tolls and water rents, - $252,473 01 

On account of subscription by bondholders, 407,850 00 

On account oF canal lands east and west of Tippecanoe, 56-,635 32 

On account of canal lands, Vincennes district, 75,422 56 

On account of interest and exchange, 25,1 14 81 

On account of error in disbursement:*, 553 00 

On account of Canal Scrip west of Tippecanoe, 22,490 00 

On account of Canal Scrip east, principal, 12,999 SB' 

On account of Canal Scrip east, interest, 3,611 03 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

On account of public printing refunded, $316^ 00 

On account of miscellaneous items, 100 67 

On account of sispended debt, 50 00 

On account of insurance tax, 116 00 

Total amount of receipts from Nov. Ist, 1849, to 

Oct. 31, 1850, inclusive, $1,432,442 78 

Add balance in Treasury Nov. 1, 1849, 428,941 19 

Grand total of receipts, $1,861,383 97 



EXPENDITURES. 

There were credited during the financial year ending October 
Slst, 1850, the following sums, to*wit : 



ORDm ARY BXPBlfSSa^ 

On account of Probate Judges, -. . $4^95 00 

On account of Supreme and Circuit Judges, 14,910 81 

On account of State House, 588 71 

On account of specific appropriations, 3,114 29 

On account of public printing, paper and binding, 11,522 49 

On account of Legislative expenses, 31,010 64 

On account of State Library, 964 81 

On account of the Militia, • 539 17 

On account of staii«>nery and fuel, 2,453 13 

On account of Contingent Fund, to-wit: 
To Jas. Hughes, attorney in the McGinley case, $400 00 
1D33 



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an 

To Walpole & Quarles, attorneys in the Mc- 

Ginley case, 400 00 

To Samuel H. Buskirk, nrbitiator, 1U5 75 

Transcript of McGinley case, 95 50 

Postage account, 272 38 

Sundry allowances by Gov. Wright, • • 491 67 

$1,765 30 

On account of Governor's Circle. • • 525 34 

On account of Governor's House, 1,309 56 

Oo account of I'ransportaiion ot uublic arms, 79 75 

On account of State's Pri.son, • • •' 3,606 63 

On account of distributing Laws and Journals, 551 54 



FUBUC DBBT. 

On account of interest for January and July,* ••••••• $188,595 00 

On account of salary and expenses of agency to clo>e 

of Collins' term. 5,911 27 

On account of salary o( agent, Col. May, 1,434 93 

On account of expenses of agency, 149 66 



TEEASCRT KOTEfl* 

On account of five per cent, cancelledi $46,410 00 

On account of interest on same, 16,150 6S 

On account of six per cent, cancelled, 86,000 (M 

On account of interest on same, 43,067 35 

On account of quarter per cent, cancelled, 12,165 00 

On account of interest on same, 202 75 

On iiccouQt of incidental' expenses of, -^ • • • • Sii 00 



UlflVERSITY FUND. 

On account of Loans, $10,074 00 

On account of interest refunded, • 28* 00 

On account of damages on sales of lands, 378 14 

On account of expenses of fund, • 252 SS 

On account of piofessors' salaries, * 3,700 00 



bn account of damages, $431 OS 

On account of distribution of fund» 6,708 80 



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i 



am 



On aoooQiit of purchase of Bank Stock, 550 W 

Qa aopuunt of expenses of fund, 75 85 



BANK TAX FOHD. 



On account of distribution of fund, • $3,583 18 

On account of damages, 41 78 



Sta^LUS BEVENITE FCXD. 



On account of loans, ♦ $500 00 

On account of diitribution, 343 OS 



COXORE88IONAL TOWNSHIP FUND. 



On account of loans, $253 34 

On account oi fund distributed, * 5? 30 



TBBASUBT FVNO. 

On account of damages on loans, *• • • -fSS M 

CBNTBAL CANAL, NOBTHEftN OIvisiON. 

On nocount of repairs, ^' ••? »^ ^ 

On aocoaat of incidental expenses, If005 58 

NBW AUAJIT AN0 TINCBNNBS BOAD. 

On account of construction, #3,198 03 

On aoconol of repairs, • • S*^ >o o 

On account of contingent expenses, • 2,328 85 

pa aceoani of daipages, ! • • • : J ^ 

xiaoBX&Ajnoua* 

0*1 account of estates without heirs,- •• •• $292 81 

On account of new Slate's Prison, • • • 12»935 90 

Oa account of Madison and Indianapolis Railroad Stockr 8,012 33 
On account of interest on State Bonds, • 75 00 



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304 

On account of revenue refundedt 1^550 69 

On account of Constitutional Convention* 1,014 48 

On account of W. and E. Canal, 613 50 



BBNEVOUSirr CfSTZTVTIOirS. 



On account of Deaf and Dumb Asylum, • • $27,979 9S 

On account of Blind Asylum, • • • • 11,781 09 

On account of Insane Hospital, 32,501 33 

On account of Superintendent of Insane Hospital,* • • 1,500 00 



JXFFERSONVILLB AHD CRAWFORDSVILLB ROAD. 



On account of construction, 16,000 Ofl 

^On account of incidental expenses, ....•..*.-..•.• 722 00 



"W ABASH AND ERIE CANAL BT TRUSTEES* 



'On account of general expenses of trustees, 128,675 65 

On account of expenses of land office, in the Vin- 

cennes district, 1,668 24 

On account of land office east and west of Tippeca- 
noe, 4,192 69 

On account of ordinary repairs, 54,871 74 

On account of extraordinaiy repairs, ^ 35,255 29 

On account of surveys and locating, 20,396 48 

On account of construction, Coal Creek to Terre 

Haute, 75,634 38 

On account of construction, Terre Haute to Point 

Conjmerce, • 184,213 07 

On account of construction from Point Commerce to 

Newberry, 120,209 87 

■'On account of construction from Newberry to Mays* 

ville, 71,550 25 

On account of construction south of Maysville, 151,444 96 

On account of damages and water power, 6,780 50 

On account of Superintendence, 9,149 17 

On account of expense of collection, 7,543 50 

On account of interest to bondholders, • -53,409 68 



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SOS 



WABASH AND ERIE CANAL SCRIP. 



On account or incidental expenses, scrip east, 45 00 

On account of incidental expenses, scrip west, 27 00 

On account of scrip east, principal cancelled, 25,453 01 

On account of scrip east, interest cancelled, 6,056 70 

On account of scrip west, cancelled, 15,845 00 

Whole amount audited during financial year 1850, 

warrants No. 4154 to No. 5202, inclusive, 1,513,534 04 



\ RECAPITULATION. 

Balance in the treasury October 31, 1849, $428,941 19 

Receipts for the year 1850, 1,432,442 78 

1,861,383 97 
Deduct warrants as above,* • 1,513,534 04 

Balance in the treasury October 31, 1851, 347,849 93 

This however is but an apparent ballance, there being really a 
small deficiency at the end of the financial year. 

The receipts and expenditures of the Wabash and Erie Canal 
Trustees, under the act for the adjustment of the State debt, are 
semi-annually reported to the office of the Auditor of State, and the 
receipts credited and expenditures charged, in the general financial 
account, as if actually paid into the treasury. The account is ren- 
dered to the 1st October, 1850, at which time there was an excess 
of receipts to the credit of the trustees, amounting to $194,910 09, 
and which is to be deducted from the balance stated above. The 
amount of treasury notes, and Wabash and Erie Canal scrip, in the 
treasury for cancellation, and the indebtedness of the Slate to the 
State Bank to meet the July interest and the expense of the Con- 
stitutional Convention, are also to be charged against the treasury. 

The true condition of the treasury at the period named will be 
fooad not to vary materially from the following statement: 
Balance in the treasury to credit of Wabash and Erie 

Canal Trustees, $194,910 09 

Treasury notes on hand for cancellation, 192,460 00 

Wabash and Erie Canal scrip for cancellation, 39,100 91 

Total chaises on treasury, 426,471 00 

Deduct balance above stated, 347,849 93 

Leaving a deficiency in the treasury at the close of 
the fiscal year of about» 78,621 07 



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8TAIEMEHT B. 
STATE DEBT. 

FORBION 8TATB DEBT. 

Bonds issued for Internal Improvement System, $8,900,000 

Bonds issued lor Wabash and Erie Canal, 1,7^7,000 

Bonds issued for State Bank of Indi ma, 2»4I3'^ 

Bonds issued for 4th instalment Surplus Revenue,* • • . 294,0()0 

Bonds issued for Madison and Indianapolis Railroad,- 456,UU0 
Bonds issued for Lawrenceburgh and Indianapolis 

Railroad, 221,000 

Bonds, 7 per cent., issued to pay interest on Bonds». • 1,100,000 

Making a total amount issued, $15,1 1 1,000 

BOlfDS REDEEMED AND CANCELLED. 

Surplus Revenue Bonds, 294,000 

Lawrenceburgh and Indianapolis Railroad Bonds,- • • 189,000 

Internal Improvement Bonds, 436,000 

Irregular Bonds cancelled as not sold, 700,000 

Totol redeemed and cancelled, f 1 ,609,900 

Add for bonds on which the Bank pays interest and is 

toredeem principal, • 1,390,000 

Add for 7 per cent, bonds issued but never sold, 1,064,000 

Making a total of, $4,063,000 

The whole amount issued as above, is 15,1 1 1,000 

Total amount of bonds outstanding prior to surrunder, 

under State debt arrangement with holders, $11,048,000 



BONDS 8I7BRENDBBBD. 

Wabash and Erie Caned B4mds. 

678 Bonds surrendered by subscribers prior to July 

1st. 1847, $678,000 

277 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribei^s prior to Ju- 
ly 1st, 1647, 277,000 

164 Bonds surrendered by subscribers to January Ist, 
1848 : 165,000 



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tn 

54 Bonds surrendered hy nm-tubterUerf to Jan. 1st, 

1848, 54.000 

41 Bonds surrendered by noH-sttb»criber$ to July Ist, 

1848, 41,000 

8 Bonds surrendered by mm-tubieribert to July 1st, 

1849 ■ 8,00a 

3 Bonds surrendered by non-iubscribers to February 

4«h.l85(», 3,000 

24 Bonds surrendered by non-fubscribet s to August 

5ih,1850 34,000 

Total surrendered to August 5th, 1850, $1.250,000 

Internal Improvement Bonds. 

5662 Bonds surrendered by subscribers to July 1st, 

IS47 #5,662,000 

353 Bonds surrendered by Tion-svbscribers to July 1st, 

1847 353,000 

478 Bonds surrendered by subscribers, to January 1st, 

1848, 47»,00O 

116 Bonds surrendered by non-subsaibers to Jan. Ist, 

1848 146,000 

45 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to July 1st, 

1848, 45,000 

118 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to July 1st, 

1849, 118,000 

92 Bonds surrendered by noa-subscribers to February 

4ib, 1&50, . • 92,000 

"9 B inds surrendered by non-subscribers to August 

5th,1850, 7.,, . 79,000 

Total sarrenderad to August 5tb, IS50, '. $6,978.000 

Madifon. and Indianttpclis Railroad Btmdtk 

*^ Bonds surrendered by subscribers to July Ist, 

*5,47, 800,000 

."Olds surrendered bv non-subscrUiers to July 1st, 

^^^'- • •..♦• as/wo 

w fioads surrendered bv subscribers to January Ist, 

.^< ..: urn 

* Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to January 
l«».i848 ftfidO 



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3 Bonds surrendered by non-subscrtifers to July Isl, 

1848, • 2J0OO 

4 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribef's to July lst» 

1849, * 4^000 

6 Bonds surrendered by fion^iLbsa^ibet*s to February 4, 

-. 1850, 6.000 

7 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to August 5, 

• 1850, 7,000 

Total surrendered to August 5, 1850, $365,000 



Lawrenceburgh and Indianapolis Railroad Bonds, 

£8 Bonds surrendered by sid)scribers to July 1st, 1847, $68,000 

3 Bonds surrendered by subscribers to Jan. 1st, 1848, 3,1100 
1 Bond surrendered by non-subscribers to January 

1st, 1848, 1,000 

4 Bonds surrendered' by non-subscribers to July 1st, 

1849, 4.000 

4 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to August 5, 

1850, 4.000 

Total surrendered to August 5, 1850,- • $80,000 

.. State. Bank. Bonds. , 

719 Bonds surrendered by subscribers io July 1st, 1847, $719^000 

27 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to July Ist, 

1847,. 27,000 

52 Bonds surrendered by subscribers to Jan. Ist, 1848, 52,000 

8 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to Jan. 1st, 

1848, 8,000 

4 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to July 1st, 

1848, 4,000 

28 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to July Ist, 

1849, 28,000 

7 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to Feb. 4, 

1850, 7,000 

21 Bonds surrendered by non-subscribers to August 5, 

1850, ' 21,000 

Total surrendered to August 5, 1850,. *' $866.000 



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Ni BdAdsrfiirren^eired by iulmtribtT$ to July 1 st, 1847, $18,000 
t tS&niff t^rtniettd by non-sub^riben to July Ist, 

W47. »,oa» 

I Bond surrendered by ne^nrAscnfef to Aktt. Ist, 

J848, 1,000 

1 Bonds stiT-nendei^d by non-subsjribert to July Ist, 

IMS. tW(f 



toM sorneffde)^ t6 A«g)ist 9, I960, te9.00tf 



ItecapUtOmton. 



Bonds outstanding aft pietiod of Ai^Mem^nl of Stalin 

Debt,Jttly 1st, t847, $lljmfiiO 

Amount stirrendered up to August 5, 1890, 9,563^000 

Totit<oQtstvidiog August 5. 1850,. ' flylO/lOp 



• * * -illl"' •»*"«'^ *» 

theamcmnt d/PMffifit p\riti\\in\ dTbondW^nfiirtidereil^elftfr^U^ 
ftif thr^itte Treti^ry, for t^lch 5 pef debt. Statef Stock Lisued, i^as 

Stock to nc&fcrtierf to July Ist, 1847, •3,722,500 

Stock to non^subieribers to Julv Ist, 1847, 344,000 

Stock to SMb§eribers to January 1st, 1848, 357,000 

Slock to wmMiiMibeys tb January 1st, 1 8^, 106,000 

Stock to noM^iubterOers to July 1st, 1S48, 49,50a 

foak t6 aw-ia&cvaef^ to July 1st. 1849 8J,000 

Stodt to iMii:i^uAseHA^^ to Fe1>. 4, 1850, M,000 

Stock to nom-subieribers to Aug: 5, 1850, 67,500 

■I p 

Toils' per cent: Stati Stock ttf AujAist 5« 1^, >• 1l4,1f6t,5ti6 
1D34 • ..^^ai^^ait 



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310 



Tw md mi^lmlf Per Cent. Siaie Sieck* 

The amouDt'of one-half the interest and one per cent of the 
principal of the bonds surrendered chargeable to the State Treasury, 
for which State Stock issued with interest, at the rate of 2i per 
cent.t commencing in 1853, is as follows, viz: 

Slock to subscribers to July 1st, 1847, #1,327,948 00 

Stock to non-subscribers to July 1st, 1847. ............ . 12K852 50 

Stock to subscribers to January Ist, 1848, 126,530 00 

Stock to non-subscribers to January 1st, 1848, 38,337 00 

Stock to non-subscribers to July 1st, 1848, 18,675 00 

Stock to subscribers for one-half of coupons on bonds 

surrendered to January 1st, 1848, 7,950 00 

Stock to non-subscribers for one-half of coupons on 

bonds surrendered to July 1st, 1848, 1,325 00 

Stock to non-subscribers for one^half of coupons on 

Bonds surrendered to July 1st, 1849, 33,570 00 

Stock to non-subscribers to Feb. 4, 1850, 23,375 00 

Stock to svbscribers for one-half of coupons on bonds 

surrendered to Feb. 4, 1850, 2.625 00 

Stock to non-subscribers for one-half of coupons on 

bonds surrendered to Feb. 4, 1850, 2,762 50 

Stock to non-subscrOers to Aug. 5, 1850, 31,690 00 

Stock to non-subscribers for one-half of coupons on 

bonds surrendered to Aug. 5, 1850, 87 50 

Total 2i per cent. State Stock issued to August 5, 

1850, $1,736,797 50 

Deduct for 2i per cent stock redeemed up to August 
: 5,1850, 20,000 00 

Total 2i per cent, stock outstanding August 5, 1850, $1,716,727 50 



Preferred Five Per Cent. Canal Stock. 

The amount of one-half the principal of bonds surrendered chai^ 
able to the canal, for which 5 per cent Stock issued to subscriben 
of $800,000 to canal, is as follows, viz : 

Stock to subscribers prior to July 1st, 1847, $3,722,500 

Stock to subscribers to July 1st, 1848, 357,000 

ToUl preferred Canal Stock issued to Aug. 5, 1850. $4,079,500 



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311 



Defen^d Five Per Cent. Canal Stock. ' 

The amount of OM-half the principal of bonds surrendered charge- 
able to canal, for which 5 per cent, stock issued to non^suhscriberii 
to $800,000 loan to canal, is as follows, viz: 

Stock to non-subscribers prior to July Ist, 1847,* • • • $344,000 

Stock to non-subscribers to Jan. 1st, 1848, 106,000 

Stock to non-subscribers to Jiily 1st, 1848, 49,500 

Stock to non-subscribers to July 1st, 1849, 81,000 

Stock to non-subscribers to Feb. 4th, 1850, 54,000 

Stock to non-subscribers to August 5th, 1850,- • 67,500 

Total stock issued to August 5th, 1850, $708,000 



Sfectal Preferred Two and One-half Per Cent. Canal Stock. 

The amount of one half of the interest on Wabash and Eria 
Canal Bojids surrendered chargeable to canal, for which Si per cent* 
>tock issued to subscribers of $800,000, as loan to canal, is as foU 
lows, viz : 

Stock to subscribers prior to July 1st, 1847, $1,106,7'29 

Stock to. subscribers to July 1st, 1848, 98,950 

Stock to subscribers for one-half of coupons surren- 
dered to July 1st, 1848, 7,950 

Stock to sulMcribers for one-half of coupons surren- 

derad to Aug. 5th, 1850, 2,625 

Total mvui to Aog. 5th, 1850, $1,816,850 



Special Deferred^ Two md One-half Per Cmt. Canal Stock. 

The amount of one-half the interest on Wabash and Erie Canal 
bonds surrendered, chargeable to canal, for which 2i per cent, stock 
issued to non-subscr^s to loan of $800,000 to canal, is as follows, 

viz: 

Stock to non-subscribers prior to July 1st, 1847, $101,212 50 

Stock to non-subscribers to Jan. 1st, 1848, 30,587 60 

Stock to non-subscribers to July 1st, 1848, 13,725 00 



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Stock to non-tnbseriberit for one half the coapoiis» to 

July Ist, 1849, * • • 1,385 00 

Stock to Don*subscriber8, to July 1st, 1849, 22*250 00 

Stock to non-suliscrib^rs, w feb. 4th, ll^AO, .l&^ 00 

Stock to noD*subscril>er9y for odjb bi&f the cpupons tp 

February 4lh, 1850, • .- %7«» $0 

Stock to non-subscribers to August 5th, 1850, 19,600 00 

9t^ to non-4ub crih^, for one htJf <ff coupon M» 

Aiigpst 5th, 1950..-. 97 5» 

^ Jil l I ' l JilIM^ 

^olal 9tock issAejl to Aogupt ^ik, 18^, «i«)7«40Q 09 



rrr-sr? 



ReeapitMkUum cf Sioeks is$ued. 



SippT cpqt St^te Stpck,. - f4J;9l,5DO DO 

aj per cent Sute Stock, lj3«,7aT 50 

5. pf r cent, preferred Canal Stock» 4^079,500 00 

S pir cent, deferred Canal Stock, 70JUKK) OQ 

per cent special preferr^ Canal Stock, 1,216,250 00 

per cent special deferred Canal Stock,- 5Ky7,40O 00 

Total stock issued to August 5th, 1^, tl V^*3T7 50 

Bbdoet 2i per cent Sui^ iStock re^eeiped* 20,009 6$ 

Total outstanding August Stfa, 18S0, • • • • f I^TOg^yy? « 



ftitetittif paid by Iho State on 9lai» $ per etnte ialj^ amllhat 
«t a rate of 4 per cent, until 1853, after which the rate will be 5 
per cent After 1853 the 2i per cent. State Stock will bear that 
tirtefttt 

The Canal aiocfca are thrown vpra the 0«na> bx tkeir ortdfftip* 
tion, principal and interest, under the arrangement of the Public 



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lit 



Oir M!A1« D) 



The amount of interest due and paid to the 3th August, 1850, ua» 
4)K tlie mrraugeinent with the bondholders, is as follows : 



Jjhf^ Dividnd^. 


AmuM-. 


AmQunt P((i^... 


Bftfunctp.up'd' 


July 1^,1847. 


$89,880 00 


•893J0 00 


#70 00 


Jan. |8t, 184S» 


90,590 00 


.90.450 00 


140 00 


Jaly Uu 1S48. 


91^80 00 


9«.430 00 


L50 00 


hn. Ut, 1849, 


93,090 00 


9-^A')0 00, 


340 00 


July Uu 1849. 


95,300 00 


94.740 00 


560 00 


JfW. \9U 1850, 
lulylaUlSSO, 


9a.8W 00 


94.690 00 


U30 00 


97,710 00 


92.399 00 


5.411 00 



nOMBSTIO DEBT OF THB STATJB. 



Six Per Cent. Treasury Notet. 

TotalamooQt issued, $1,500,000 

R^Pftined — 

h 1841-2, ;;..;:....; 147^700 

In 1843, 398^65 

Inl844. ' 900.S2i 

In 1845, 114,540 

In 1846, 147,370 

inl847, i 148,510 

In 1848, • 70;580 

JnIS49, 62,740 

In 1850, 86.00$ 

TbM WDoont ndwtMd «nd dtncelled, • • • $1,376,530 

l««Ting a balance of, 123,470 

From which dedact amount on hand for cancellation, 64,000 

Wtm total amount in circulation, $59,470 



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814 



FtM Per Cent. BamkSarip. 

9 

T«tal amount issued, f7!^6'M 

Rfideemed-^ 

In 1843, 46350 

In 1844, 91,990 

In 1845, 72,405 

In 1846, 76,590 

In 1847, 100,320 

In 1848 56,400 

1111849, V 56,350 

In 1850, 46,410 

Total amount redeemed and cancelled, $546^15 

Leaving a balance of, ' $175,825 

From which deduct amount on hand for cancellation, 65,000 

Leaves total amount unredeemed, • • • • * $110,985 

Quarter Per Cent. Treasury Notes. 

Total amount of iwue,- • • • • r t . .' $70,000 

Redeemed — 

In 1848, ^ 28,750 

In 1849, 31,565 

In 1850, 12,165 

Add amount on hand for cancellation 3,460 

Total amount redeemed^ • $75,940 

Excess of notes redeemed over notes issued, $5,940 



INTBRSST AOOOUNT. 



The following sums have been paid at the State Treasary as In- 
terest on treasury notes : 

Interest on treasury notes — 



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SI5 

On six por cents, $368,676 04 

Ob frepn- cento, 82,368 3» 

On qaarter-per cants, • » • • 57* 54 

Total amount audited, •,•••* $341,511 91 

Add interest on notes on hand, 6 per cents, 35,000 00 

Add interest on notes on hand, 5 per cents, 25,000- 00 

Total, $401,511 91 



RBCAPITULATION. 

Six per cente redoemecl, $1,440,530 00 

Fivo per cents redeemed, 61 1»175 Oft 

Quarterper cents redeemed, • 75,940 00 

TquI interest allowed,. • 401,511 91 

Amount paid on domestic debt, $2,529,156 91 



Notea •« CircuUtiion. 

8iiper<ients, $89,470 OO 

Rve per cents, 110,825 0© 

Quarter per cents', estimated,* • •. 2,000 00 

Total principal, $172,295 00 

Estimated interest, 85,000 00^ 

Total Domestic Debt, $257,295 OO 



Provision being made for the redemption of the fire per cent. 
Bank Scrip, by the Common School fund, derived from Banlc profits^ 
throogh the Sinking Fund Gomtnbsioners, it'wili mostly be absorbed 
through that channel, and will leave chargeable upon the ordinary 
revenues of the' State' the amount of six per cents, in circulation, as. 
follows: 

Amount of principal, - $59,470^ 

Estimated interest, 85,000 

Total, $94,470 



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w^^ 



WkBkftti MMD BEiB oMhh VROx «VAV» hom Mxrwommwm ASft 

AM A TO THB OHiO BlVfim UNOBR AUPBRIXTUUIPICB OT 



SEPOBT ifo. a; 

Thertf was remninibg' hi the hands of Tro^t^M oh Ui 
of April, 1849, as per report No. 4, the sum of • • • • $SiOlfi49 36 

The receipts by Trustees for the six months ending 
Oct. Ist, 1849, were as follows, viz : 

FroB> tolls and water rents No. 7498, $101,948 74 

From lands east and west of Tippecanoe No. 7499, ^JSIO OH 

Fro0^ lands in Vincennes District No. 7500, !I5,IM 09 

From: interest and exchange No. 7501, 13,22) SIf 

From subscription of Bondholders No. 7503, I53,8t4l> 69 

Total, $497,945 M 



Tb^ eigMnditures by Trustees foe the same period wera a»foIIo«% 
tfci: 

For general expenses, warrant No. 5104, $6i879r 6t 

For ordinary repairs of Canal No. 5105, !I4»031 T% 

For extraordinary repairs No. 5106, 10,M0 4$ 

For expenses of superintendence No. 5107, 2,933 95 

For expenses of Land office east and west of Tippe- 
canoe No. 5108, 3,346^ 3r 

For expenses of collection No. 5109, 2^0 73 

For construction of Canal from Coal Creek to Terre 

.Haute No. 5110. • d0,533 98 

For construction of Canal from Term Uuute to Point 

CoromeroeNo,51U, U»,001 U 

For constrwtioA of Canal from Point Commerce to^ 

Nwbury No. 6U2, 6%90D 8& 

For construction of Canal from Newbury to Ma\*s> 

ville No. 5113, -^ *. . 3,(832 40 

For construction of Cpnal South of May3vi]lo No. 

5114. l£,a45Uft 

For expenses of Surveys No. 5115, • 7,431 37 

For expenses of Land Office, Vincennes District, No. 
6116. 735 14 



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til 

or (lamages and water power No. 51 17, • 100 OCT 

brmtcrcston advnnceof $800,00aNo.5118, 12,609 84 

Balance on hand Oct. 1st, 1849, 191,960 93 

Tolal, $497,926 64 



REPORT Vo. 6. 

Receipts. 

here was romaining in the hands of Trustees on 1st 

October, 1849, as per report No. 5, the sum of- • • « $191,950 92 



The receipts by Trustees for the six months ending April 1st, 1850, 
ere as fullowst viz : 

torn toils and water rents No. 7503, $39,844 13 

rom lands east and west of Tippecanoe No. 7604, 26,506 50 

rom lands in Vincennes District No. 7505, 27,637 72 

rom interest and exchange No. 7607, 744 60 

rom suhscripiioq of Bondholders No. 7508, 251 JHQ Oft 

Total, , $537,993 87 



EzpendilureM. 

The expenditures by Trustees for the same period were as follows, 
i: 

>^ Iteneral expenses warrant No. 5119, 7,616 73 

T ordinary repairs No. 5120, 14,517 96 

>r extraordinary repairs No. 5121, 14.644 66 

>r expeoses of Juperintendenre No. 5122, 2,958 17 ' 

>r expenses of Land Office east and west of Tippe- ' 

canoe No. 5123, * 566. 87 

>r etpen^es of collection No. 5124, 2.488 43 

»r construction of Canalfrom' Coal Creek- to Terre- 

Haute No. 5126, 20,626 39 

>r construction of Canal from Terre Haute to Point 

Commerce No. 5126, 58,195 7i8 

|r cxMisiruciion of Canal from Point Commerce to 

Newbury No. 5127, . . 32,169 59 

1D35 



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m 

For eoBstnictioi^ of Cansl fiDni Newlmrjr tot Mityt* 

vifle No. 5128, «39,685B 

For construction of Canal South of Maysville No. 

&139, 28,6514 

For expenses of surveys No. 5130, 6,63i 10 

For expenses of Land Office in Yincennes District No. 

5131, 454« 

For damages and water power No. 5132, 3,380 S 

For interest on subscription of $800^000 No. 5133, • }6,531 » 

Balance on hand April 1st, 1850, • * • 298,935 (B 

Total, $537.9«S 



REPORT He. T. 

Receipts. 

There was remaining in the hands of Trustees on Ist 

April, 1850, as per report No. ^, the sum of $SU6fi6^ 



The receipts by the Trustees for tho m months ending Oct 1st, 
1860, were as follows, vte: 

From tolls and water rents No. 750&,- • • 9II(X$BB U 

Prom lands east and west of Tippecanoe No. 7510,* - 27,358 9 

From lands in Vincennes District No. 7£I1, 22,590 ii 

From interest and exchange No. 7512, 12,146 H 

From subscription of Bondholders No. 7513, 2,700 IV 

From overcharge for disbursements No. 7514, 553 (V 

' Total, - $4H8e4^» 

ExpenditMT^, 

ThQ expenditures by Tni9t«fd9 for ibi^MiM p«i«d wera asfolbtn^ 
Tix: 

For general expenses warrant No. 5134, $l%}9i ^ 

For ordinary repairs No. 513;$, Ifi,^ Of 

l^pr extraprdinary repairs No. 5136, 9^70 U 

For expenses of superintendence No. 5137,- » $^ tf 

fiQT expenses of Land Office east and west of Tippe* 

canoe. No. 5138 fT. 87931 

^ t^ptl^es of collection No. 5139, SJtf ^ 



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l>r «oakttbetioa of Caiwl from €o41 Cfetik to Tot»* 

,Klw«,No. 5140» 4,«T&01 

m construction of Canal from Terre Haute to Point 

I ComnDeice. No. 5141, > 8S,0I6 2t 

for construction of Canal from Point Commerce to 

Newburjr, No. 5142, 84,639 40 

fbreorotruction of Canal from Newbury to Mavs- 

ville, No.5143 '. . 38^818 10 

Ibr construction of Canal south of Meytville, No. 

,WH 106,947 58 

m expenses of enrreys. No. 5145, 6;3S4 01 

hr expenses of Land Office in Vineenne* district No. 

,5146, 472 70 

m damages and water power. No. 5147, 3,300 00 

[or interest on subscription of $800,000, No. 5148,. 84,278 75 
Utnce on hand Oct. 1st, 1%0, 194,910 09 

^»»«^ " fi74,864 38 

Oraod total of raenpu and «ipeDditar«9 on aeeoont «f Wabtttl 
ti Erie Canail from Hs commeQcement to Oct. Itt, 1890!, tit: 

BtpeHdUwns. 

Toul iiy State to surrender to TrtSstees, . T. . . . . f5;38i,565 81 

••41 by Tmstees to Oct. Ist, 1847, 7,430 7T 

'Oial by Trustees to April Ist, 1848. 188,848 89 

»i«l by Trustees to Oct. Ist, 1848, 885,46 J 48 

m by Trustees to April 1st, 1849, 885,648 57 

*>t«l by Trustees to Oct lst,184», 305,974 78 

«Ul by Trustees to April 1st, 1850, 239,058 84 

•Ul by Trustees to Oct. 1st, 1850, 279,954 89 

otalcosttoOct. 1st, 1850, #6,733,988 63 



Rtceiptg. 

fttai by State to surrender to Truitee^, #1,701,459 44 

»t*l by Trustees to Oct. Ist, 1847, 303356 73 

Dial by Trustees to April 1st, 1848, 835,066 Si 

otal by Trustees to Oct. 1st, 1848 150,550 44 

otti by Trustees to April Ut, 1849, 100,760 64 

»<^by Trustees to Oct. 1st, 1849, Mtfiff U 



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w 

Total by Trustees, to April 1st, 1850^ 84S^ ff 

Tolal by Trustees to Oct. 1st, 1850, 175,929 35 

Total receipts from all sources to Oct. 1st, IS50,- • $3»3U8,?32 U 
Deduct subscription of bondholders, to be refunded 

from revenues of Cunal, 816,610 63 

Total net receipts, • $2,493,121 71 

Tolal expenditures, 6,733,928 S 

Grand total of expenditures over receipts fronn com« 

mencement tc Oct 1st, 185U, $4,341,806 Si 



TOLLS AND WATISR BENTS OF WABASH AND EHIX CANAL. 

The followini; is the amount of atolls and water rents received ti 
each Toll Collector's office on the Wnbash and Erie Caoal, Uosi 
October 1st, 1849, to October 1st, 1850, viz: 

Fort Wayne office, for October, 1849, $9,246 SS 

Fort Wayne office, for November, 1849, 7,960 iS 

Fort Wavne office, for December, 1849, 43S S4 

Fort Wayne office, for January, 1850, 000 00 

Fort Wayne office, for February, 18S0, 000 00 

Fort Wayne office, for March, 1850, 466 44 

Fort Wayne office, for April, 1850, 4,612 13 

Fort Wayne office, for May, 1850, 4,795 OH 

Fort Wavne office, for June, 1850,. . . ." 4,518 85 

Fort Wayne office, for July, 1850, 4.1S2 » 

Fort Wayne office, for August, 1850, 8,243 2 

Fort Wayne office, for September, 1850, ,1 1,238 70 



Total, $55,8 J4 01 



Lagro office, for October, 1849, • $1,776 5 

Lagro office, for Noveniber, 1849, 889 K j 

Lagro office,'for December, 1849, 366 4i 

Lagro o!lice, for January, 1850, OOO Oil 

Lagio office, for February, 1850, , 000 (• 

Logro office, for March, 1850, ' 763 SJ 

Lagro o!i:ce, for April, 1850, 1,075 il 

Lagro office, fur May, 1850, I,l42 S 

Lagro oifice, for June, 1850, 897 K 

Lagro office, for July, 1850, 133 St 



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f liBgrD.ofliee, for August, IfiSO.f 1,5S7 93 

Lagro ofScet for. September^ 1850, • . 1,878 33 

Total. ^...•. $10,501 74 



Logttntport office, T^r October, 1849, #1,151 34 

Logansport office, Tor November, 1849, 1,090 21 

Loganspi)rt office, for December, 1849, 33 69 

Logansport offioe, for January, 1850, 0,000 00 

Logansport offioe, tor February, 1850, 0,000 04 

Logansport offioe, for March, 1850, * 1,049 24 

Louansport office, for April, 1850,- • • 2,10123 

Logansport offioe, for May, 1850, 1,768 15 

Logansport office, for June, 1850, 1,591 62 

Logansport olfice, for July, 1850, 501 83 

Logansport office, for August, 1850, 3,035 72 

Logansport office, for Sei>tember, 1850l,« 2,485 14 

Total, #16,807 17 



Larnyetfe office, for October, 1849, #4,425 53 

Lafayette office, for Noveraber,1849, 4,21 1 60 

Lafayette office, for December, 1849, 660 34 

Lafayette office, for January, 1850, 000 00 

Lafayette office, for February, 1850, 000 00 

Lafayette office, for March, 1&50, 1,586 36 

Lafayette office, for April, 1850, 10,127 31 

Lafayette office, for May, 1850,. . 7^78 22 

Lafayette office, for June, 1850, 7,718 80 

Lafayette office, for July, 1850, 3,798 43 

Lafayette office, for August, 1850 6,450 25 

Lafayette office, for September, 1850, 7,056 18 

Total, #53,903 02 



Covington office, for October, 1849, #2,394 38 

Covington office, for November, 1849, 1,255 29 

. Covington office, for December, 1849, 25 80 

Covington office, for January, 1850, 000 00 

Covington offioe, for February, 1850, • • 000 00 

Covington office, for March, 1850, 000 00 

Ceviogton offioe» for April, 1850, 1,918 67 



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Oovingtta office, for May^ 1650, |I^MT Tl 

Covington office, for June, 185U, IfiOi 81 

Covington office, (or July, 1850, 1,679 09 

Covington office, for Aogost, 1850, • 1,20S 75 

Covington office, for September, 1850, • • 1391 68 

Total, $12,959 18 

Ten^ Haute office^ for July, 1850, f42i 3T 

Terra Haute office, for Aogesi, 1960, fi08 10 

Terre Haute o$ce, for September, 1850, 384 OC 

\ 

Toul, #1,306 51 



WABASB MID BBIB- CAjTAI. SCBI^ ■AM' OP TVi^BOAMa. 

Hie sMouni ef Canal Laad Scrip East, iflsuad- by the Auditor and 
Treasorer of State, with the dates of the respective issues, is as fol- 
lows, viz: 

1848; May 7, from No. 1 to No. 10;B68, $&1,340 Of 

I84S, May 2U, from No, 10,26» to No. 1 1,369 5,006 00 

1843, May 25, from No. 11 ,269 to No. 15,262, 19,965 09 

1848, Dec 28, from No. 15,262 to No. 20^)63, 35,000 09 

1844, May 4, from No. 20,362 to No. 24,363, iOfiOO 00 

1844, Sept. 4, from No. 34,362 to No. 28^262, 30^)00 09 

1844, Oct. 19, from No. 28,263 to No. 34,363, 30,000 00 

t846, April 35, from No. 34,363 to No. 44,363, SOftOO 09 

t84S^ July 11, from No. 44,263 to No. 60,363. 30.000 09 

1845, Aug. 23, from No. 50,363 to No. 5 • ,362, 30,000 09 

1846, Feb. 11, from No. 54,363 to No. 61,263^ 35,000 09 

h 

Total issued by Auditor and Treasurer, $306,310 00 

Add to the foregoing the following amounts issued by 
Commissioners of Wabash and £rie Canal, a Reg- 
ister of which was filed in this office, viz: 

Amount issued by J. L. WilliatM,. as per certificates 

No. 1 to No. 7,097, 83,198 04 

Amount issued by S. Fisher, as per certificates No. 
7.098 to No. 7,914, • 7,711 01 

• Tbttf amount, - .••• $396,219 09 



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T%ere hare been redeemed and cancelled at the Treasury the fol- 
lowing aumst viz : 

1843, Sept. 19, as per warrant No. 6^78, $33,452 11 

1843, Sept. 19, as per warrant No. 6,490, • 31,419 68 

1844, Jan. 12, as per warrant No. 6,706, 44,017 76 

1844, Sept. 10, as per warrant No. 7,914, 100 00 

1846, March 6, as per warrant No. 793, 90,537 92 

1847, Jan. 23, as per warrant No. 1^70, 90^64 85 

1848, Feb. 22, as per warrant No. 2,692, 14,165 45 

1849, Jan. 22, as per warrant No. 3,.541, 41,667 06 

1850, Jan. 15, as per warrant No. 4,252, • • 25,453 01 

Total redeemed and cancelled, $371,277 84 

Amount in Treasury not cancelled, • • 12,999 88 

Total amount redeemed, $384,277 72 

Total amount issued, 396,219 05 

Leaving total amount outstanding, $11.941 33 



WABASH AHD BBIS OAITAL SCKIP, WJBT.- 

Scrip bsued. 
Total amount of Scrip issued, • • • • 



$819,980 



Scrip Redeemed. 



Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 
Amount redeemed 



nl843,. 
n 1844,. 
nl845,. 
in 1846, < 
nl847,. 
nl848,< 
n 1849,. 
nl850. 



Total amount redeemed and cancelled, * 
Amount in Treasury not cancelled, 



Total amount redeemed, • .••.•••. 

Leaving total amount outstanding Oct. 31, 1850, • ^ « 



$29,255 

135,275 

9134D 

259,415 

191,150 

31,425 

36,985 

15345 

$791,190 
22,490 

$813,680 
6,300 



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DOCUMENTS 



OF THS 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF INDIANA. 



AT THB 



THBTY-FIFTB SESSION, 



COMJISHOUIO 



DECEMBER 30, 1850. 



PAST SBOOVD. 



BT AUTHORITY. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 
f. P. CHAPMAN. STATE PRIJ^TM. 

1851. ^ , 

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CONTENTS. 



PART IJ, 



Report of the Trustees o{ the Institute for the Blindt I 

Report of the Agent of State, . , • . . ^ 57 

Report of the Trustees of the W. and E. Canal, - - 137 
Report of the Trustees and Superintendent of the Asylum 

for the Deaf and Dumb, S17 

Report of the State Librarian, 269 

Report of the Quarter Master General, ... 377 

Address of Col. Dumont, 285 

Address of Col. Lane, 301 

Report of the Joint committee to investigate charges against 

officers of the Hospital for the Insane, - • • « 317 

Veto Message of Gov. Wright, Ann BIythestone Bill, - 325 

Veto Message of Gov. Wright, Warren county Bill, < 329 

Census Returns of Mr. Meredith, 333 



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Doc. No. 1.] [Part. II. 



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D 

13 



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FOURTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF TUB TRUSTBBS OF THB 



INDIANA INSTITUTE 



FOR THS 



EDUCATION OF THE BLIND 



TO THS 



OENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



DECEMBER 16, 1850. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTKR. 
18 50. 



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OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTE. 



TRUSTEES. 



GEORGE W. MEARS, Chairman. 
SETON W. NORRIS, Treasurer. 
JA;VIES M. RAY, Secretary. 



ACTING SUPERINTENDENT : 

W. H. CHURCHMAN. 

L^E^M^ CURTIS. ! ^"^""^ ''««*«•'• 
L. S. NEWELL, Teacher of Music. 
S. McGIFFIN, Teacher of Handicraft. 
Mm. M. G. DEMOSS, Matron. 
DR. MEARS, Visiting Physician. 



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CATALOGUE OF PUPILS. 



Jfamt*. 



Rttidtntt. 



When ad' 

mined. 



C«M« «f BHmdn999. 



1 
9 

3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 
11 
IS 
13 
14 
IS 
16 
17 
18 

19 
SO 
81 
SS 

84 
Si 

16 
87 
9R 
29 
30 
31 
33 
33 
34 
3S 

:« 

37 
38 
'J9 

40 
41 
4S 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
30 
51 
S 



Aaron Gyger 

NeUon W. Richhart... 

Susanna E. Richhart,. 

JohnM. Richhart, 

Albertus Taylor, 

•Daniel Byrkit 

John ByrkiV 

Gcori^e O. Work 

liaac M. Eafiley 

fLorenio T.Tucker,.., 

Elixa Kinnear, 

William E. Read 

Wm. H. McQuerry,... 

Lawrence D. Taylor,. . 

Wm. T. Fleming 

•Michael Courtney,.... 
IIGfo. W. Culbertson,.. 

Margaret Belchea, 



I Benjamin Morrow,. 

IIGeo.W. Hihbiti,.... 

, 11 J. S. R. Bergin,.... 

Ell Denny, 

I John Leonard, 

■ GareySufTord 

Sarah S. Morgan,.. 



AlthaA.Paxton,.... 

f Louisa Helton, 

|Silaa Helton, 

Mark Maudlin, 

Mary Boileau, 

Isaac Cook 

James O.Johnson,... 
fPhebe A. Robinctt,.. 

Margaret E. Barnes,. 

8arah C.Barnes,.... 

John W. Record 

Rachel Martin, 

Carolina Groff, 

John G.Witt, 



John DaTis. 

Charles A. Kelson,. .. 
Alexander Campbell,. 

Wm.H. Young, 

James Jackson, 

Wm. T. Tooms, 

Robert Cope, 

Allen Thorn 

Rebecca Sedam, 

Sarah A. Hamilton,.. 

M.Ann Smith, 

Nancy C.Smith, 

Mary J. Ralnaklng,.. 



I^wrence County, 
Kosciusko ** 



Foontain, 
Henry, 

Allen, 

Montgomery 

Jackson, 

JefTerson, 

Ohio, 

Hancock, 

Marshall, 

Howard, 

Decatur, 

Wayne, 

Jefferson, 

Montgomery, 

Dearborn, 

Marion, 

Hamilton, 

Owen, 

Union, 



Henry, 
Morgan, 
t« 

Washington, 
Harrison, 
Wayne, 
«« 

Hancock, 
Decatur, 
ti 

Marion, 
Randolph, 
Payette, 
Dearborn, 



1847, 
Oct. 



»• IC 

Nov. 3 

" 83 

^ ft5 

1848, 

Jan. 8 

" 81 

Feb. 16 

Apr. 1 

June 1 

Oct. 18 

•» 18 

1849, 

Feb. 13 

June 1 

1 

1 

" 1 
" 1 
" 1 
" 1 

" n 

" 11 
.. ]9 

" 19 

" 83 

Dec. 5 

1850. 



Oct. 



Fountain, 


•• 


June 




Bartholomew 


14 


Oct. 




Decatur, 


•• 


«• 




Jackson, 


4t 


tt 




Switxeriand, 


*• 


t( 




Scott, 


M 


•* 




Jefferson, 


t> 


4* 




Lawrence, 


•* 


** 




Johnson, 


I* 


tt 




Sullivan, 


*» 


»* 


18 


Harrison, 


•1 


»• 


83 




>1 


II 


83 


Floyd, 


" 


Nov 


7 



Scarlet Fever, 

Congenital, 

Congenital, 

Congenital, 

Congenital, 

Congenital, 

Congodital, 

Conicenital, 

Accident 

Congenital, 

Accident, 

Congenital. 

Whooping Conglu 

Inflammatioa. 

Fever. 

Congenital. 

Fever, 

Amaurosii. 

Cataract. 

CongenlUl. 

Accident. 

CongenitaL 

Scarlet Fever. 

Inflammation. 

Inflammation. 

Accident, 

Congenital. 

CongenitaL 

Accident. 

Inflammation. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Scrorula. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Accident. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Measles. 

Winter Fever. 

Inflammation. 

Congenital. 

Amaurosis. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Inflammation. 

Scarlet Fever. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 



•Honorably discharged. fLeft. |) Deceased. 



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REPORT. 



To the General Assembly of the State of Indiana: 

The Trustees of the Institute of the State for the education of the 
Blind, present their fourth annual Report. 

It will be gratifying to the Legislature to observe a continued in- 
crease of the number of the afflicted blind of the State, who enjoy 
the beneficent provisions made by the people for their improvement. 

The whole number of pupils, participating in the instruction of 
the Institute in the past year, has been fifty-two. 

Adequate provision has been made for the education of the pre- 
sent number of pupils and of any anticipated increase of the year 
before us. 

The continued fidelity of Mr. W. H. Churchman in superintending 
md of the other Instructors in the literary department, as well as of 
■hose engaged in teaching music and handicraft, and of the Matron, 
las been attended with gratifying success. 

The resignation of Miss Eh'za M. Hamilton, whose brief connec- 
ion with the Institute had given us much hope of her success, was 
endered on account of ill health, and accepted. 

The valuable services of Miss £ditha M. Curtis, as a teacher, have 
een again secured, she having been necessarily disconnected with 
ie Institute during part of the year. 

On account of the large proportion of male scholars, several of 
^hom are young men, the Trustees have been for some time paM 
ssirous of procuring the addition of a male teacher of suitable 
ipacity and promise of usefulness ; and therefore we availed our- 

lives of the vacancy occurring, to effect such object. Not having 
2DS 



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such a teacher, experienced with the bHud» ofl'ered to us at'ler Id- 
quiry, as was desired, we were gratified in procuring by appoint- 
ment, the services of Mr. Barnabus M. Fay, who had, for six years, 
discharged the duties of an Instructor in the New York Institutioa 
for the Deaf and Dumb, which is under the charge of Dr. Pact, the 
distinguished Principal. As the same desire to benefit the afHicted, 
which led Mr. Fay to engage for so many years in the instruction of 
mutes, has determined him to devote his life to the improvement of 
the blind, we have every confidence, from his talents, deportment and 
whole influence, that he will be a valuable acquisition to the Insti- 
tute. 

We have continued to authorize exhibitions, during the vacation 
by the acting superintendent, with some of the pupils, which have 
been given in as many counties of the State, as was practicable. 
But little expense b thus incurred, and even this would be cheerfully 
discharged by the citizens, but that it is our direction, that no chari- 
table appeals should be made. 

These exhibitions of the attainments of the pupils of the Institute 
will be successively extended to the various portions of the State, 
bringing thus, to the friends of the ignorant and helpless blind, con- 
vincing proof of their capability of improvement. 

As authorized by law, we have applied part of the means intrusted 
to our charge in the construction of an excellent stone foundation 
for the main building of the Institute, the plan of which having been 
adopted, after its examination and approval by the ofHcei-s of the 
principal Institutions for the blind in the United States. 

Pursuing the settled policy of the Board to invite fair competition 
in every leading branch of expenditure by receiving public proposals, 
and to insure the lowest bids which prompt payment will justify by 
{MTOvidiog for the punctual discharge of every obligation incurred^ 
we have procured the materials and workmanship of approvd 
quality, at very favorable rates. 

In this, as in every branch of disbursement, the means are only 
drawn from the Treasury, in such limited sums as they are needed, and 
eroy account has to be allowed by the Board before becoming a 
charge to the Fund. 

It will, we trust, meet the views of the General Assembly to ex- 
tend such an enlargement of means to this department of the public 
benevolence, as will permit a progress, in the erection of the main 



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building for the Institute, such as a regard to the best management 
of its operations, and to the increasing demands of the blind of the 
State calls for. 

We have for the first time to record the decease of pupils; three 
of our most promising scholars having died during the past year, not 
however of disease to be ascribed peculiarly to their residence here — 
on the contrary, we are well satisfied, that the health of the inmates 
of the Institute, under the attention faithfully given to their cleanli- 
ness, exercise and general habits, is much safer, than it would ordi- 
narily be, at their respective homes. 

We cannot forbear to testify to the unwearied care and attention 
of our excellent Matron, Mrs. Demoss, during the illness of the pu- 
pils. She merits and receives, together with the sympathizing teach- 
ers and fellow pupils, our warmest commendations. 

These sad and repeated providences admonish us of the obligation 
we owe to the pupils and their friends, that while their hands are 
trained to useful craft, and their minds to research and perception, 
they shall be faithfully pointed by those engaged in their instruction, 
to that gracious Redeemer, whose delight, when upon earth, was to 
give sight to the blind, and through whom, that eternity, so near to 
them, may be an eternity of vision and joy. 

We add a summary, classifying the objects of expenditure of the 
year comprised in the Treasurer's statement, herewith submitted : 



SUMMARY. 

Salaries of Superintendent, Teachers and Matron, • • • $1,982 50 

Groceries, Provisions, and Provender, 1,753 01 

Domestic hire, 649 68 

Personal property for use of household department, • • 240 18 

Fuel, • 203 25 

Drugs, medicines, medical attendance and funeral ex- 
penses, • • • • 164 03 

Advanced for clothing of pupils, 80 00 

School apparatus, 24 95 

Books, stationery and printing, 91 73 

Musical instruments and repairs on same, 12 75 

Tools and fixtures for work department, 41 87 



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13 

Raw material for work department, 1,121 89 

Labor and instruction in '* << 341 06 

Insurance on personal property of the Institute, 22 00 

Postage, 18 00 

Miscellaneous expenses, 17 05 

$6,763 95 

Expenses of tour with pupils, 101 35 

Erecting cellar walls of main building, including exca> 

vation for the same, 3,737 24 

Erection of a brick building stables, carriage house 

and store room, 901 59 

Miscellaneous improvements and repairs, 414 01 

Discharge of Loan from the Sinking Fund in anticipa- 
tion of the revenue, 2,500 00 

Add amount unexpended in hands of Superintendent 

Nov. 1, 1850, above the amount of last report,* • • • 412 90 

ToUl amount, $ 14^33 04 



The attention of the Legislature is invited to the accompanying 
detailed and comprehensive report of the acting Superintendent, and 
to the important suggestions therein which merit the careful considera- 
tion' of the friends of the blind. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEO. W. MEARS, ) 

S. W. NORRIS, } Trustees. 

JAMES M. RAY, ) 

Ihdianapolis, December, 6, 1850. 



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SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Ind. Institute for the Education of the Blind: 

Gx3fTi.BMBN : — The undesigned in compliance with a duty devolv- 
ing upon him as the executive head of the Institute under the care 
of your board, would respectfully submit his fourth annual report of 
the condition and progress of its several departments, as follows: 

In taking a retrospective view of the history of our interesting 
charge .during the year just closed, it is not without feelings of the 
most profound gratitutde to "Him that tempers the wind to the shorn 
lamby!' that I am enabled to tell of continued prosperity in its mis* 
sion of love to the sons and daughters of affliction. At no previous 
time since the foundation of the Institute have you had so much 
cause for congratulation upon the success of the benevolent enter- 
prise entrusted to your guardianship. Though the school has but 
just entered upon its fourth session, its registry contains the names 
of no less than fifty-nine of Indiana's afflicted children, a larger 
nnmber we think than has been received within the same time after 
its oi^nization, by any other institution fpt the Blind in this coun- 
try, if not in Europe. Some of these have already gone forth into 
the world with greatly increased facilities, both for happiness and 
usefulness, while the remainder are with few exceptions, still 
members of our happy family, drinking greedily at the fountains of 
knowledge, or plying their several industrial occupations, their hith- 
erto dormant faculties springing into newness of life under the vivi- 
fying influence of the light of truth, and their desponding hearts, to 
which HopQ had long been a stranger, rousing up into fresh energy 
in view of the brighter day now dawning upon them. But by no 



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means the least gratifying evidence of success, may be found in the 
steadily increasing interest in our cause which is manifested in every 
section of the State. The universal sentiment expressed by the 
numerous visiters who pass through our apartments, witnessing 
the attainments of the pupils and the means provided for their com> 
fort and improvement, is that of grateful satisfaction and a deter- 
mination to do all in their power to further *an enterprise fraught 
with so much good. 

OFFICERS. 

Of the several officers associated with me in the Institute, I am 
happy in being able as heretofore, to bear most gratifying testimony : 
and I believe I hazard nothing in the assertion that for harmony of 
intercourse, and efficiency in the discharge of their respective duties, 
they are unsurpassed by the faculty of any similar institution. 

The resignation of Miss E.M.Hamilton on the first of March 
last in consequence of the failure of her health, was a souixe of un- 
feigned regret to her associates and pupils, as well on account of that 
courtesy and amiability of deportment which rendered her so agree- 
able a companion, as of the loss we sustained in the withdrawal of 
her services from a field of labor for which she seemed so eminently 
qualified. 

We have reason to hope however, that in her successor, Mr, B. M. 
Fay, who entered upon the discharge of his duties at the commence- 
ment of the current session, we will find an officer no less qualified 
in any respect for the station. The field is indeed a new one to him, 
but he has entered it with an evident determination to devote himself 
permanently to the work; and from such evidence as has already 
been given, we cannot doubt of his success as an instructor of the 
Blind. 

Miss E. M. Curtis was also obliged on the first of April, to sever 
for a time her connection with us, on account of the sickness and 
death of her mother; but she resumed the duties of her post as as- 
sistant in the school department and instructor of female handicraft, 
with the opening of the present session. During the absence of 
Miss C, Mrs. M. M. Churchman at your solicitation, kindly con- 
sented to assume the charge of her department. 



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15 



PUPILS. 

At the date of our last annual report, our school numbered ihirly- 
eight pupils. Since that time fourteen others have been received, 
making the entire number in attendance during the year, fifty-two, 
But of this number, six have left, viz : 

S11.AS and Louisa Helton of Morgan county. 
Phkbe a. Robinett of Hancock county, 
LoHENzo T. Tucker of Jackson county, 
Daniel Byrkit of Henry county, 
Michael Courtney of Decatur county. 

Three also have been removed by death, viz: 
George W. Culbertson of Wayne county, 
John S. R. Bergin of Marion county, 
George W. Hibbitts of Dearborn county. 

This leaves the number at present connected ivith the Institute, 
forty-three. 

Silas and Louisa Helton left informally after remitining only a 
few months with us ; and therefore received but little benefit from 
their connection with the Institute. 

Phebe A. Robinett returned home in the latter part of December, 
in consequence of her sight having so far improved, as to prevent 
her being benefitted by our methods of instruction. 

Lorenzo T. Tucker and Daniel Byrkit, after having made them* 
selves acquainted with several branches of handicraft, retarned to 
their respective homes with a view of applying their knowledge to 
practice in the way of self-maintenance. They are cordially recom- 
mended to the kindness and patronage of the community as compe- 
tent workmen. 

Michael Courtney has abo become quite expert in themanoiactore 
of willow-work and brooms, and is temporarily engaged as an assis- 
tant in our willow department, though he expects in a short time to 
Q^ke an efibrt to establish himself in business. Should he do so, he 
too will carry with him the confidence of both officers and pupils, as 
^ell as their sincere desire for his success. 

Most of this year's increase in our numbers, like that of the last» 
is the result of our travelling with some of the advanced pupils for 



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16 

the purpose of visiting the Blind at their homes, and of making 
public exhibitions of the practicability of our system of instruction, 
in parts of the State, remote from the capital. It is earnestly re- 
commended therefore, that these tours be continued annually until 
erery county in the State shall have been trarversed. The labor and 
expense attendant upon such journies, are by no means trivial; but 
if we would extend the blessings of education to all the young blind 
within our borders, we must for reasons presented at length in pre- 
vious reports, pursue this as the most effective means of accomplish- 
ing the desired end. Besides, it enables a large class of our citizens 
whose business never calls them to the seat of Government, and who 
would therefore never be able to visit us, an opportunity of witness- 
ing the gratifying fruits of their beneficence in the support of the Insti- 
tute, which goes far to insure a continuation of their cheerful co-op- 
eration with the General Assembly, in its noble efforts to ameliorate 
the condition of an alBSiicted though well deserving class of their fel- 
low citizens. 

Our recent tour of some of the southern ceunties, made under the 
instructions of your board, was commenced it the close of the last 
session, and occupied nearly four weeks. The counties visited on 
this occasion were the following, viz: Johnson, Bartholomew, Jack- 
son, Washington, Harrison, Floyd, Clark, Scott, Jefferson, Switzer- 
land, Ohio, Dearborn, Ripley, Decatur and Shelby. 

We found numerous eligible subjects for instruction in the course 
of our route, the most of whom have since been placed under our 
charge. We also gave public exhibitions in most of the principal 
towns, which were generally well attended, and did much we trust 
to interest the hearts of the people in our philanthropic work. 

We received everywhere marked attention from members of the 
Legislature and othei's, for which we would embrace this opportunity 
to tender our grateful acknowledgments. 

The law of the last session of the Legislature, requiring the county 
Assessors to report the name, age and residence of each deaf and 
dumb, blind and insane person throughout the State to the Auditors 
of their respective counties^ aided us somewhat in our search for 
scholars during the trip referred to; but the assistance from this 
source was not as great as was designed by the General Assembly, 
on account of the very imperfect manner in which the law was car- 
ried out The cause of the failure on the part of many of the 



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17 

county officers, to comply fully with tb« rtquintions of the act 
alluded too, may in this instance be mainly attributable to the fact 
of their not having received their instructions until after they had 
made their regular assessments, as we were informed by several that 
they had been obliged on that account to make their reports from 
memory. We think it more than probable however, judging from 
previous experience in this and several other State, that we will 
never be able to obtain a complete list of the Blind within our State 
limits, until such functionaries shall be so impressed with the impor* 
tance of accuracy in this matter, as to feel the necessity of making 
strict inquiry at every house within their respective districts. They 
are too prone to depend upon their personal knowledge of the fami* 
lies of their constituents, and upon their memory of the situation of 
each, with regard to such matters. We have often been told by 
public men in different parts of the country, while travelling in quest 
of blind pupils, that being acquainted with all the citizens of the 
counties in which they resided, they knew there were no blind chil- 
dren among them; but have afterwards found several within their 
immediate neighborhoods, of which they knew nothing or had for^ 
gotten them. Blind children are generally shy of strangers, and OB 
the approach of the latter to the houses of their parents, retire out 
of sight. The parents too from various motives, are not onfrequently 
averse to having their children exposed to the gaze of strangers and 
when inquired of by persons appointed to collect such statistics, they 
are apt to equivocate, especially if their children possess some vision. 
It is doubtless from these causes that the well known inaccuracy of 
the United States census arises. 

Through the kindness of Dr. E. W. H. Ellis, Auditor of State, we 
have been enabled to procure the returns of the Blind from some fif- 
ty-four counties, in which there was some pains taken to compl> 
with the requisitions of the act heretofore mentioned. These show 
but two hundred and thirty-five blind persons, of all ages, in said 
counties, which, from the acknowledged deficiencies in some of these 
returns, is undoubtedly far below the actual number in these coun- 
ties. But even sqpposing this to be a correct statement, we may es- 
timate the whole number in the State, to be no less than four hund- 
red. It is quite probable that the County Officers, in their enumera- 
tion, included only those who were totally blind; while there are 
very many partially blind, who, from their inability to acquire an 
1D3 



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18 

education by rneaof of tlieir mferbci viaon, are d^iUe subjects 
for our institate. 

In Tiew of the importance to as of conect information upon tins 
subject, allow me before dismissing it, to suggest tbe propriety of 
your recommending to tbe next Legislature, the passage of a law, 
making it tbe annual duty of the appropriate county officers to re- 
turn to the Auditor of State, the name, age, Post Office address 
and, in case of minors, the names of the parents or guardians, of each 
blind person in the State, including all who do not possess sufficieot 
sight to enable them to learn to read and write in the ordinary man- 
ner. And, in order to insure accuracy, they should be required to 
make particular inquiry at every house in the State. This would 
add but little to the duties of these officers, while it would render as 
invaluable aid in carr3ring out ihfc objects of the Institute. 

HEALTH. 

In all previous communications to your board, it has been our in- 
estimable privil^e, to be permitted to report entire immunity from 
fatal disease, and even a remarkable exemption from sickness ofaay 
form ; but while the priceless boon of health has still been vouchsafed 
10 nearly all of our numerous household, yet it becomes our painful 
duty, on this occasion, to record the inroads of Death, into our hith- 
erto unbroken circle. Not only once did the Destroyer let us feel 
the desolating power of his ruthless hand, but again, and even again, 
did he make hb appearance, plucking from our midst, at each assault, 
one of the most promising of our number. 

George W. Culbbhtson departed this life on the eighteenth of 
March, in the nineteenth year of his age. His death was occasioned 
by Pulmonary Consumption, which was doubtless inherited from 
his parents, as they both died with the same disease. 

The deceased had been a pupil with us from the opening ^of the 
school, and as such, won for himself the confidence of his teachers, 
and the affectionate regard of all his associates. He had been for 
some time an acceptable member of the Methodist Episcopal Church ; 
and while his loss is mourned by all, we are cheered by the hope 
that he has been transported to a brighter and better world, upon 
whose beauties his unsealed eyes may gaze with rapturous delight, 
and where he has experienced a re-union with his beloved parents. 



I 



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19 

JoHH S. R. Bbboin died on the tweaty-e^hth of March, in the 
sixteenth year of his age, after a painful illness of eight weeks. His 
death was caused by Typhoid Fever. He, too, was a most exem- 
plary pupilt and possessed an excellent mind. Enei^etic, industrious, 
and persevering, he gave promise of much future usefulness ; and had 
he been spared to us, would undoubtedly have proved an ornament 
to his class, and an honor to his place of education. Though young 
he also had made a profession of Religion, and united himself to the 
Presbyterian Church before entering the Institute. 

Gborob W. Hibbitts died very suddenly, on the fourth of May, 
with Congestion of the Brain, being in the eleventh year of his age. 

George was a remarkably interesting child, possessing, with many 
noble and amiable traits of disposition, an intellect of more than usu- 
al activity. Such, indeed, was his fondness for study, that it not un- 
frequently became necessary to restrain him ; and it required con* 
slant watchfulness on the part of his teaciiers, to keep him from pour- 
ing over hb books, while his companions were at play. With such 
qualities as these, it were needless to add, that he was a universal fa- 
vorite with us, and that his untimely end was deeply felt by all, as a 
severe affliction. 

Thus have we been called to follow to their last resting place in 
^he silent tomb, three of the brightest ornaments of our school. And 
while we deeply mourn their departure, we are not unmiiidful of the 
sad bereavement sustained by their relatives and friends. Heartily 
do we sympathize with them in their loss, and rejoice with them in 
the confident hope that the deceased, on awakening from the sleep of 
death, will find themselves in a better and happier land, where in- 
firmity can reach them no more. Were it consbtent with the na* 
ture and limits of a communication like thb, it would be a source of 
inexpressible pleasure, to dwell upon the memory of the departed 
ones, who had so engrafted themselves upon our affections. A thou- 
sand recollections spring up, as we write, which it would be a pleas- 
ure to record ; but we must not tarry longer than to assure you, and 
through you their friends, that during their hours of illness, they re- 
ceived every care and comfort that the physician's art, and the kind 
attentions of sympathizing friends could minbter. In our estimable 
Matron, whose previous experience, added to a heart full of kindness, 
eminently qualifies hei* for the peculiarly arduous duties of the sick 
chambert they found a mother, indeed. No parent's hand could 



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make a smoother pillow» no parent's eye be more sleepless during the 
long and silent watches of the night, or mobten quicker at each re- 
turning paroxysm of pain, than did hers ; and we are most happy 
in being able to pay this slight tribute to her worth* 

It must be to you, as it is to us, a matter of heartfelt congratola- 
tion, that the deaths of these three pupils are in no wise attributable 
to our location, or any other circumstance connected with the Insti- 
tute, The character and diversity of the diseases which carried than 
off, forbid the slightest apprehension upon this ground. 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Of the improvement of our pupils in their various school exercises, 
we are strU able to give a satisfactory account, though it must be 
admitted that their progress has been somewhat retarded by the dim- 
inution of our corps of Instructors, about the middle of the last ses- 
sion. We were in cithsequence obliged to combine classes of differ- 
ent grades, which not only made them too large for efficient Instruc- 
tion, but at the same time kept the more advanced scholars from 
progressing as they should have done. 

The changing of teachers in a school like ours, even where their 
qoalificntions are equal, is always to be deprecated; for the ne« 
ones must, necessarily labor under no little disadvantage in impart- 
ing instruction, before they have time to become acquainted with the 
peculiar talents and acquirements of their pupils; but when, as is 
most generally the case, they have had no previous experience in the 
training of blind children, the loss of time is far greater. It is well 
understood, that for success in any department of the profession of 
teaching, much experience is needed, and in ours,tbis is pre-eminent* 
ly the case; for though there is no intrinsic defect in the mental 
structure, consequent upon the absence of sight, there exist, never- 
theless, many obstacles to the perfect development of some of the 
faculties, which obstacles must be appreciated, to be removed, and 
studied to be appreciated. There are also many irregular tenden- 
cies to be guarded against, many acquired peculiarities to be over- 
come; all of which require much time and experience for the proper 
understanding of them. If the imparting of knowledge, in some few 
branches of Science or Literature, were all that is to be done, the 
Mcessary preparation for the work would be, comparatively unim- 



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21 

porfant, wmi appvopriata salactioxn of teacharg more easily made. 
Bat it is quite obTknis, that the teacher's duty does not end here, and 
that higher qualifications are needed for success as an efficient labor- 
er ia oor cause* 

The design of these hints is to call your attention to the high im- 
portanca of selecting for officers of the Institute, such only as possess 
undoubted ability* and who will enter upon the work with a heart- 
felt determination to devote their whole time and energies to it; for 
these only are fit to engage in it There are, as you are doubtless 
aware, many persons who adopt teaching as a temporary means of 
support, using it as a stepping-stone to some other professiont and it 
need hardly be remarked, that such have not sufficient interest in 
the business, to make them truly useful. 

About the same routine of study, labor, and recreation, as hereto- 
fore reported, has been pursued during the year just closed. In this 
order our constant aim has been, to so combine their manual and 
intellectual exercises, and intersperse them with hours of recreation, 
as to produce a harmonious development of both the mental and 
physical natures. Nor is the moral being overlooked in our plan of 
education. On the contrary, every pains is taken to prevent the 
formation of, or continuation in, improper habits of any kind, and to 
cultivate in our pupils, a high sense of their moral obligations. In- 
deed, we would deem any scheme of education defective, which did 
not have reference to the three-fold nature of man. 



MUSIC. 

In the Science and Practice of music, our scholars are, through 
the indefatigable labors of their excellent instructor, making most 
commendable advancement. The band, comprising some ten or 
twelve performers, is beginning to execute, in a creditable manner, 
some quite difficult compositions, while the choir, consisting of al- 
most the entire school, has been taught to perform with equal taste 
and skill, a goodly variety of Choruses, Anthems, Glees, etc., from 
the most approved authors. As favorable an account may also be 
given of the Piano Forte Scholars, of whom there are, at this time, 
ten or twelve. Several of them, indeed, have advanced sufficiently 
to commence a course of instruction upon the organ ; and as it is 
our design to prepare these for organbts and teachers of music, it is 



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much to h% regretted that we have not an inatrumMit of this Iriod for 
them to practice opoD. It is presumed, however, that upon tlie 
completion of our main building, where there will be a snitable room 
provided for it, you will adopt early measures to supply this defi* 
ciency. 

Besides their instruction in the practice of Music, an advanced 
class have been receiving lessons in Thorough Bass, and Composition. 
The members of this class have likewise made gratifying progress. 

We would not have you underrate the importance of this branch 
in the education of the Blind. Be it what it may to the Seeing, it h 
to those who are shut out from the visible beauties of creation, an 
invaluable accomplishment, whether we regard it as an available 
means of obtaining an honorable independence, or as a refiner of 
the affections, and a source of innocent recreation — we speak not of 
its abuse. As the visible world, with all its pleasing varieti^ ot 
form, its endless combinations, and beautiful blendings of light and 
shade, is to the soul that is permitted to look out upon it, and feel iti 
refining, nay, its regenerating influences, so is the world of sound to 
him who is denied the contemplation of these beauties. '*Ia the va- 
ried stream of warbling melody,** as it winds its way, in graceful 
meanderings to the deep recesses of bis soul, **or of rich and bound- 
less harmony, as it swells and rolls its pompous tide around him,** he 
finds a solace and a compensation for the absent joys of sight. Con- 
sequently, the educated blind musician becomes enthusiastic in his 
admiration of the Science and Art of Music. "Secluded ever from 
the joys of vision, he seeks for consolation here. Oft, in the pensive 
musings of his active mind, when lonely and retired, he contemplates 
the excellence of music, and seeks the sources of its powerful channs. 
He runs through the nice gradations, and minute divisions of its 
scale, and fancies an unlimited extent, in gravity and acuteness, be- 
yond the reach of all perception : — thence he traverses the rich and 
devious maze of combinations which result from harmony, and all 
its complicated evolutions — the soft and loud, the mingling light and 
shade of music — the swelling and decreasing tones, which form the 
®rial tracery and fading tints of just perspective— all are to him» the 
body, color, strength and outline, which compose the vivid picture 
his imagination has created. He ponders next upon the various 
sounds produced in nature : from the soft and balmy whisper of the 
vernal breeze, to the loud pealings of the deep-toned thunder, heard 



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amid the inrailings of the fiercely raging storm. Lost in the tumult 
of his strong emotions, he exclaims : ^<Wbat is there in the wide ere- 
ation so sublime, magnificent or beautilul, as sound?' ^ 

In saying thus much upon the subject of Music, we would not be 
understood as advocating its culture to the exclusion of other more 
substantial studies; we would use it as an auxiliary only, to the in- 
tellectual department of instruction, except with the few who are to 
depend upon it as a means of support. 

In addition to the Literary classes heretofore reported, we organ- 
ized, at the commencement of the present session, one for the study 
of the German Language. Our reason for so doing is two-fold ; 
first, in consequence of the rapid increase of the German population 
in this section of the country, it is being introduced into very many 
of our best schools for the Seeing; and, secondly, because it will 
greatly facilitate the acquisition of fluency in the use of the English 
Language. In view of the difiiculties which beset the path of the 
blind student, in attaining to a free and correct use of language, this 
last consideration is one of no little importance. From the interest 
manifested, and the attainments made thus far, we have reason to 
expect that thb class will do well. 

Appended to this report, will be found a specimen of poetical com- 
position by one of our female pupils. In addition to the interest ari- 
sing out of its intrinsic merit, the pleasure of its perusal will doubt- 
less be enhanced by the fact of its having been dictated, as are all 
the writings of the authoress, to a deaf amanuensis, by means of the 
manuel alphabet, used by deaf mates. This amannensis is her sister, 
and a pupil of our State Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb. We have 
also added one from a collection of poems, published by a graduate 
of the New York Institution for the Blind, which, we think, will be 
read with interest 



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WORK DEPARTMENT, 

For an account of the operations of the Work Department, since 
the issuing of our last Report, we would refer you to the following 
Table of articles manufactured, together with the exhibit of the re- 
ceipts and expenditures. The latter shows, as usual, the gratifying 
result of a balance in favor of the department, notwithstanding the 
cost of instruction, waste of material by beginners, and other draw- 
backs incident to work-shops like ours* 

LIST OF ARTICLES MANUFACTURED, 
From November 1^, 1849, to November Ist, 1850. 




2332 
12 
30 
374 
43 
29 
12 

I 
13 

2 
12 

1 



4 

126 

138 

196 

23 

9 

4 

7 

"sot 



Hair Brushes, 

Shoe Brushes, 

Fle^ Brushes,* •••••• 

Hat & Cloth Brushes,* 

Clothes Brushes, 

Hat Brushes, 

Horse Brushes, 

Crumb Brushes, 

Dentist Brush, 

Dusting Brushes, 

Sweeping Brushes,* • • • 

Clamp Scrubs, 

Brush Repaired, 



WILLOW-WORK. 

Cradles, 

Wagons, 

Market Baskets, 

School Baskets, t 

Sewing Baskets, f 

Clothes Baskets, 

Reticules, 

Baskets Repaired 



$39345 



$446 08 



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lAft of ArHeles Manufactured— Continued. 



Nujnber. 



47 

24 

{2415 

2486 

3 



463 

63 

1 

1 



4 
3 
4 
1 

7l 



33 

10 

49 

9 

100 



BBOOm. 



Whinks, 

Hearth Brooms, . • 
Swoefnng Brooms, 



Yards Garpiet Weaving,- 
Chairs Bottomed, 



BB&D irOBK. 



Baskets, 

Necklaces^' > > 
Toy Bonnet,. 
Toy Pitcher,. 



unmiio. 



Tidies,.. 

Purses, 

Pairs of Socks,* 
Bag, 



BBPHTR WORK. 

Lamp Stands, ■ 

BBAIOIIfO. 

WatchGuard, 

riAUf SBWIKC. 



Sheets,. 

Pairs Pillow Cases,* 

Towels, 

Aprons, 



Amount. 



$348 60 



86 49 
1 00 



136 85 



9 85 



.4 10 



23 



•7 35 



Total value of articles manufactured,- '191,433 9? 



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Statement of the Busineu of the Work Department, from N&vatJfer 
\st, 1849, to November \st, 1850. 

CR. 

By cash raceived for Brushes during the year* 311 75 

By cash received for Willow Work, 310 49 

By cash received for Brooms, 251 56 

By cash received for Carpet and Carpet weaving, 83 14 

By cash received for Mattresses, 36 83 

By cash received for Mats, .3 35 

By cash received for Chairs bottomed, 1 00 

By cash received for Girls' Work, 179 H 

By vakie of Brushes on hand, Nov. Ist, 1850, 254 80 

By value of Willow Work on hand, 335 75 

By value of Brooms on hand, 45 50 

By value of Carpeting on hand, 5 65 

By value of Girls' Work on hand, 7 95 

By value of Brushes in hands of Agents, 86 S9 

By value of Willow Work in hands of agents, 13 40 

By amountdue for Brushes sold on credit, 122 83 

By amount due for Willow Work sold on credit, 13 10 

By amountdue for Broorcs sold on credit, 20 03 

By value of Brush material on band Nov. 1st, 1850,. 211 35 

By value of Willow Work material on hand, 128 00 

By value of Broom material on hand, • 197 36 

By value of Carpet materiaJ on hand, ^ 95 50 

By value of Mat material on hand, 16 00 

By value of Girls' work material on hand, 86 46 

By value of Brushes rec'd by pupils for over-work,' • . • 79 53 



$3,796 53 
DR. 



To value of raw material for Boys' work, on hand 

November 1st, 1850, 531 30 

To value of raw material for Girls' work on hand 

* November 1st, 1850, 56 95 

To value of Boys' work on hand, Nov.lst, 1849, 313 15 

To value of Girls' work on hand,Nov. 1st, 1849,. . . -11 70 
To amount due for articles sold on credit, Nov. 1st. 

^ 1849, 4854 

To cash paid for Brush material during the year,. -302 86 

To cash paid for Willow work material, 265 40 

To cash paid for Broom material, 316 30 

To cash paid for Carpet material, 137 21 



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SlaiemetU of the Funitets of ike Wert Jkpariment^CcnHnMed. 

DIL 
To cash paid for Mattress material during the year, • • 16 87 

To cash paid for Mat material, 3 00 

To cash paid for Girls' work material, .80 25 

To cash paid for instruction in handicraft, • -SS? 50 

To cash paid for labor on Brooms, 31 09 

To cash paid for labor on Baskets, • 12d 97 

To cash paid for miscellaneous labor, 80 00 

To value of overwork done by pupils, paid in brushes, • 79 53 

2,741 «8 

$54 91 



In the foregoing exhibit, the balance in favor of the shop is not so 
large as that of either of the previous years. This does not arise 
however, from a less amount of business having been done; but prin- 
cipally from the following circumstances : first, there was an omis- 
sion of sixty dollars and thirty-five cents in the account of last year, 
which is included in the above; secondly, there has been an increase 
m the expenditure for instruction, amounting to ninety dollars and 
ninety cents ; and thirdly, there has been charged to the department 
the sum of eighty dollars, for labor, which, under the old arrange^ 
meat, would have been performed by the Steward. These several 
rams added together, will nearly make the difference. 

In all our previous reports, we have given, as above, an exhibit of 
the combined operations of our several industrial branches ; but in 
order that you may be better able to compare the results of the dif- 
ferent trades, we will hereafter make a separate statement of the 
condition of each. And in conformity with this design, we present 
this year, the following abstract of the business operations of the d^ 
partment from the commencement, arranged and classified as in the 
manner proposed* 



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SicttemetU tfihe Businets of the Wsrt Department fivm tie Opetdng 
of the Institute, to November Ist, 1850. 



BKU8HBS. 



Amount r«c'd for manufactured articles 
Value of manufactured articles on hand 

Value of materials an hand 

Value of brushes received by pupils for 

overwork, 

Value of tools and fixtures on hand, 
Value of debts due for manufactured 

articles, 



Deduct amount expended for tools and 

fixtures, 

Deduct amount expended for material, 

Deduct amount paid in brushes for over 

work by pupils, 



wna/m wo&k. 

Amount received for manufactured ar- 
ticles, 

Value of manufactured articles on hand. 

Value of material on hand, 

Value of tools and fixtures on hand,* 
Value of debts due for willow work» 



Deduct amount expended for tools and 
fi^ctures, 

Deduct amount expended for raw ma^ 
terial, 

Deduct amount expended for labor,* 



MATTRESSBS. 



Amount received for mattresses,* • • « 
Value of tools and fixtures on hand,* 



DR. 



368 50 
852 53 

211 40 



80 37 

701 98 
212 14 



CR. 



570 56 
341 09 
211 25 

211 40 
368 50 

122 83 



1825 63 



1432 43 



740 11 

349 IS 

128 00 

80 37 

13 10 



1310 73 



994 49 



394 32 
6 00 



400 32 



90 



316 24 



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Statement of tke Butinett of the Work Department from the opening 
of the Institute to Nnember let 1850— Contintud. 



KATTBnsiH — Continued. 



DR. 



CR. 



Deduct amovnt expended for material 
Deduct amount expended for tools and 

fixtures, 

Deduct amount expended for lab<Hr> 



195 87 

6 00 
51 50 



CABPCT AND MAT WKATIRQ. 

Am'nt rec'd for manufactured articles, 
Value of carpeting and mats on hand. 

Value of material on hand, 

Value of tools and fixtures on hand, 



Deduct amount expended for tools and 
fixtures, 

Deduct amount expended for raw ma 
terial, 



35 94 
194 72 



BBOOIIS. 

Am'nt rec'd for manufactured articles. 
Value of manufactured articles on hand 

Value of material on hand, 

Value of tools and fixtures on hand, 
Vahie of debts due for brooms,* • • • 



Deduct amount expended for tools and 
fixtures, 

Deduct amount expended for raw ma 
terial, ■ 

Deduct amount expended for labor,* ' 



49 55 

500 50 
31 09 



353 37 



98 08 

5 65 

111 50 

35 94 



251 17 



330 66 



313 09 
45 50 

197 36 
49 55 
20 03 



625 52 



581 14 



146 95 



20 51 



44 38 



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Statement afthe Business of the Work Department from the opening 
of the Institute^ to November 1st, 1850— Continued. 



OIRUB* WORK. 



Am*nl rec'd for manuractured articles, 
Value of manufactured articles on hand 

Value of material on hand, 

Value of tools and fixtures on hand, 



Deduct amount expended for tools and 
fixtures, 

Deductamount expended forraw ma 
terial, 



DR. 



6 59 
213 45 



CR. 



500 47 

7 95 

86 46 

6 59 



601 47 



S90 04 



381 48 

#1303 71 



Inasmuch as there has been no account made of the labor of the 
pupils, in the foregoing table, this balance of one thousand three hun- 
dred and two dollars, and seventy-one cents, may be regarded as a 
remuneration for the same. A large portion of it, however, has been 
expended for instruction in handicraft. 

In the early history of any manufacturing establishment, before 
experience has pointed out the means of procuring apparatus and ma- 
terial to the best advantage, and before a market has been opened for 
the ready disposal of its products on favorable terms, it necessarily 
has many disadvantages to contend against. Making due allowance 
for these, in connection with the other drawbacks heretofore hinted 
at as incident to establishments like ours, we have abundant reason to 
considerthis department in a prosperous condition. At all events, 
we do not fear a comparison of its results with those of any similar es- 
tablishment, during the first three years of its existence. 

From the favorable issue of our experiment in the manufacture of 
com brooms, we have no hesitation in recommending its continuance 
as one of the principal branches of our industrial department. The 



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31 

ease with which it is acquired, by the aid of the machine referred to 
in our last annual report, the small cost of the necessary outfit, in the 
way of apparatus, the facility with which material may be procured 
in any part of the country, and, above all, the ready market every 
where found for the disposal of stocic, recommend this trade to the 
bVnd mechanic, as tiie most reliable one that experience has yet sug- 
gested. Such, indeed, is the simplicity of the operation, that but 
tew will be found unable to learn it. The pecuniary result, however, 
is the proper test of its value ; and of this we may form some judg* 
mentfrom the following statement: A good hand, working indus* 
triously, can make some two dozen brooms per day, such as we sell 
at an average price of one dollar and seventy-five cents per dozen. 
Now supposing the cost of the material consumed in making these 
brooms, to be two dollars, that is for forty pounds of corn, at four 
cents per pound ; two dozen handles at one and a fourth cents a 
piece; and for twine ten cents, the net profit on a day's work will be 
one dollar and fifty cents. If the workman is so situated as to be able 
to raise his own corn, instead of paying for it at the rate of eighty dol- 
lars per ton, his earnings will be correspondingly increased. This a- 
mount is of course subject to some reduction on account of shop rent, 
and other incidental expenses, but we believe it to be a fair estimate. 

The business has so far yielded but a small profit to the Institute ; 
but this is no more than we had a right to expect from its being an 
entirely new one with us. 

Several of our young men who left us at the close of the last ses- 
sion are about making a trial of the business on their own account, 
and we hope to be able in our next report to give an encouraging 
statement of their success. Besides these, Mr. W. G. Yates, a for- 
mer pupil of the New York Institution for the Blind, who was em- 
ployed during the last two sessions as an assistant in the willow 
department of our establishment, having learned the broom-making 
while with us, has already established himself in the business in our 
city, and is apparently doing very well. 

Of the other trades, the brush-making in particular, we cannot 
speak so favorably; mainly, on account of the difiiculty met with, 
in disposing of the manufactured articles. The demand for these is 
not so general nor so steady as that for brooms, and there are proba- 
bly but few blind mechanics who are able to bear a heavy accumu- 
lation of stock. 



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38 

In most of the older institutions, there has of late been felt, Rioch 
discouragement on the account of the heavy accumulation of mann- 
factured articles in their ware-rooms, they having been unable to 
dispose of them as fast as they have been produced. It has been 
found too» that the shops do not yield sufficient profit, independent 
of this cause to justify them in the expectation that their pupils will 
find the trades learned a reliable means of support after leaving 
school. In short, they have found the mechanical department rather 
a burden than otherwise, and have been induced to persevere only 
by the conviction, that this is their main source of hope for the inde- 
pendence of the Blind. 

We have not yet felt this difficulty to any serious extent; bat 
from the experience of others, have no right to expect exemption, 
while we continue to follow their system of management* We 
know not that a better one can be devised, all things considered, but 
are willing to ofier a few suggestions for your consideration. 

In reflecting upon this subject, the thought has often occurred to 
us, that if private individuals can make the manufacture of brushes, 
baskets, mattresses, brooms, foot mats, carpeting, &c. yield them a 
profit after paying for the labor expended upon them, surely our 
institutions whose inmates are acknowledged to make those articles 
as well as others, ought to do so, when no account is made of the 
labor of the workmen. The fact that they do not, would seem to 
arise from one or both of these causes: either we are pursuing an 
imperfect system, or the work shops are under the cliarge of persons 
possessing very poor business qualifications; for the ordinary expla* 
nation, that it is in consequence of the unavoidable waste of mate- 
rial and cost of instruction, is not to us a satisfactory one. 

With regard to the prevailing system of management, we would 
remark that we consider it defective in thb important particular, 
that the business concerns of this department, are managed by 
salaried officers, instead of those who are personally interested in its 
pecuniary results as is the case with all private establishments, 
With those who are conversant with the history of public works in 
this or any other State, no other argument is necessary to demon- 
strate the superiority of the latter over the former system than a 
reference to their experience. We would not be understood to attri- 
bute a want of proper interest to persons engaged in this or any 
other institution. We only wish to express the conviction that if 



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33 

mast^ iiopcl>9iiuc9 in our institutions , were perspnaliy interested 
in the profits of the wprks^ps, we would be more likely to 
procure the, services of responsible men wlko have learned the trades 
regularly a,Qd thoroughly in all ^heir details, oMteriai would be pur* 
chased and used more economically, the wai:eat would be made bet- 
ter and faster, and stock would not be allowefl U> accymulate upon 
oiirhaivb* The ground of this belief will appear hereafter. This 
is not « mere fancy of ours, for the principle is underatood and acted 
upon hy the bgsifiaqe community throughout the world. 

Another disf^tivB principle is, (and this arises out of the present 
Qi^profitahl^ess of the workshops,) that of throwing the responsi- 
bility of purehasing material atyl selling stock upon the Superintend* 
eatSk insteed of , employing competent mechanics or tradesman, who 
are well vetBed in the practical details of business operations. It is 
tfua» we have meebenics as the immediate supenrisors of the handi* 
craft de^artmeolSf but there is liule. or no respo^ibility vested in 
tkem; nor have they. time consisteniiy with their duties in the shppa 
to devote to the mercantile aflTairs of the eatabUsbinfnJU sifiee these 
uaUke other shops are filled with apprentices instead of joofaeymen 
who roqnimjLbeif constant pr^eei^ for inatrmtionaiMid gpvernment 
Now it k at. fact generally understood and wdmiltf^d, thftl fiien who 
gm their priaetpal atteotioi^ to litemry and Ig^ientifio matters, and 
such only are fit fior the office of SttperioHendeitti jm^ seldom fowd 
to be officiont hasiaeBs men. The sphere of actioo». the tastest and 
in (act 4he whole anaedations of the schobr are eo widely di^^ot 
from those of the mechanic or tradesman, that it is next to impoM**^ 
ble to find a man in whom the tvso characters are so oombined as 
to render htm practieaUy asei\il in a dooble eapadty. And even . 
were it otherwise, the multifarious duties, r^obv and tacideDtal, 
connected with the edneatiehal department of an instiUitsDa iisr the . 
Blind are such, that a proper diicharge «f them doaa wA leave the; 
Soperintendent time to atMid even to the geneeal comoqsb of tfaa 
industrial department. 

In a word, if we would compete soccessTuHy la she manubotwe^ 
snd sate of any class of goods, with establishflsents, owMd and. 
managed as individual enterprises, we mast be goveraed by ihe 
principles which have been arrived at by these ealaUisbnMSits after 
k>ag ages of experience, which can only be done by converting oar > 
maaofactoriog interests into jndividt^l enterpraaai ao lo 4peak, or if 
m fail of flMceas* most not complain. 



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34 

It cannot be dented, that there are some parts, even of the siinple 
trades taught in our institutions, which are executed foy the Blind 
under great disadvantage; and one of the good results to be ex- 
pected from the proposed change, is the confining of their attention 
to those parts which they can perform most successfnlly, or io otlier 
word5 the introduction of the principle of division of labor; for the 
master mechanic, with his perceptions quickened by self-interest, 
would soon discover these and avail himself of the principle alluded 
to, giving the difficult parts to seeing persons. Sendee, he woold be 
able by the same means, to introduce some new trades, thm eAlaig- 
ing the field of the blind workman and enabling him in many 
instances to make a better selection of employments. But it may 
be objected that this would restrict their knowledge, and prevent 
their learning the whole of any trade; to this we would reply, that 
if seeing mechanics find it necessary to confine themselves to one 
branch of a certain trade, so much the more necessary is it for blind 
ones to do so. The trudi is, we have attempted too much aod fiuJed. 
Wt must now go back, and commence again with new priacipks 
su^ested by our experience. 

In carrying oot the plan hinted at, there wouU deobtieeB be aooie 
diActtUiea met with, aririog out of the separate btetesta of die 
mister mechanic ftx>m those ef the Institution, endi for instance as 
the proper regulation of the kind of occupation for each pupil* and 
the lime te be deveied to the workshops. Nevertheless with judi* 
cious restrlctionst these obstacles might surely be overcome. It is at 
least worth, a trial, as the oM plan seems, in a great nieaswe to have 
hfML 

GonsidemUe discussion has Uken place within the last few yean, 
among the older iasliiutions of our country, upon ibe oeoeasity of a 
** Home for the Industrious Blind,^ in connection with eecb educa- 
tional institution, which shall have tot its object, the furnishiog of 
sleady eonployaneet to iu graduate pnpiis, together with comfortable 
boarding at meh niee as their small earnings may enable them te 
pay. Thb necessity, they conceive to be forced upon them by the 
fiatere of their graduates to meet their expectations in the way of 
selfHttaiDtenance, when thrown entirely upon their own resources. 
Indeedi the managers of the New York Institution have progressed 
se'iar in this work as to have erected a largp brick building for this 
express object; ^bHe those of the New England and Pennsylvania 
Institotiens^have taken some incipient steps towards the same end. 



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Than a«» nniiy aigofeiMU wUmeti^ f«r and Hgiink fk4 bigtttiia- 
tioD oT tUt snpplMMttlary ddptrUMDW ia tin late repoitt of tlia 
abore namad iostiltttioost yat thtif all aaaoi to agrae in tbe opiaioiii 
that tlia wanla of tha aduoatedl BKod demand it« As a diftcusMM of- 
tba aubgact haia, at tha pitmt paiiod of tha history of our iostilotef 
would aaem to ba pramatarat we would ntpactfolly lefer yoa lo 
tbaie ra^art0» and raoomoMiid their perusal. We would siq^geat 
however, that through an anxiety to demonstrate fully the necessity 
of this step, there has been in sums ioetaaces, a disposition maat^ 
fssted to underrate the aotuai aUKty of the Blind for self-main- 
tenanoeu . Now we would by no means wish to disgobe either from' 
themselves or the puUic, that Uindness is a misfortoDe; but we think 
it doe to bmb, that the matter should be discussed soberly and im- 
partially, with a strict adherence to known facts, and with a wining« 
nsss to set aside all themy and speculation. The Btind surely have 
enough toeoatend with in ^ The Battle of Life'' upon their entrance 
iato its strife without having their miMb prepared liefore hand to 
expect defiat Lei ue rather point out only the real difficulties, and 
by keeling before their view the inestimable value of the priie for 
which they uvt eontanding, stimuhte them to energetic and perse- 
vering eSiMrt* 

While it may be inexpedient for us to enter directly into a discos- • 
sion of the merits of the question, as to whether the supplementary 
establishment alluded to is necessary or not, and if so, how it should 
be organized and conducted, we may with propriety examine the 
Mtgbi cause of this necessity, with a view to its removal, wholly, 
or in part, if possible; and by so doing, defer the evil for a time at 
least so far as the Indiana Institution is concerned. We call it an 
evil, because it is admitted to be such on all hands, both on account 
of the expense, and of the prejudicial effect to be apprehended from . 
such a permanent congregation of blind adults, upon their own , 
moral and social affections. The proposition may be stated as fol- . 
lows: 

Thoi:^ the inmates of ogr several institutions are taught tbor- , 
ougbly in the knowledge of certain mechanical branches, yet they 
fail, with |few exceptions, to make this knowledge available as a 
means of subsistence after leaving school, in oonseqoence of their 
inability to manage their general business concerns, particularly the 
purchase of material and the sale of their stock. 



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pf)#ntiees miih 4h«t or ttoing oms* ati4 te« wbedwr in tM* retpect 
tlMiy are. equal cmnpetitort» or in otiwr words, whether their tramiB;- 
i( seqiiaUy thorough. The latter enter upon tbeUr appreaticeeliip, as 
a gaaeral thiag^ with tons^ eiferieace m the use df toob, and wilh 
nuere or l^m cultivation <if their maniial pcrareri, derived from the 
(Hrdioary occupations and sports of yoiHh; and as thefar empiofsis 
are interested in the product of their labor, they era provided wMb 
es^ery means of lacilitatiog their progresst while, being oUigod to 
we^js. late and early, they are taxed to the utmost of their ability, 
which of comw rapidly develops their powers and increases tlieir 
dexterity in the use of tools. The former, on the contrary, ha^o not 
tine. benefit of this early preparation, for they have ttevor 
allowed to handle tools, or to unite-in those esoploymesU and 
timss which have tended to develop the powers of the easing yosHh; 
apd while acquiring their trades in institution^ dwy have not the 
saine efficient trainifi^ in several partiouters; first, their time and 
attention are divided between their work and tiieir atudtasi beJag 
expected to acquire both education and trades in about the apaoo of 
time which is usually devojedio the latter; secondly, tbsy are not, 
under the present system, provided with the same facilities, Aot rs- 
quired to labor as industriously, or to. execute their work as well as 
if their instructors were to profit or lose by their labor; and thirdly, 
such is the gepius of our institutions, that the sympathies of the 
officers and of the community will not allow them to be subjected 
to that rigid course of treatment which gives physical endurance to 
the seeing mechanic. Now if these things are true, and we feel 
confident that they will be admitted to be so, excepting in a few re- 
markable instances, by all of experience in this work, can we say that 
our graduates have been made thorough mechanics? Again, let us 
examine why those who form the exceptions, so generally fail to 
maintain themselves by means of their trades. We doubt not that 
a satisfactory explanation of this, may be found in the want of a 
proper development of those powers which form a sturdy, energetic 
character and induce a feeling of self-relfaince; for we are not among 
those who associate with the loss of sight, a necessary or intrinsc 
iriTerrority of mental and physical constitution, because of the occa- 
sional connection of the two as eflects of a common cause. Where 
bRnd persons have succeeded, it will be found that their opportuni- 
ties for the kind of culture alluded to, have invariably been <Bfferent 



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37 

from tliMeof tin mass. In order to mtke oofseivto batter und«^« 

Bloodf Mam us to traoo briefly tke history of a blind cblld» es iMi li 

ordinarily woiimstanced. Bom with bis infirmity, or losing h1i» 

•igiii ia childhood, he is eariy taught the lesson of dependence by hk 

anxious and too indulgent parents, who, while his nK>re fortilnais 

Gompaniaos are allowed to ro^tm the fiolds and woods in gleesome 

frdic» or join in the woatedt invigoratiii^ sports of youth* confine 

him to the chimney corner, or at most the liiuited range of the door 

yard, lest some barm may befal him. Ue is seldom allowed to act or 

eren to think for himaelf, for bis every waat iis anticipated^ He is 

eonstmutly reminded of his misfortune by being told ia |4tying ae- 

eenlB, of the beauty and subUmity of the earth bMeaitb with lis 

endless vsuriety and combioations of form and color, upon which all 

may gaze but hinisel( or of the heavens above, whose myriads of 

diiniag worlds shed in vain for him their brilliant rays, and traverse 

the limitless regions of space in matchless harmony ; and rendeivd 

oiorbidly sensitive by the ill judged remarks made in bis presence by 

those who forget that he tias ea^ to hear, or a: heart to feel. He is 

indulged in every whim or caprice, and ilUowed to commit with im* 

punity, a thousand acts for which another child wouU be puaished. 

While the com panioAs of his youth are sent to sdiool, oraree»- 

g^ed in aome useful occupation, he is taught 10 regard himself ae 

incapacitaled for ^iher, anid ia left to brood over hb deprivation with 

serious distrust of the justice and mercy of a God, ^ho permits him 

to be thus afflicted without apparent cause. 

He is at last sent, with many misgivings on the part of his pai«att, 
as to the kind of treatment he is likely to meet with from the hands 
of Btraagsrs, to an iastltution for education, whero it is oKpeoted thai 
he will be fitted for successful competition with his early aseooialsfe 
ia the strtiggle for iadepeodetice. And need we say, that be isosa- 
Bienees his school career in a condition far different from that of the 
seeing scholar t That his bodily and mental powers are comparaUy^ 
dormant, if not potttively injured from want of exercise, that he is 
a prey to despondency, with sensibilities painfully acute, and dispo- 
sition soured by excessive indulgence, and that be lacks that sturdy 
selt«reliance which belongs to other youths of the same age? The 
truth is, he has learned to regard himself as a poor unfortuaale, 
who must not put forth a single effort of body or mind to help hioir 
ssli; and therefore feeU that it is the busiaeas of the rest of the woild 



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lo minifftflr to bis comfort tad pbasora. And allow tur to amy in tlw 
»^ami«etiont tiiai in the rtCbrniatHNi of hb clMiimetor in this raspeeli 
JtonmtM the most diiBcull and laborous part of his iMtraetor^s laboia. 
Jt U moreover, Uie moet important; for until this Is ofibctody bat lil* 
tie progress can be nuida in the acquisition of knowledge. 

But to return, in doe course of time our hero has completod iw 
stiidies; his intellect has been cultivated and stored with knowledge, 
he has learned a trade; he has acquired better use of his physical 
powers and is comparatively independent ; he is no longer the de- 
spondent bein^ that he was, but Ms heart is cheered and elated with 
hope. He is in truth transformed, and such a reaction has takes 
place in his feelings under the influence of his institution associatioBs, 
that he has forgotten his affliction, and even dreams that his depriva- 
tion gives him superiority over other men — Happy being! WouM 
that this spell were destined never to be broken by the stem reality 
of thy situation. 

Pidl of confident expectation, be bids adieu to the happy scenes 
and associates of his late home, and launches his bark upon the sea 
of life, but alas I It founders in the first billow that intercepts its 
oourse. He has failed just where almost any other person with 
even inferior education and skill in his trade, would have been sac- 
eessful, and must fall back disconsolate upon his friends or upon his 
I*' Alma Mater," thus assisting to create a necessity for the estsUisb* 
4nent spoken of above; or V neither of these resources is open to 
him, adopts some itinerant profession for which he is but poorly 
jltted, and which ia still less adapted lo him* 

But why did he not succeed? Simply because, despite his school 
education and qualifications as a mechanic, he is still a child in 
knowledge of the ways of the world, his character is yet undeveloped, 
so fiir as concerns those faculties which produce energy, self-reliance 
and endurance. His institution training has been but little better 
in this respect, than his home training. Cut off from all business 
connection with the ontward world, during the years precedti^ 
maturity, when the character should be forming, and all his wants 
being supplied without the cost of a single thought on his part, what 
means has he had for the cultivation of those traits which constitute 
true manliness t There are doubtless but few, who reflect upon the 
depressing influences of eleemosynary aid upon the characters of rb 
sedpieBts. The experienced directors however, of cliaritable iastK 



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39 

tutioQs of anj kiivdy will recognize in it the source of nearly all the 
diacaatont and insubordination of tbeir inmates. 

It has not been our design in the foregoing remarks, to discourage 
the •flforta now bttng made for the founding of these supplementary 
iDatitutions. We have wished, simply* to direct your attention to 
the cause, which in the present state of things, makes snoh a step 
desirable, in the hope that some way may be devised to overcome 
this difficulty, at least in part* Could thb be done, all must agree 
that it would be incalculably better than to take measures for aug* 
menting the evil, which would be the inevitable result of such es* 
tablish meats. Asa member of the class whose cause the writer is 
advocating, he would say, most emphatically, give us independence, 
though it may be in a sphere the most humble ; enable us to feel our* 
selves as men amongst men, though it may cost us many a discom* 
fort, to pass through the ordeal which is to confer this ability. Life 
is at best, but a wearisome pilgrimage, and he who has the heaviest 
burden to bear, roust nerve himself the stronger for the task, and 
meet his destiny with resignation. Those of our class who have 
succeeded in surmounting the heavy pressure of their surrounding 
circumstances, have not been able, you may be assured, to do so 
without indomitable perseverance. It is truly no easy task to over- 
come the natural inward misgivings, and stem the torrent of public 
distrust. 

Before dismissmg this subject, permit us to express more fully the 
conviction hialed at, in the course of the foregoing remarks, thai 
tb^re has hitherto been manifested, in some, at least, of our institik 
tions, as well as with the parents of their pupils, too much slackaeas 
of discipline. It is, withoot doubt, difficult for instructors to over* 
come their natural sympathies, and equally hard for pupils to submil 
cheerfully, to rigid government; but if such is essential to thoroogd 
education, there must be no flinching from duty on the part of either 
teachers or scholars. If it is necessary for others to bend their en* 
tire energies to the pursuit of some one definite object, in order to at* 
tain to proficiency, it is clearly so, in a higher degree, for Blind per* 
sons. This yielding to their desire to change from one thing to an* 
other, is the most fruitful source of the inefficiency complained of. 
Likewise the attempt to take those through a literary course, who 
enter institutions after arriving nearly or quite to maturity, however 
aiuch it may accord with our feelings of kindness, is another source 



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40 

of inofficieacy ; because more is undertaken than can be accomplish- 
ed. It is tMy as much as such can do, to learn a trade in tb^ abort 
tintie they are willing to remain at school. Wero more attenticm 
l^ven to these matters^ we would have among our gradualaB» more 
industrious meohanics* and fewer solicitors of alms,, under cover cf 
concert-giving, lecturing and autobiography-wfiung. Allosiaii is 
made to those only who are unfit for these occupations* 

The practice which prevails in most of the institutions, of keeping 
some of their pupils during the vacations, instead of returning them 
to theirfriends, also comes in for its share of the responsibility of per- 
petuating the evil under notice. It undoubtedly has its origin in be- 
nevolence, as this class are mostly destitute of comfortable homes, 
compared with those afforded by the institutions ; but we cannot, 
with justice, call that benevolence which produces evil, rather than 
good, to its object. Instances are not unfrequent, however, in which 
pupils are permitted to remain, because their friends fail to proiide 
a way for Xhetti to go home. Our own practice has hitherto been, to 
require all to leave, even though we have been obliged in some cases 
to bear their tiavelling expenses. Where they are without parents, 
we send them to some near relative; or where they have been coun- 
ty charges, we return them to the county officei*s, to be provided for 
during the vacations. Even though we should be obliged to pay for 
the boarding of such out of the institution, we would conceive it to 
be better for them, than to retain them in it. The design of our in- 
^Mittitions is not to provide atyloms for the Blind, but to edoeate 
Ihenn with the expectation that they will i*eturn to the hoUom of so- 
^ety, and take their places as useful citizens, so far as possible. Is it 
not better then, that they should keep up their acquaintance with the 
outward world ? It most certainly is, and particularly with that part 
of it which is to be their future home. There are many other rea- 
tons why this practice is objectionable, but they are too obvious to 
Heed mention here. 

But while we would fain throw out a few suggestions for the con- 
sideration of the conductors of our several institutions, we would by 
no means overlook the duty which devolves upon parents in this mat- 
ter. They have much, very much, to do in this proposed reforma- 
tion ; for, while they continue to rear their children in the erroneous 
manner described, and to keep them at home in idleness during their 
best days for instruction, the efforts of the educator will be compara- 



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41 

y 

lively futile. No blind child should be kept from school after arriv- 
ing at hb twelfth year ; and if he can be sent as early as nine or 
ten, it will be still better. The amount of injury done by parents in 
their m^^ot of ikU matter, is iocajculable. We have in our own 
fchoolff and doubt not that the same is the case with all the otheiVt 
BumeroiM iiistaftoes, in which pupils have been sent to us too late for 
tliDrou^ education, notwithstanding our almost incessant labons 
with their frieodfy from its cocnmcHfDBeinent, at which time they were 
far better fitted to profit by our instruction. There ara, moreover, 
many others, in different parts of the State, with whom we are still 
earnestly pleading, but in vain, to accept the blessings vouchsafed to 
them by an All-mercifol Providence, through the humble instrumen- 
tality of the Institute. 



HOUSEHOLD DBPARTMENT. 

In the management of the domestic e^oonomy of the establishment, 
the usual attention has been given to the promotion of the comfort 
of the pupils. As the number of our family has been somewhat 
greater during the past year, than that of the previous one, there has 
of course been some increase in the disbvirsements of this department; 
bat if we take into account the uausualiy high price of provisions of 
all kinds, together with the fact that the present report embraces one 
month more than the last, it must be admitted (hat there has been a 
rektive diminution of expense. 



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The thanks of the Institute are doe to the proprieton of the sem- 
a newspapers and periodicals named below, for their kindoess is 
sending us, without charge, copies of their respeetiTe pubKcatioiis. 
Most of them have been received during the entire year, whib tke 
rest have been regularly forwarded for a greater or lew part of tke 
time. 

Ihdiaha Statb JommAiii 
Indiana Statb JSmTiavH 
Indiana Statesman, 
Fahilt VurrBK, 

LOOOHOTIYB, 

CouenAN Rboosd, 
St. Joseph Valley Rbqutbk, 
Montoombrt Jovknal, 
New Albany Ledobe, 

RiOHBtOND PALLADnm, 
VlNOBNNBS GaIBTTB, 

Dekogratig Phaeos, 
Madison Weekly Coukibe, 
Indiana Rboisteb, 
Wayne Ooitnty Whig, 
Democatio Claeion, 
Dboatue Clarion, 
Andbebon Gaxbtte, 
Washington Dkmoceat, 
Indiana Tbibune, 

WEnVEN CoEIflTIAN AdTOCATE, (CiB.) 

Non-Slayeholdee, (Phiiad'a.) 



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In conclusion, allow me gentlemen, to ask yonr serious attention 
to the foregoing remarks upon the proper training of the Blind, for 
the datioB and relations of practical lire. This matter has heretofore 
received too little attention. The aim has apparently been to make 
prodigies, rather than sturdy, practical men. The time has now ar- 
rived, bowover, for a change; and unless it shall be made, our sys- 
tem must fail to realize the lofty hopes of its benevolent founders. 
Look abroad in the world, and we will find that nearly all the pov- 
erty and pauperism in it, are attributable to this lack of eneigeiic 
training, this want of development of those powers from which it 
derived the true dignity of man. How then can we expect for the 
Blind, exemption from the penalty consequent upon the infringement 
of thb plain, but important law of our being T 
Yeiy Respectfully, 

W. a CHURCHMAN. 
Ikbsaiiafqus, Nov. 1, 1850. 



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OQMPOSITION BY MARGARST BRI.r.Hg8t 



TO ni TBB ■0—OOiW MMttt- 



Tkmj rfMp itt Jasiis, etbnly, mretdy ]M«r» 
No pang af tfwrow tlffilk tbe yootUU fanwl s 
Hie cold, dunp earth ■ oa the ranny hmw. 
And they have feoiid, at h^t, a place of iwt 
Their 8avioar led them throDffa death's poitaia dte. 
They tmited all in Him. 

Few kindied'a mileo fllomed their daAaome way ; 

Lone pilgrima all la life's diear wildernem. 

Their father amiled in realme of eadlem day, 

And beekoaed them to hemea of fadelem biim 

Homaa, where the hearts' foad breathiafi kaow ao blj^, 

la ereilaitiBf light 

We BUM them, whea at hoar of pnyer we moel : 
We hear aot bow, whea hymae of praiae arim, 
Tlieir tnaefal toaea ; aad oa eaeh vacaat aeat 
We maae with qaiioriaf lip aad teaifnl eyaa 
Bat wherefore weep, to meet them here ao men t 
Hiey are bat goae before. 

We thaak thee. Lord, that ia eaeh atriekea heart. 
The radnat star of hope doth brightly ahiae ; 
Aad while we weep that thaa we oariy part. 
We bleoi the chait'Biag head, for it la Thine ; 
We kaow Thy Meroy, Lord— Thy righteooa waya ; 
Aad while we moara, we i 



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4S« 



COMPOSITION BY ALICE HOLMES. 



f TOBK iiffrmrnoN roR tiuc bund. 
msTrFonoN. 



AdRm, adieu, my lon^ lor^ tiomttt 

Wbera gpaul spirita dwell, 
For I mast bid thy hearth and halb. 

This dayj a sad farewell. 
Thy vesper bell will peal at eve. 

Bat not, alas ! for me ; 
For I shall be alone and sad. 

Far, far away from thee ! 

Adiea, adiea, my guides beloved ; 

] 
Yi toil. 

Fa 11. 

J 
Ba 



Adiea, adiea, ooropanioiis tfetf ; 

My siste 
Hiisday C( 

This da] 
Batoh! bi 

To hear 
Thatbidsi 

Frqpith 

Adiea, adieo ! It'mast be so ? 

Thei 
TbatU 

My I 
When 

Te^ 
Oh,bif 

WIM 



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fbw foraMd ft plNi. tiMl t'Mi the au 
Mfty iMurm Iht watel ftitk 

SipmiioM fit jonr iini» to i|Mftk, 
I knew Bot wImto to flad s 

May God nwud yosr effMti i 
Tvftdaflttatebliail 



AdiftSiftdiea ! too happy hoan 

That learning did employ. 
And gave for eiory momonfs tell. 

A eweet lewaid of joy : 
Forthoywillbe uoloBcerMiM. 

My echool-day joya are o'er . 
Far dearar riioftld I priie them now. 

Could they retmni onoemore. 

Adieu, adieu to morning walks 

Along the HadMm'a aide, 
Wheio oft amid the rocka we heard 

Hio murie of the tide : 
Aad waadoringa al twilight hoar, 

Through giore, by hiO and atream. 
Thai I hftfo oTor fondly prised. 

Bui dealer now thoy aecm. 



Adieu, adieu to moac'a charm. 

From it,too, Imnat part; 
Much ihatt I miaa ita magic power. 

To cheer my lonely heart 
Adieu, ye bbrda, at eariy dawn 

Hwt near my caeemeni aung. 
While aP aiuund the waUng floweia 

Their aoft. aweet odom flu^g. 

Adieu, adieu, ye treea and flowera. 

And pleaaant play-groanda, all ; 
A Toioe for me la calling now, 

From yonder front-door hall. 
Theatot^y domidl demanda 

ApartingfaraweU,too; 
But oh! »tiaaad,toaUwe*Tolore4. 

At onee to bid adieus 

Adiau, adttau, my doiater homo. 

With all thy hallowed tlea ; 
The precepts thou hast giToa me. 

Meat deariy I shall prise. 
Tkiala. perchance, await ma a«w» 

IkaowBoiyetmyloi; . 



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47 

Bat be it ireit], or U Him, 
Thou ihalt not be foi^pet 

Adiev» onoe more, jt Icfred onet all ? 

Foiyire theae goehiiif tewi. 
And all the wrooge I yev have doae* 

Throagfa eeran by-gima jean^ 
BtDl in yoar faaarla, oh, let na Uva» 

TOlyeaMaaUadtadle^- . 
Oh»Boir tiiay leadma lo the gala ! 

Larad lioina-*good*by— goad-by ! 



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ADMISSION OF PUPILS. 



Any person wishing to make application for the admission of a 
upil into the Institute, should address either the Secretary of ibe 
'oard of Trustees, or the Superintendent of the Institute, giving 
definite and accurate information upon the following points, viz: 

1. The name of the applicant and that of his parent or guardiaoi 
toffether with the Post OfKce address of the latter. 

2. The date of the birth of the applicant. 

3. The cause of hb Blindness, and the age at which it occurred. 

4. Whether he is of sound mind and susceptible of intellectual 
culture. 

5. Whether he is free from bodily deformity and infectious disease. 

6. Whether his personal habits and moral character are good. 
Upon the receipt of such application, it will be acted upon by the 

Trustees, and the applicant informed of the result. 

No pupil should be sent to the Institute until the above preliminary 
step shall have been taken. 

To residents of the State no charge is made for the boarding and 
instruction of their children ; but pupils are in all cases expected to 
come provided with a change of good comfortable clothing, which 
must be replenished by their friends from time to time, as it becomes 
necessary. Where parents or guardians are unable through indi- 
gence to provide the necessary clothing, the commissioners of the 
counties in which they reside are authorized by law to iprnish the 
same in their stead. 

All traveling expenses of the pupils to and from the Institute must 
be borne by their friends. 

All books, musical instruments and other apparatus required for 
the use of the pupils during their term of instruction, are furnished 
by the Institute free of charge. 

The school commences its sessions on the first Monday in Octo- 
ber, and closes on the last Wednesday in July, leaving a vacation of 
more than two months during the warm season, which is spent by 
the pupils at their homes. 



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53 

It is important that new pupils should enter upon their term of 
instruction at the commencement of a session* and it is expected of 
all the others that they shall be present at the opening of the school, 
and renaain until it closes on the last day of the session. 

As a general rule applicants are not admitted who are over twen- 
ty-one years of age, but exceptions are sometimes made in favor of 
persons who are of undoubted ability, and free from all objectionable 
habits. 



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Doc. No. 2.] [Part. II. 

REPORT 



OF TRB 



AGENT OF STATE 



TO TRB 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



DECEMBER, 1850, 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

J. p. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 

1850. 
2D6 



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ABSTRACT OF REPORT 

ov 

JAMES COLLINS, JS., 

AGENT OF STATE, 

WtLOM 

SEPTEMBER 30, 1849, TO FEBRUARY 1, 1850, 

OOMPILED rEOM 1SS 

EECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR OF STATE. 



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REPORT. 



Officb ov Auditor op Statb* ) 
Indianapolis, Dec. 21, 1850. ) 

To the Omorabkj the htgislalurt of Indiana: 

The Report of Jas. Collins Jr., Esq., late Agent of State, submitted 
to the L^islature at its session ot 1849-50, presented the operations 
of his office in part to the 1st July, 1849, and in part to Sept. 30, 
1849. His term of office expired after the adjournment of the 
Legislature, and consequently no subsequent Report was laid before 
that body. 

A full report was made to this office by Mr. Collins, on his final 
settlement in February, and it is thought proper, in order that the 
Legislature may be kept fully advis^ of the operations of the 
Agency, to publish an abstract thereof, embracing the period inter* 
vening between the date of his last report to the Legislature, and 
the close of his term. 

This abstract, following the order of date, is prefixed to the report 
of the present incumbent, and shows the following particulars: 



Bofids Surrendered. 

The total number of bonds outstanding at the period 

of the arrangement of the Public Debt was, 11,048 

The number surrendered to July 1st, 1849, was, 9,530 ^ 

Urnng then outstanding, 1,518 



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60 

There were surrendered from July 1st, 1849, to close of ColUns's 
term as follows : 

Internal Improvement Bonds, 92 

Wabash and Erie Canal Bonds, 2 

Madison and Indianapolis R. R. Bonds, 6 

Bank Bonds, 7 

Total, lOT 

Leaving outstanding Feb. 1st, 1850, 1,411 

Interest Account. 

The amount of interest paid by Mr. Collins, during the period 
named, was as follows: 

On account of January Interest, 1848, 60 00 

On account of July In'lerest, 1848, 70 00 

On account of January Interest, 1849, 160 00 

On account of July Interest, 1849, 796 00 

Oa account of January Interest, 1850, 89,424 00 

Total, $90,510 CO 



The Interest due and unpaid at the close of his term, was as fol- 
lows: 

On July dividend, 1847, 70 00 

On January dividend, 1848, 140 00 

On Jul V dividend, 1848, 160 ( 

On January dividend, 1849, 2SU 00 

On July dividend, 1849, 1,030 00 

On January dividend, 1850, 6,396 00 

Total, $8,076 00 



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61 



Office Expenditures. 

Incidental Expenses &c. of Agent, 2,248 74 

Salary of Agent, 83 33 

Interest on Drafts and Premiums, 2,597 16 

Specific Appropriations, 917 50 

Interest on draft, 44 39 

Total, $5,891 12 



Paid to Successor, May, $8,000 00 

The Report also exhibits a statement of the several descriptions of 
stock issued from the date of his last report. 

A settlement was made ivith Mr. Collins at the close of his term, 
and the amount found due the State in his hands was paid over to his 
successor. All of which is respectfully submitted, 

E. W. H. ELLIS, 
Auditor of Staie. 



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Jan. 30. 1880. 

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Jan. 30. 1850. 

Jan. 30. 1890. 

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72 



Register of Two and a-hqJf Per Cent. StaU Stock. 



Dvt; 



Jf0. 



In wkoat Ftor, 



Ami, •/ 

original 

etrttfUf 



tUmmka, 



Jnly 17 1849 

July 81 •♦ 

Aug? " 

Aug 9 " 

Aug 15 " 

Aug 17 •* 

Aug 83 ** 

Aug 88 '' 

Aug 85 " 

Bept 4 " 

Sept 14 " 

8«pt 80 •* 

Sept " '• 

Sept " »• 

Sept 89 " 

Oct 1 •• 

Sept 80 " 

Oct " 

Oct 87 " 

Oct " " 

Oct " " 

Nov 8 " 

Nov 5 " 

Nov 9 '• 

Nov 9 •• 

Nov IS ♦* 

Nov 13 •• 

Nov 80 " 

Nov 17 " 

Nov 19 •• 

Nov 86 " 

Nov " " 

Nov " " 

Nov 88 " 

Nov 38 " 

Nov 86 " 

Dec 6 ** 
Dec 6 

Dec 6 ** 
Dec 6 

Dec 7 " 

Dec 18 ** 

Dec *» " 

Dec 14 ** 

Dec •• " 

Dec " " 

Dec 15 •• 

Dec " " 

Dec " " 

Dec " " 

Dec " " 

Dec 81 " 



Dec 87 
Dec 88 
Dec 89 
Jen 7 
Jen 3 
Jan 8 
Jen 8 
Jan 10 
Jenl 
Jen 11 
Jen <* 
Jen " 
Jan " 
Jan •' 



1850 



1486 
1487 
1488 
1489 
1490 
1491 
1498 
1493 
1494 
1495 
1496 
1497 
1498 
1499 
1500 
1501 
1508 
1503 
1504 
1505 
1506 
1507 
1508 
1509 
1510 
1511 
1518 
1513 
1514 
1515 

1516 
1517 
1518 
1519 
1580 
1581 
15SS 
1583 
1534 
1SS5 
1586 
1587 

lan 

15S9 
1530 
1531 
1538 
1533 
1534 
1535 
1536 
1537 



1538 
1539 
1540 
1541 
1548 
1543 
1544 
1545 
1546 
1547 
1548 
1549 
1550 
1551 



John J Crocheron 

Sylveeter Halle 

winelow, Lanier and Co 

William H NeiliOtt 

Winslow, Lanier and Co 

Wetmore k. Cruder 

Winalow, Lanier and Co 

William BAetor 

Winelow, Lanier and Co 

CbarleaV Chamberlain , 

J obn Vanderhoir ^London) .... 

Pierpont Phillipe 

Gilbert, Cobb and Johneon.. . ., 

George Hadden of London 

leaac L Nicbolaon of Baltimore 

Herman J Tttze 

Gilbert. Cobb and Johnson. .... 

John Warren and Son 

M W Collett 

Narki Wilke Collett 

.Aymar and Co 

iCharlotte Smith 

AG Allen 

John Warren and Son 

James Coggershall 

William and John O'Brien 

John Warren and Son 

Hoyt and Hunt 

£dmund Tweedy 

D W Deshler,Cas. Clinton Bank, 

Columbus, Ohio 

John Rose 

Jubal Terbell 

John Warren and Son 

Jubal Terbell 

James H Van Alien 

John Warren and Son 

iWinslow, Lanier and Co 

I John Warren and Son 

iJubal Terbell 

Edmund Tweedy 

Mrs Henrietta Samuel of Eng. 

George Peabody 

■James Battell 

Isaac L Nicholson of Baltimore 

INehemiah Tunis 

HT Morgan 

'Adams and Sturges 

Solomon Sturges 

Daniel B Ryall 

■John Warren and Son 

Winslow, Lanier and Co 

Walter J Spring Casbome, of 

New House, Packenham,. 



Jubal Terbell .' 

j Winslow, Lanier and Co 

'Edmund Tweedy 

John Warren and Son 

Jubal Terbell ] 

John Osgood | 

Winslow, Lanier and Co , 

Sandford Coley 

Tutullen D Stewart | 

John Warren and Son 

J LWheeler 

L Wheeler 

Jos Wheeler 

L P Wilson, Esq., of 11 Rings 
Arms Yard, Lond. and R An- 
derson of \ Castle-on-Tyne 



80,000 

490 
8,345 

460 
1,835 
4,600 

460 
17,143 
1,900 

830 

930 
8,000 
3,000 

980 
8,000 

830 
1,000 
1,000 
1,550 
8,518 
8,518 

347 



63 



Tr997tolSBSaBd*4 
Tr 870 to 1408 
Tr89StOl«S,<aia]id'» 

Tr381t4>IS76a]id*5 

TrSOOtolsaSaBd"!} 



Tr 874 to 1500 awl's 



TrSTStoiya 
Tr 888 to 1519 



387 
1,080 
8,518 

900 

1,080 

4,080 

460 

3,000 

168 

3,000 

300 

915 

1,880 

90 

8,000 

3.930 

1,087 

8,335 

1,150 

2,000 

330 

1,000 

40,000 

sn 

3,000 
3,000 
5,300 



Tr9BStol51S 

Tr3e8tol5C9 
TraBBto]5i7a]id*10 

Tr 884 to 1514 
TraBBtol5i7aBd*18 
Tr 303 to 1985 



Tr 383 to 1573 

Tr3C9tol543 
Tr 898 to 1983 and *4 
Tr38l toI576aBd*5 
Tr907tol541Uid'8 



50 



Tr 310 to ISO 



50 



Tr 305 to 1538 

Tr 316 to 1557 aad V 



8,000 

817 50 

837 50 
40 
1,000 
9,900 
1,000 
1,175 

500 

600 

670 

670 

670 



670 



Tr 381 to 676 and 1575 
Tr 383 to 1575 

Tr 381 to 1570 and *5 

Tr 383 to 1575 

Blotted and not isncd. 



Digitized by 



Google 



69 



Register of Five Per Cent. State Stock. 




In wk0»» Favor. 



j Jtmt. of 

original 

^eerttJUato 



Romarko. 



18S 
163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
171 
1T8 
173 

m 

175 
178 

m 

178 
179 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
193 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
196 
100 
900 
801 
iX» 
903 
S04 
905 
906 
S07 
908 
909 
910 
911 
919 
913 
914 
915 
916 
917 
918 
919 
990 
991 



S24 
995 
996 
997 
988 
999 
930 
931 



HeiTOftn T. Titze 

£. W. CUrk, DodM & Co.,. . 

Wlnilow. Lanier a Co., 

Georce w. Horton, 

Ralph Manb 

Carpen dc Vermilye, 

Robert H. Archer, 

William H. Windaon 

John Oagood, 

AdaiQi & Stungea, 

AdaiuadE Sturgea, 

Adama de Sturgea, 

Adama dc Sturgea, 

Adama dc Sturgea, 

A. Hamilton Smith 

Jamea G. King dc Sona, 

Brown, Brothera dc Co., 

Ralph Marah, 

D. P. Barhjrdt, 

Edward B Powera 

Calvin P Fuller, 

Drkera, Alatyne dc Co 

Gilbert, Cobb Ac Johnaon. ... 
BW Clark, Podge dc Co.... 

Winalow, Lanier A Co 

Winalow, Lanier dc Co 

RHNeviuaAcCo 

Eateran Domenecb 

LdcBDeCappet 

JLIttledtCo 

MW Collet.* 

Marka Wilka Collet 

Aymardc Co 

Eateran Domenech 

Robert Crittenden 

Eater&n Domenech 

JaaGrigg Wllaon 

Edward E Powera 

Eateran Domenech 

Eateran Domenech 

Jacob Little dc Co 

Eateran Domenech 

E W Clark, Dodge A Co 

William A Sandford 

Jocob Little dcCo ,..». 

A G Allen 

Eateran Domenech..... 

Eateran Domenech 

Emanuel C Reigart 

Emanuel C Reigart 

Jacob Little dc Co 

Winalow, Lanier & Co 

Conning dc Co 

recella Cook of Ind 

Ward A Co 

CormingdbCo < 

Week^dt Co 

Jamea Coggeraball 

jHenryHart 

I Wm and John O'Brien 

iWard&Co 

Samuel Brown 

i Jacob Little dc Co 

{Camman and Whitehouee.. 

jComingand Co 

Rev Daniel H Short 

Jacob Little and Co 

Gilbert, Cobb and Johnaon. 
£ W Clark , Dodge and Co. . 

CharleaBiid 

Geoife B Coe, Caah*r > 



500 

4,000 

10,800 

4.000 

5,000 

5,000 

9,000 

1,000 

4,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

1,500 

1,000 

10.000 

5,000 

3,000 

10,000 

4,500 

300 

5,000 

9,noo 

5,000 

450 
1,000 
9,000 
1,750 
7,000 
5,000 
7,500 
7,500 
1,000 
6,000 
1,950 
1,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
9,000 
5,000 
4,000 
1,000 
5,000 
1,000 

750 
90.000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
9,500 
5,000 
1,000 
3,000 
4^000 
1,000 
1,000 

500 
3,000 
4,000 

500 
5,000 
9,900 
9.000 
1,000 
5,000 
10,000 
6,000 
9JI0O 

io;hw 



Tr. 800 to 165. 

Tr. 816 to 180, % •g, and ^ 



Tr. 815 to im 
Tr.911to315. 



Tr 827 to 190 
Tr835U>S00 
Tr 896 to 191 
Tr 805 to 988 
Tr 864 to 190 

Tr 848 to 909 

Tr 831 to 105 and ^ 

Tr 836 to 801 and «9 



Tre50to9S4and*5 
Tr 849 to 900 
Tr9Wto311 
Tr 849 to 909 
Tr 878 to 953 

T^ 849 to 909 
Tr 849 to 909 
Tr 837 to 903 
Tr 849 to 900 
Tr903toS96And«7 

Tr 866 to 945 
Tr 844 to 916 
Tr 849 to 909 



Tr 885 to 981 
Tr847to999;*93a 
Tr 845 to 918 



Tr 890 to 977 
Tr 856 to 930 

Tr 858 to 997 



Tr 879 to 951 
Tr 800 to 977 

Tr 855 to 999 
Tr 854 to 931 
Tr 856 to 230 



Tr8S5ro9» 

Tr 859 to 933, '4 and*8 

Tr 903 to 996 and 7 

)Tr865toMtaaA<3 



Digitized by 



Google 



74 



Register of Special Deferred Canai Stock. 




J«l7 It, 18« 
•apt4 » 
Sept 14 «* 
SeptSO " 
Octl " 
Nov 5 " 

Novae *• 

Doo7 - 

Dec 19 *• 

DecM *" 

Bee 81 " 



987 

9B8 



Bee9t ' 

J«BlS IflOtt 

Jan " • 

Jan " • 

Jan - ' 

Jan 18 ' 

Jan '• • 

Jan " * 

Jan " • 

Jan •• • 

PebS ' 



89J 



888 

988 
984 
98S 
888 

887 



381 



M^or Bdwaitf Darrall 

Charlee V Chamberlain «. . • 

John Vandeiliof (London) 

Geoiie Radden of London 

HermanJ PItse 

AGAUen 

John Bote • 

Bin Henrietta Samael of Kn«. . . . 

ranee Battell 

Nehenlab ^^nte « 

Walter J Sprinc Caebomeof New 

Hottie, Pacnenham, Berry at. 

Eda..Clerk 

Winslow, Lanier and Co 

WW Corcoran 

WW Corcoran 

William H HaitMck 

JohnH Barheclt 

WllUamHRichaida 

Charlee Morrieon 

Charlee Moniaon 

Charlee Morrison 

Jamee Nonfeon 

Wlnelow, Lanier and Co 



188 
188 



887 881 



ms8 



7S 
••M8 

488 
198 I 



PorWaBefllandEiitCui} 



no fallowing flrom Book Ubeled ** TVanaftre.*' 



Aof 8, 1848.1 888 

Aaffl7 ** 888 

Jan98l8B8. 580 

Jan88 '* 581 

Jan38 » I 588 



WnUamH Neilron.... 
Wetmore and Crrdsr., 

Oeoiie Feabody 

James Morrison 

Moeee AUen 



5,387 58 187 
758 
158 ' 



i- 



Por W, an* B. C. ««•* 



Digitized by 



Google 



75 



Kegi$ier of Preferred Canal Siock. 




July 3, 18m 

July 7 •* 

Julys •• 

July II •• 

Joly It *• 

July " •• 

AufO •' 

IteptSO ** 

Octe •• 

Oet» • 

Ocl«7 •• 

Oct»7 " 

»ov J7 •• 

Hov 1» <* 

Dec 19 " 



JaBt8,18B0L 



841 
8« 
843 
844 
845 
84ft 
•47 
848 
848 



851 
898 
8S8 

851 



to 



Tertallft* D Stewaxi. ..... 

Wintlow, Lanier and Co. 

Sandfoid Cotoy 

OARoUiaa 

OARolUnt 

Alaz P flarrlran 

William B Actor 

GeoBSiitonTr 

C WPotttm 

APHandaon 

Xarka WUks Collet 

Marke WUka Collet 

lacobA Bobertaon 

D W SealiIer«Cai. Olatoo Baalt, 

Columbofl, Ohio. 
Oeoife Bnibody 



Oooi)|o Pttabodjr 

888 incloalTe, blotted and not ii-{raed. 

Coming and Co...... 

Solomon Btnfgea. .*.< 

APllarrieon 



3,580 

14,000 
88.175 

«,noo 

5,000 
3,500 



IJOO 
14,000 Tri04to801 



rr IB to 841 and •S 
Tr 88 to 840 
Tr84tol088aad*7 



19,500 

11,500 
5,000 
9,500 



15iNI0 

19 



Digitized by 



Google 



RegUter qf Special Preferred Canal Stock. 



Data. 



JW. 



/» wkoSM IkOM*. 



Jlmt. 0/ 

orifinal 

eertt JU^e 



Juk'y SO, 1850. 



8S5 'Georigfl Peabody, London . 



VM 



Register of Dtferred Stocky issued for W. and E. C. Bonds. 



Data. 


AV». 


In wkoMt Fmor, 


Jimt. •/ 

original 

o«rt(jUaU. 


Remmrka. 


AugtSS, 164B. 
DecH " 


45 


William fi Aator 


85^000 

500 

S,000 

8,000 

9.000 

500 




40 
47 
48 
49 
SO 
SI 


Ndhamiah Tunla. ..••.........•. 




Jan 11, 18i0. 


J L Wheeler 




Jan **' " 


liWheeler 




Jtn •* •* 


Joe Wheeler 




Jan IS - 


WW Cori/Oran 




Jon 9» « 


Geone Peabody r... 


soo 



Register of Preferred Stock, issued for W. and E. C. Bonds. 



Date, 


JV^. 


In wk0$9 Clever. 


JhU.0f 

TifinMl 

e«rti/U«ee. 


RmmtkM. 


<Oct 6 1849 


79 
80 
8» 
88 

83 


CWPoturie 


1,000 
9,000 
19,500 

500 

1,000 




Oct 97 " 


Marka Wilka Coliet 




Not 17 " 
Not 19 " 


Jacob A Robertson 

D W Deahler, Cos. Clinton Bank 
oi Columbut, Ohio .......... 




(Dm 8 " 


Rlchaid Hale. Man*f Ezr 





Digitized by 



Google 



77 



Register of De/en-ed Canal Stock. 



D9f. 


JWr. 


j Amu 6f 

/« wk«tt Fav0r, i original 

'eert^at*. 


Uemark*. 

• ■ 


Jal7 10, 1 


848. 

M 
•* 
U 

M 
M 
M 
M 

•< 
•4 
•« 

«4 
<• 
U 

M 
M 

«. 

M 
U 

M 
44 
M 
M 
«4 
«• 

4« 

«• 
M 
M 
«i 

(t 
«4 
(t 
t< 
«t 
«• 

M 

1850. 

(4 
•4 
M 
M 
M 

M 
M 
M 
«« 
«« 
M 
«4 

U 
4« 


380 
961 
368 
363 
364 
365 
360 
367 
368 
309 
370 
37i 
979 
373 
374 
375 
371 
377 
378 
379 
3811 
981 
389 
383 
364 
385 
386 
387 
388 
389 
380 
391 
389 
303 
394 
399 
396 
397 
396 
399 
40U 

401 

US 

404 

405 
406 

4U7 

406 

409 

410 
411 
419 
413 
4)4 
415 
416 
.417 


Mftior Edward D&rrall 


9,000 
500 

500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
5'iO 
5011 
500 
500 
500 
5r6 
500 
500 
500 
500 




inly 16 


Itham Hendcnon 




J«l7 » 


Itham HcDd^rvon ............... 




July " 






Jalj " 


Isham Hcnderaon 


' 


July " 


lahank Hendereon. ...... ........ 




J«\y '• 


laham Hendorson 




Jaly " 


Ishan Henderson » • 




Joly " 


Isham HoDd^Tvon . ............ 




Joly " 


labaxn Henderton 




July *• 


Iftham Honderaon 




July " 


Isham Hendenon 




July " 


laham Henderson 


Cfe. No. 387 issued in lieu. 


July - 


Isham Henderson 


July " 


Isham Henderson 


July " 


Isham Henderson 




July •• 


Isham Henderson 




July " 


Isham Henderson 


5(10 

500 

500 

50« 

50O 

500 

1,0.10 

l,tI0O 

10,000 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

506 

8,000 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

9;M» 

9.500 

! 

\ l^ 

500 
500 
500 

500 
500 

aoo 
} 

> 8.006 
9,000 
SOOO 
1,000 

8;soo 

10,500 

soo 
soo 
soo 


^ 


July •* 


Isham Henderson 




July " 






July « 


Isham Hdnderson 




July " 


Isham Henderson 




July " 


Tsham Henderson .............. 




July 81 


SyWester Hale 




■Aug 9 


William H Keilson 


Tr 29 to 388 and •9 


Aug 17 


Wetmore and Cryder . ........... 


A^ SS 






Aug " 


Isham Hendenon 




a4 » 


Isham Henderson 




Att| ^ 






S^t 4 
Sept 14 

oa 1 


Charles V Chamberlain 

John Vandenhoff, London 

George Hadden, London 

Herman 1 Fitxe*.... 




KoT 5 


AG Allen ,, 


TrSOto 395 


Nov 7 


Douglass Putnam........ • 




Not 9 


James Coggershall. ............. 




Not 99 


John Rose 




]>ect9 


Mis HenriotU Samnel, Sng 

Joseph Battell 




Dm 91 

Itee98 
Ju 19 


Walter J Spring 'Jasbome, of 
New House, I^ckenham, Ber- 
ry st Bd.. Clerk 

Isham Henderson 


Tr 33 to 406 


Jan « 


Isham HendersoB«.« 




Ju « 


Tsham Hendenou. .....»•.•..... 




J&B " 


Isham Henderson 




Ju - 
Ju 11 


Isham Henderson 

Lestock Peach Wilson, London, 
and Robert Anderson, New 
Castle-on -Tyne, 




Jti 19 


William H HaAeck 




Jtn « 


JohnH Haibeck 




•ItB 18 


WilUamH Richai^ 




J&u - 


Charles MmTiaon 




Jtu 99 






Jan 30 


James Morrison 




Jtn *• 


Moses Allen 


Tr 35 to 416 


Pf.b 9 
a?eb « 


Winslow, Lanier and Co 


Tr 36 to 417 


«Peb « 


Isham Hsnderson 





Digitized by 



Google 



78 



/n/ww/ due to the holders of tie Five Per Cent. Stale Stocky (^ ik 
State of Indiana, on the 1st of January, 1850. 



Jimnnt •f Stock. 



StstkkoUort' J\ram§a. 



^HMrnt V imtmsL 



$1,S00 
17S,00> 

43^ 
1,500 

15,500 

96.750 
5,000 
3,500 
1,500 

s,aoo 

1,000 
\M0 
9,OD0 
51,175 
8,000 

J-SS 

7,000 

io;wi 

500 

5,500 

500 

ttjOOO 

90,500 

3,500 



9,500 
37,500 
]95;»0 
91,000 

5,000 
40,000 

3,000 

ijon 

9,500 



IJStib 
9,000 
1,500 
3,500 
10,000 



1,500 
5,000 
500 
44,500 
9,000 
9,950 
94,900 
500 



1,000 
9,400 
4,500 

500 
18,500 
9,000 

500 
3,000 
5,000 
3,000 

500 
4,500 

500 
10,000 
1,000 
9,500 
9,500 



Ackernun J C • 
Adams and Stunet • 
Adma OffiM of Hope aud Co 
Ante John • 
Aitkin James 
Aldrick Herman D • 
Anderson D J 
Albany BaTings Bank 
Allen Q«orge If • 
Allen Lyman - 
Ambler Daniel C - 
Anderson John Walker 
Archer Robert A - 
Astor William B • 
Anldjo John 
Anldjo Thomas Rose 
AHriU Jr Frederick 

Bach Adolphoa • 

Bagnall O 

Bagnall Bzr. Gooife and James 

Bagnall James 

BaiUie Akzander 

Baillie Astiun 

Baker J L - 

Baldwin John O 

Banks David 

Bank of Albion 

Bank of Savings City N Y 

Baring, Brothers and Co 

Barclay Hugh 

Barton BliphasB 

Bard and Son William • 

Baihydt David P 

Bates Samuel B • 

Battell Joseph 

Beals Bush and Co 

Bevan Robert C L 

Bennett Mary, La P 

Benton William P • 

Beers JonephD - 

fiaorard Tr Robert 

Beecher Sarah S • 

Beers William 

Beets Mrs MaigaretU > 

Bnnyon Mrs O L 

Beadiren 6 

Belmont Aunwt 

Beadwell John • 

BittWUlUm- 

Bird Charles • ^ - 

BiephamRamnel 

Black and Co Thomas • 

Blair William Ths of Bath 

Booth Tmsiee WilUam O 

Bonncke and Co 

Broad W • 

Bieeee William O • 

Browning John H 

BroadheadJohttR * 

Bridgham Edward 

Bros* T ' • 

Bradley John N • 

Brown Samuel 

BpBwster Seabury 

!Brown James 

!Brown,Brother»andCo- 

Buckingham Sturgos and Convers, Kxrn 
'Buckingham Philo 
iBuckingham William 



31B 
539 

IM 

as 

Si 

90 

90 

« 

1,00 » 



10 

uo 

10 

410 
7% 

100 
10 
50 

at 

9410 



90 
50 



30 
70 

9P0 
# 
10 
90 

WO 
JO 



10 
50 

90 

4i 

9D 
10 

370 
40 
10 
00 

100 
00 
10 
90 
10 

900 
90 
50 
53 



Digitized by 



Google 



79 

InUretl due to the AoUers of the Five Per Cent. State Stock, of the 
State ef Indianaton the Ist of January^ 185(1 — Continued. 



^immtmi tf mmk. 



St0Uk9UT»* A^M««. 



^memM tf lUtr$€U 



5JI 



1400 
l,iOO 



Si^BOO 



SMoo 



»« 



1,0( 



96*000 

13,000 

1,000 

I,fOO 

8JD00 



lO^NlO 



15*000 
1,000 



9pn 



«,aoo 

500 
1,500 
7.500 

SDO 
3^0 

s,ooo 

13,500 



9,580 

IJBOD 
1400 



3,50a 

8,000 
6,000 
14100 

510 



{Backingham Bbenei^ r 
iBiickinfb«m John - 
BayiDt Bordm tad Jordan 
|i:aibonie Walter J Spring 
•CaflMll aad Galifber 
iCarpenter Geneiml 0«orge 
iChapman and Co - 
iCbappleamith John • 
Charter Mn B . 
Cbitwood George B > 
Chambtrlaln C V 
Chase M Off an C 
Cheiapeake Bank, BaJttBon 
Clarke Jeremiah 
(^lark B 1¥ Dodge and Co 
ClappPUlto • 
Commercial Bank, Albany 
CoUlngt Sir William 
Cowles John B - 
Collett Harka Wilka 
Con ▼ess Charles U 
Coggeishall James • 
Coe,Gas, George 8 
Cotterell Thomas • 
Cook James (Ind)- 
Cook Cecelia • 

Crawffofd Thomas C 
Crittenden B - 
Crocker Uriel 
Crooee John • 
Craske Charles • 
Culver WilUam B - 
CntisWilber . 
iC«nie William and James 
Cnie Canri 
.CndUpF Joseph 

Dallam Francis J 

.Danwall MiJorBdward 

Davis Adms. f-barles 

Daniel Cola Francis A 

Davis Isaac 

Davis Thomas B 

De Graff John J - 

Bo Stairbarg Bacon Angs 

De Maeedo J 

DeSeignenxBJrcP 

Deming Demns • 

Denman Mn Maria • 

Dent Kim B 

Dentniomas 

Dickey James 

Dixon C - I 

Dixon Thomas ' 

BiUon John - 

DilUrrn Barak • 

Dick qnintin 

Donnelly Ji 

Dorr ^hn 

Domeneeb Bstena 

Docker II 

Debree Bamne^ - 

Dotglass Manns B • 

Drake Joseph 

Omnn Goorge H 

DiasbmghOT 

Dunham Tr.Mn MB 

Darkee Harrison • 

Dykes L F B an« Marsballs 

Eaiion Charlei 



10 

ao 



100 



30 

10 



19 
10 



» 

w 

3» 
15» 



S7U 



71^ 

4a 



Digitized by 



Google 



80 

Interest due to the holdert rf the Five Per Cent. State Stock cf tk 
State of Indiana^ on the Yst of January^ 1850. — CoTdimui, 




$5,000 
8.000 
5.000 
7,000 

10,000 
6,000 
S,000 

13,000 
1,000 

1,500 
4.000 
4,300 
S3,500 
34,500 
6,500 
9,000 



1,00(1 
3/MlO 
10,000 
5,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,500 
900 
1,000 
4,500 

3,000 

3,000 

500 

SOD 

7,500 
3,500 
3,500 
S,000 
1,000 
5,000 



7,01 

4,000 

1.000 

4,000 

1,000 

1,500 

7,400 

4,000 

9A)00 
4,000 
1,900 
1,000 



4,000 
2,500 
500 
3,000 
5,000 
9^500 
7,000 

10,000 

10,000 
9,000 
5,000 

70,000 
9,100 

19,500 
3,000 



KUis John 
Elting Luther 
BnuettAgnet • 
£in»on Chriitian D 
Etcher Henry • 
Evtni John 
Event Cept JT 
Eyre Cept. Thomei 
Byken R 



Perrington E - 
Penning Patrick • 
PallRichertl .... 
Peigueon John Irving X B 

Pergueon John W Y 

Pergoeon Abbott and Pergueon, Trueteee, 
Pergueon Miea A P 
PerriePloyd T - - • 

PiahBlitabeth 

PlayJemee .... 
Pleminc of Phlla David • 
Powle Edward, London 
Porbea Murray 
Poeter John N > 
iPry Joseph L 

Pruhllng and Groacher ^ 
Purman Maria £ ■ ■ • - 

:Purman William H • 
Fuller Calvin P 
I 

, Gardner Tr. Henry 
Gephart Frederick • 
Gilbert, Cobb and Johnson 
Giles Miss HeeU 
Gilliatt and Co. John 
Gilliatt end Co. John, and A Hatfield 
Gilbert P Curtis - 
Gowan and Marx 
Gookln W D > 
Godman J . . ■ ■ 

GroesbeckA 
'Grumman Lock wood 
Gregory Dudley S • 
Greenwood J .... 
Gruble Edward 
Greaves William 
Griffin Solomon - 
Gninnlng John Frederick 
iGudervllTe T A 



Hadden of London, George 



Hagar John D 
Hall " 



1 Daniel 

Hale A T., Guardian of £ A Thayer 
Hale Sylvester 
Hallibfrd W 6 • 
!HaIlam Mary 

Halt Margaret of Woodbam 
Hall Nathan D 

iHaleAT . . . . 

iHanneford Stephen 
iHankey William Alers 
iHancock. Esq., England, Richard 
Handy Edward S . • - 

HandyTr.ES 

HanceJP . . . . 

Hanson Andrew Nicholas 
Henna Thomae 
Harbine Thomas • 
Harmony Peter 
Hart Betsey Amelia 



m 

KM 
1« 



96 
30 



90 
4?0 



16 
96 
7% 
906 
166 
90 
96 
66 
18 
38 



10 

16 

156 

76 
46 



16 
146 

» 

90 
» 
90 
30 
1« 
80 



86 

3» 
90 
40 
10 

m 
so 

10 
60 
109 
56 



100 
],4U 



Digitized by 



Google 



SI 

InUrest dw to the Judders of the Five Per Cent. State Stock <^ iAm 
State of Indiana^ on the 1st of January^ IS^9. — Continued. 



jfmanui ^ Stock. 


StockhoUtrt' Ji'-ameg. 

i 


Amount of Intor^t. 


MO 


Hart William H . . . . 


10 


SOO 


Hart Henry 
HarriaonE - 




10 


1,000 






20 


1.000 


HaiTiaon Inm. M- 






20 


s^soo 


Harrison O - 






50 


loo 


Hartihornc Hugh - 






10 


2,000 


Haalcrrood Lewis H • 








40 


4,000 


Hendcraoii, Admr., Elira Ana 








80 


4;soo 


Herbert H 








00 


10,000 


Heygate Sir P W - 








200 


4,500 


Henr^' Alexander 








SO 


500 


Hildreth S P - 








10 


4,000 


Hirschfleld Mathilde • 








H) 


1400 


Hinliley and Co.. N 








30 


500 


Higgins Sarah Ann - 








JO 


3,500 


Howard Adderly - 








70 


10,000 


Hodgson J - 
Holden James 








900 


1,500 








00 


1,000 


Hope Reuben 






^ 


30 


36,500 


Hope and Co., Amsterdam 
Hoflmau Lewis Von - 








rjo 


5,000 






, 


]00 


14,000 


Hormewell H Hollis 








280 


$7,500 


Hulh and Co., Prederick 






^ 


^50 


2,500 


Hutchinson James 








50 


3,500 


Hume James - 






TO 


14,800 


Huth Prederlck - 






296 


7.400 


Huth Charles Fredorick 






.! 148 


15,500 


Hudson Thomas • 






i aio 


4.000 


Hysiop Robert 






80 


13,500 


InglisR 






270 


5,000 


Insingcr and Co • 






100 


2,500 


Janson Alford 






i 50 


2Sn 


Janson William 






30 


IJtOO 


Jennings Edward • 






! i!0 


2,000 


Jenkins George 






40 


1,000 


Jones Rev Charles 
Johnson W S 
Jockmus John 






'1 1 


ijm 


Jorves Miss M 






80 


1^ 


Jones Walter R - 






90 


2*,5Q0 


Johnson Samuel and Mgt. C 






50 


500 


Jones J D and C 






10 


2,500 


Jones Richard Lambert 






50 


1,000 
3,000 


Judson Charles • 

Kemp Robert 
Kean John • 
Kellogg Ann H • 
Kennedy L - 






20 

50 
10 
60 


5',S0O 








no 


ifiSo 


Kennedy DS 








250 


5S00 


Kelly Robert 








100 


i,«S 


Ketcham R and Bement • 








40 


Kendall Isaac C 






. 


40 


5>00 


KingRuAisH 








100 


nSoo 


Kingan John 






• 


220 


5,500 


Kirkpatrick R 8 • 








110 


500 


KingWH . 






* 


!«♦ 


4.000 


Kinney George • 








80 


11,350 


King and Sons James G 
Kintner Jacob L - 








237 


2,000 








40 


1000 


King Prors. W J - 






. 


20 


500 


Kinyon Vamnm 8 








ID 


1^000 


Kingsland AC 
Kolfe H W 








20 


3>00 








70 


1^ 


Kache> Egbert Jean 






. 


20 


ffO 


Krantler W 








10 


2,000 


Krantler andMeviUe 
KesainJnnr. Daniel 






• 


820 
40 



2D9 



Digitized by 



Google 



m 



InUrttt due to the holders of the Five. Per Cent. 
StaU of Indiana^ on tie 1st of January^ 1850.- 



Stats Sotkrftke 
-Continued. 



.Mm^unt 9f Slock. 



StoekkmUtrt* Jf*m0». 



8,0(.0 
S,U03 
5,000 

500 

14,000 

10/JOO 

4Ji\Hi 

4,500 

5.00i» 

SCO 

3.000 

5(0 

500 

3,C00 

8,010 

4,5 

50J 

5'iO 

3,00 > 

3.t00 

4,5J0 

1,500 

6,500 

l.nOO 
500 

90,000 

5,000 

1,500 

500 

500 

1,500 

10,000 

IS,500 
1.000 
3,006 
3.000 
7,700 
»,750 
1,000 
S.500 
1,000 
9,000 
0,500 
2,00) 
3,0)0 
5.00<i 
S,500 
7,400 
7,000 
2,500 
1,500 
3,500 
184.000 
3.500 

16,500 
1,000 

10,510 
7,000 
1,000 
4,500 
4,50J 
3,500 
3,500 

lO.sOO 
4,000 

S0,000 
4,500 



LafonU R 

Latornette C&tharlne 

Latimer Zebulon • 

Langton Joseph 

Laurence William • 

Larkini Tr. John P 

Langton Skinner - 

Laboucher John Charlee 

Lewis J H 

Leo Woolfe Dr WiUiam 

Leeds John W 

Lindsley John 

Uddard WiUiam, (Park Rd., Eng.) 

Lieber Francis • 

Ubon Thomas 

LightnerHorton 

Lloyd Sir W 

Lord David P - 

Lockwood Le Grand 

Laver Henry 

Luckett William G 

Lukes P G - 

Uikes and Lanes 

Luzmore Solon 

Mason John W 

Mahan D H 

Marti nex del Rio Gregorio Jose 

May hew William E 

MarberlyLW - 

Marshall Robert 

Maneroning R P and 8 • 

Mandaville Henry - 

Marsh Ralph • 

Marcuard and Co A 

Marshall M 

Martyn Major P M - 

Mansfield J K P 

McClaskey Patrick 

McCurdy R H - 

McDonald Richard - 

McDonalds and McKenues 

McKinney Abraham Smith • 

McLean Cornelius 

iMelviUe Hon A S « 

Mecklem George 

Meyer and Stuckcn 

Merritt Tr. Isaac 

Meynell rapt. H - 

Meiiicrtzhapar Daniel • 

Mister Charles • < 

Mills Tr. John - 

iMiller Ur. James W 

/Miller John (Perth, ScotPd.) 

Miller Samuel, Lynchburgh, Va. 

Mott and Bowne, Exs. of Bowne 

Moran and Iselin « 

Moulton Rodman G 

Moiling Geodfrey 

Morton Francis 

Morton Miss K £ 

Moon Edward - 

Moon James 

Moon Richard • 

Moon Robert 

Moss Furman - 

Mosi Joseph 

Morrison James 

Morrison Charles 

Moore William 



Jiwtcmnttf fnUnsu 



106 

'•^ 

380 
200 
90 
30 
100 
16 
60 
10 
10 
60 
40 
96 
16 
10 



30 
IW 

30 
10 

406 

106 
30 
16 
16 
36 

306 

396 
90 
66 
66 

154 
55 
96 
9> 
26 
46 

136 
46 
66 

106 
96 
48 

140 
56 
36 
90 
3,686 
56 

330 
36 

316 

146 
96 
96 
00 
50 
56 

900 
66 

406 
96 
16 



Digitized by 



Google 



83 



hierest due to the holderi cf the Fiv^ Per Cent. StaU Siock of the 
State of Indiana^ on the itt (f January ^ XSdO.-^Continued. 



jM0unt 9f suck. 


StockhoU^t' JfcMS*. 


Ammint cf I»t$r**t. 


soo 


Mullen WH and D Lloyd 


10 


i;80o 


Nevin William M - 


24 


3,W» 


New Yorlc Life Insurance and Tr. Co. 


^ ^ 


13,325 


NeiUon Bobert 


280 89 


7,300 


Nevin Rev. John W • 


148 


1,000 


Nevint and Co. R H 


20 


2,000 


Nicholaon Isaac L - - - 


40 


3,000 


North Olivia .... 


60 


4,060 


Norman O W - 


. 


80 


2,500 


Norman Henry 




50 


14,000 


Norton G W 


. 


280 


1.00O 


Norris William H 




20 


*'22 


Nuirent Walter - 


- 


20 


500 


NyeAT.,Tr 




10 


^'JS 


NycAuselinT - 


. 


» 


1,000 


Nye Alius - 




20 


h^ 


Ogden Georee 
Ogden Wiliram B 




20 


3,000 


... 


80 


i,coe 


Ogden Serena B 
Old Harriet 




9u 


1,000 


. 


SO 


1«,500 


Oliverson R 




33U 


3,300 


Oricll Viriash - 


. 


70 


7,000 


Osgood John 




40 


9,500 


Ottley Post and Whiting 


2? 


41,000 


Overend Qnrney andCo 


ttO 


2,000 


Paxtun Rev J D - 


82 


1,000 


Palmer Miss M. 


20 


«6,000 


Palmer McKillopD and CO - 


1,720 


SOO 


Patterson Col James 


10 


2,500 


Parenstedtt B and Shoemaker 


50 


7,500 


Palmer Alexander S - 


150 


800 


Parken, in Trust, Thomas - 


Jfi 


40,000 


PeacockeGenSirMW - 


80O 


1,000 


Pellet William B 


20 


5,000 


Pendegrast Sir J 


100 


e,ooo 


Perry Geoxge S • 


120 


1,000 


Peck Albert N .... 


20 


8,000 


Peck Read .... 


18» 


''5S 


Peabody, London, George 


150 


3,500 . 


Phelps Dodge and Co • ■ 


70 


12,500 


Philips Pierpont - . - 


S50 


500 


Phelps Charles .... 


10 


1.000 


Phelps Ann .... 


9U 


2,500 


PiggottJohn .... 


^ 


20,000 


Powers Edward S • - - - 


400 


6,000 


Potts Thomas . - - - 


126 


S? 


Powers H - 


^2 


500 


Preastley Edward 


16 


11,500 


Prevott and Co Mortis 


230 


735 


Prall David M - 


150 




Prosser Edward - - - - 


M 


12,500 


PulsfordR .... 


250 


2,500 


Pugh David 


50 


5,000 


QuinUna Pedro De La - 


ICO 


2,500 


Raincock Hugh D - - • 


SO 


1000 


Rankin David 


. 


20 


11400 


Parenshew J H ■ 




236 


500 


Rees James 




JO 


11,000 


Riggs Eliaha • 


. 


299 


10,000 


Rugart Emanuel C . 




206 


9^0 


Reed Rev Andrew 




169 


5,500 


Redmond William - 




116 


8400 


Richardson Sir W B 




' J» 


500 


ReilyAB • 




6 


4,0CO 


Robertson Archibald 


■ 


.8 




Robinaott Thomas . 





Digitized by 



Google 



84 

hterBM dnt to lAe kMers of the Five Per Cent. Stale Stock of tki 
State (ff Indiana^ m the 1st of January, 1850. — Continued. 



Jm^rntu of St0ek. 



mtkholAirM* Jr9mt9. 



1,500 

§.000 

1,000 

500 

500 

5,000 

5,000 

»5,500 

3^,000 

1,000 
S.500 
4,000 
5,000 
10,000 
5,000 
3,000 
t,500 
4,000 
>,000 



1S,000 
3,000 
1,000 
4,500 
1,500 
1,000 
9,500 
3,500 
S,SOO 
1,000 
1,500 
5,500 
7,000 
4,000 
S,000 
2,500 
5,000 
«,500 
6,000 
4,500 
4,500 
1,500 
1,000 
500 
4,500 
85,000 
lfi,500 
196,000 

1,000 
4.500 
3,000 
fi,(00 
«,500 
2,500 
1,500 
8,000 
3,000 

98,500 

19,000 
3,000 

90,000 

8,500 

500 

19,000 
9,500 

90,000 



Robinson George - 

Roee John 

Robert and Willi amt 

Robert Williem 8 

Robert Daniel 

Robert Jane 

Rogers and Haaeltine, Bxs., 

Rodrigues F J - 

Rothchilds and Sons M N 

Ryall Daniel B . 

Sandlbxd William A 

Safe D H • 

Say Tr, Lucy W 

Saunders Robert 

Salter Samuel - 

Scott Alfred V 

Scbermerhorn Peter 

Seignette Alexander 

^^cymoar Isaac • 

Schrcede and Switier 

Samuel Mrs Henrietta, London 

Shore George W 

Shepherd John of London 

Sherrell Robert 

Sheffield W 

'Sherbrooke Lady Catharine 

Short Rev Daniel H 

Sherwood Edwin • 

Sheilds James R 

Shank H • 

ISistare Tr. G K 

iSistare Miss Nancy 

Silver Thomas T 

Silver James 

Silver Dr W - 

Simmons James 

Skelton G H • 

Smith H P 

Smith David - 

Smith Austin 

Smith Hugh C - 

Smith Mrs Isabella K 

ISmith Sophia and Harriet 

Smith Charlotte - 

ISmith J C . 

Smith A Hamilton - 

Smith Abel • 

Smith S G (Brighton) 

Smith S G.. Lombard st., 

Smee William 

Smee Emma - 

Smith Willlamana E 

Smith St. John 

'Smith Eliza 

|Snyder Joseph R 

.Spencer John S 

iSpotten Thomas 

S Stuart James 

iStarkweather Samuel • 

iStokes Thomas 

Sturges Jonathan 

Stock Mrs C 

Starling Lyne - 

Suin F W 

Strurer Charles - 

Stancomb William 

Sumner Alanson 

Swarez L 8 Tr. for ZuletU and Co 

Swarez L S Tr. Pedro de La Quintans 

Swan Caleb 




90 

10 

10 

100 

100 

11,110 

TW 

90 
50 
80 
100 

vo 

60 
60 
50 

80 

60 
59 

9«n 
60 
80 
90 
90 
90 
So 
50 
50 
80 
%\ 

110 

140 
8D 
40 
50 

100 

180 
180 
90 
80 
30 
80 
10 
80 

sdo 

9,5» 
100 
Sn 
130 
60 
40 
130 
50 
3D 
40 
6<l 
450 
MO 



50 

10 
940 

50 

50 
4ii0 

80 



Digitized by 



Google 



85 



Interest due to the holders of the Five Per Cent. State Stock of the 
State of Indiana^ on the 1st of Janumy, 1850.— Continued. 



Jim0unt af St^k. 


8t0ckk0U«rt' JV«m«#. 


dfaiswK tf tntTtMU 


3,800 


T&ylorPeterC 


76 


J.SOO 


Taylor Pranck • 






30 


4.500 


Thomas Horatut L - 








20 


500 


Tbompaon W • 








16 


500 


Thnring C and E W 








16 


9,000 
500 


ThomMon G«orge 
Titxe Herman J 








40 
10 


5,000 


Tone Catharine Ami, Tr 








166 


8,500 


Tone Catharine Ann 








176 


10,000 


Trumbull John F 








206 


sooo 


Treadwell John W • 








40 


15,000 


Truatees Smith Charitiea 








306 


^•SS 


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40 


1,000 


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26 


6,000 


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120 


i^ 


Tucker Henry, London - 








SO 


2.500 


Tunia C C 








50 


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TuniiNchemiah 








10 


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Turball Juball 








260 


10,000 


Tweedy Bdmund 








200 


30,000 


Twining T 








610 


2,500 


Twynam Charles 








50 


1,000 


Von Dem Basclw Dr Gehtrd 








20 


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VoorhiilraC 








10 


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Vanderhoff John 








16 


1,000 


Vaaaai John G 








20 


2,500 


Van Vleck Margaret Ann 








50 


500 


VlallMrsKlixa . 








10 


1.000 


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20 


18,500 


Watkinson Robert 








300 


6,000 


WakemanZB 








120 


1^006 


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WaUinaon David • 








20 


10,900 








210 


13,000 


Wetmore and Cryder - 








260 


500 


Webb Orlando 








10 


5,000 


Weed Pt. Nathaniel 








100 


31500 


Weeks and Co 








76 


S,500 


Wells John 








56 


2:500 


WellsNP . - 








56 


33,000 


Wetmore William S 








660 


2,500 


Webster Hosea 








50 


5,000 


Weed Harvey - 








160 


2^ 


Wheeler Rev Daniel 








50 


1000 


Whittlesey Jared P 








20 


4,500 


Whitewnght William 
Wheeler WL - 








86 


2^00 








50 


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Wheeler J L and L and James 








120 


2>0 


White Miles . 








96 


57^ 


Whlteman J C 








1,140 


!S!o 


White Rev Samuel 








10 


0,600 


Williamson Pt. D U 








182 


0,000 


WilkinsandCo 








180 


2.000 


Wesner Gabriel 








46 


3,000 


Williams Jesse L 








60 


131500 


Wilkinson W 








270 


3^ 


Windsor WH . 








66 


10,000 


Williams W 








2li6 


15,000 


Wilson and Co Thomas, London 








300 


6,500 


Wilson Sir J M 








130 


500 


WilletU Amos 








10 


5,500 


Winslow, Unier and Co 








110 


500 


Woodbury Levi 
Wood R W 








16 


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160 


81,000 


Woolf Arnold J 








1,620 


20,000 


Wood Silas 








400 


500 


Woodard William 








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Wood Grant and Co 








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Wyman Samuel G . 








100 



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REPORT OF 



ALLEN MAY, 



AGENT OF STATE, 



FROM 



FEBRUARY 1, 1850, TO DECEMBER 1, 185Q. 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



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REPORT. 



INDIANA- AGENCY, ) 

New York, N. Y., December 1st, 1850. ) 

To the Honorable^ 

The Legislature of Indiana : 

The Agent of State is required by law to make a report to ^acfi 
successive session of the Legislature, of what has been done during 
the preceding year in relation to the public debt of the State, and 
whathas heretofore been called the suspended debt. In performing 
this duty at the present time, I have the honor to submit that the 
business of this offiqd as far as I have learned has wprked satisfacto- 
rily under the system devised by my predecessor. 

When I reached this city last winter to take charge of the office 
I found it kept at the office of Winslow, Lanier & Co., ^2 Wall 
Street, and rent being very high in that street I concludjed to move 
the office, and rented a room in Nassau Street, No. 20, at t)i6 h^d 
of the second flight of stairs, and on the same floor and near the 
office of Charles Butler, Esq., Trustee of the Wabash and Erve 
Canal, and a few doors from Wall Street. 

There was no safe for the books of the office when I came into 
the office, and no law authorizing the purchase of one. I bought 
one on my own responsibility, at $210 00, a lai^ commodious 
article of Welder's patent. I suggest the propriety of the State 
paying for it. 



2D10 



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90 



BONDS SURRENDERED. 

According to the last annual report of the Agent, 
there was outstanding on the 20th day of Novem- 
ber, 1849, one thousand (bur hundred and eighty* 
three, $1*483 

There has been cancelled since that titne up to Decern* 

ber 1st, 1850, 316 

Reducing the outstanding number on the 1st day of 

December, 1850, to ' . . . $1,167 

FIVE PER CENT. STATE STOCK. 

There had been issued, prior to July 1st, 1850, four 
millions eight hundred and eighty-five thousand five 
hundred dollars, $4385,500 

There has been issued since that time up to December 

1st, 1850, 55,500 

Making of five per cent. State Stock December 1st, 

1850, $4,9414)00 



TWO AND A HAI<F PER CElfT. STATE STOCK. 

There had been issued prior to July 1st, 1849, one mil- 
lion six hundred and ninety-eight thousand eight 
hundred and ninety-seven dollars and fifty cents,* •$1,698,897 50 

There has been issued since that date up to December 

1st, 1850, 86,355 00 

Making of 2i per cent. State Stock Dec. 1st, 1850,- .$1,795,252 50 



PREFERRED CANAL STOCK FOR PBINCIPAI. MONEYS. 

There is outstanding of this stock four millions sev- 
enty-nine thousand five hundred, dollars,* $4,079,500 



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•PaciAL nUBPBBmSD CAJIAI. ITUCX FOB IHTBElBiT. 

There had been issued according to the last report of 
the Agent, up to July 1st, 1849, one million two 
hundred and thirteen thousand six hundred and 
twenty.five dollars, $1,313,625 

There has been issued since that time up to December 

1st, 1850, on account of subscribed coupons, 2,200 

Makine of special preferred canal stock December Ist, 

185^,... I:..... fl,215,8!l5 



DEFERRED CAKAL STOCK FOR PRINCIPAL MONBYS* 

There had been issued prior to July 1st, 1849, six hun- 

dred and eighty* five thousand five hundred dollars, $685,500 

There has been issued since that time up to December 

1st, 1850, 175,500 

Making of deferred canal stock December 1st, 1850, $861,000 



8PBCIAI. DEFERRED CANAL STOCK FOR INTEREST, 

There had been issued prior to July 1st, 1849, one 
hundred and ninety-eight thousand six hundred 
doflars, $198,600 

There has been issued since that time up to December 

1st, 1850, 52,000 

Making of special deferred canal stock December 1st, 

18W, $250,600 



Accompanying this report I flirnish an abstract of the Bonds sur- 
rendered since February 4, 1850, abstracts of the transfera of all 
the stocks transferable at this office, an abstract of the expenses of 
the office this year, including salary, stationery, and postage, an ab- 
stract of the interest paid to the holders of five per cent. State stock, 
and an abstract of the interest yet due on back dividends which has 
not been called for. 

Permit me to assure you that I have adopted the strictest and 
most rigid rules of economy in this office. I fiad the labor of the 
office increasing as the demand increases for the stocks. 

Respectfully, 
A. MAY, 

Agtid of State. 



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Amount of InlereU paid by Allen May, Agent of Slate of Indiana, to 
the holders of Indiana Five Fer Vent. Slate Stock, from the 4lh 
day of of february, 1850, to the 1st day of Decetnber, 1850. 






SUekUlUrt Xames. 






rrhtn PaU. 



im*t 0/ fuUrest w*«ii dtu. 



• • • • . • 



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8^1 
1^ 
9,000 

s,ooo 

8300 
7,000 

s,soo 

soo 

900 
1,000 

lAO 

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3,&0 
9L0 

5,ao 

SB,000 
3,S0O 
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3,000 
VlJSOil 
3,000 

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1,5 
S,000 

SOO 

4,000 

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«,000 

24,UO 

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t,000 

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l.ti00 

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1,500 

i,sou 

7300 

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3,000 I 
S,000 

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Richard McDonald, 

Bea!«, By«h aad Co 

Ckarlotte SmiUi, 

Thomas Black and Co., 

John G VaMon, 

Sflveater Hale, 

A l exaadw Sergoett, 

Ooorgo Uaddeo, of London,. ., 

Lyman Allyn, 

ChriatUn u Emaon, 

Henrietta Samuel, 

Bdwaid Preatley, by £zn^ . . 

Jajnee Brown, 

Cornelina McLean, 

Wm and Jamea Currie, 

John R Broadhead, 

St John Smith, 

SDeMacedo 

Pedro Do La4iulntana 

COmmercini Bank, Albany,.. 

Albany Savinga Bank, 

JDPazton, 

Prancie J Dallas. 

A Marcnard and Co,, 

OllTerM North, 

James Reas, 

Henry Mandevlile 

Joshua Simmons, 

DHMalian 

Praeman Moss, 

JosmhMoss 

DanfelC Ambler, 

PJRodriguet, 

Hugh Barclay, 

O W Norton,. 



Charles Craske. 

John R Browning,. .. 

Leti Woodbury, 

John W Mason, 

laaac Davis, 

William A Sanford, . 

Ployd Tucker, 

James W Miller, .... 
John Mills, Trustee,. 
Alfred N Scott, . 



I 1850. 
f 90 I Pobruary 5, 
4U I PebmaryS. i 
OU . February 8, i 
SO j February il, . 
90 February 11,1 
, 40 February 19, i 
SO : February 112, < 
40 , February 19, i 
56 , February 13, V 
140 I February 13,! 
50 t February 15,! 
10 , February 19, 1 
10 I Febbuary 90,1 
40 ; February 91, 
90 , February 91, 
February ^ 
February 97, 
February 97, 
February 97, 
February 97, 
February 97, 
February 98, 
March 4, 
March 4, 
March 4. 
March «, 
March ~ 



L..I....I 



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.... 90 


20 









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10 

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100 

590 

70 

59 

60 

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10 

30 

40 

10 



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40 . 
90 . 
SO 1. 
90 . 
40 '. 
50 |. 
40 . 
56 '. 
140 ' 
50 L 

10 ;. 

10 1. 
40 . 
90 L 

10 L 



March 7, 
, March 8, 
9(«0 March 9. 
80 ; March 0, 
"" March 0, 
March 11, 
March 11, 
March 11, 
March 19, 
March 19, 
March 13, 
March 13, 
March 14. 
March 14, 
March 14. 



90 

100 

490 

980 

90 

40 

10 

90 

SO 

90 

190 



30 ' March 15, 



Thomas!B DaTis,. 
James l' W 



Whittlesey, .. 

John Agate, 

Htxrison Dnrkee 

N Hinkley and Co 

B Parrington, 

Lock wood Grumman, . 

John WNeTin 

Aim Smith McKinney, 

Alanson Sumner, 

VjRlnyon, 

Samuel Brown,. 



WliUamMNevin 

WDGookin, 

Idward Jennings 

Elisabeth Pish 

Miss Hester Giles, 

John Jockmns, 

John Bills, 

JOSmith, 

George Grant, Pr. Adm.,. 
Charles Bfid 



90 
60 
90 
90 
30 
10 
SO 
00 
140 
146 
90 
50 
10 
10 
94 
90 
90 
10 
10 
60 
100 
90 
30 



March 18. 
March 19, 
March 9u, 
March 91, 
March 28, 
Aprils, 
April 4, 
Aprils, 
Aprils. 
Aprils, 
April 19. 
April 19, 
April 10, 
April 96, 
April 901, 
May 7, 
May 10, 
May 10, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 16, 
May 99. 
May 98. 
June 4. 



.|...., 



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70 

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60 

950 

60 

10 

3U 

40 

10 

900 

80 

90 

100 

490 

980 

10 

40 

10 

90 

SO 

90 

190 

30 


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Amount of Inlerest paid by Allen May^ Agent of State of Indiana, to 
the holder's of Indiana Five Per Cent. State Stocky from the 4/A 
day of Februaryl850, to the 1st day of December, 1850.— C(Wi- 
tinved. 



Sttkh^ld4r*' Jfmmet. 



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1 Am't of Itatrest whn U«. 



Wh^n Paid. 



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'WllUam 8 Johnson, 

Joseph Langton, 

Mark W Collet, 

M W Collet. In tntst for Ueadlam,. 

George Banks, 

T R Auldjo 

John Auldjo, 

Baring, Brothers and Company.. . . 

William T Blair, 

Alexander Baillie, 

Kdwaid Bridgemaa, < 

Walter Camborne, 

Thomas C Crawford, 

Sarah DiUwin 

P L B Dykers and J G and H C 

Marshall, 

John Gilllatt and Co 

John Gilliatt and A HatAeld,. . . 

William A Hanker, 

Margaret Hart, 

Hope and Co., of Amsterdam, .. 
do. 

William J aneson, 

Altered Janeson 

James G King and Sons, » . . 

William Llddani, 

Jean Charles Laboucbere, 

John Miller. 

CreorgeM w Peacock,.... 

Col. Joseph Patterson, 

CapUln J T Evans, 

R. Kyken, 

Captain Thomas Byre, 

JohnN Foster, 

Rev. John Frampton, 

Richard Fall, 

Ferguson and others, Trastees,. 

Miss.\ P Ferguson 

J Godman, 

Gen John Graham, 

J Greenwood, 

Edward Grubb, 

FA Gudvllle, 

Adderly Howard, 

HHebbert, 

K Harrison, 

M Harrison, Jr., 

G Harrison, 

SirF WHeygate 

J Hodgson, 

James Hutchison, • 

Lewis H Hatlewood, 

Joseph Home < 

Stephen HannefordL, 

Thomas UodJion, 

RIngUs 

George Jenkins, 

Richard L Jones, < 

John Kinyan 

R O Kirkpatrick, 

L Kennedy, 

Kraentber and Mievi He, 

WKraenther, 

Robert Hemp, 

Thomas dehnii 



401 
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900 
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70 

100 

310 

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50 

980 

no 

110 

9eo 

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127 

'nouut of Interest paid by Allen May, Agent of State of Indiana^ to 
the holders of Indiana Five per cent. State Stocks from the 4th day 
of February, 1S50, to the 1st day of December, 1850. — Continued. 



Stpckkoldert* A'a»««. 




,000 
1,500 ! 
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),(MMJ I 
SOOO i 
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1000 
!,500 
!,500 
!,000 
1^1 

500 
i.J00 
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500 
,500 
^,500 
1,500 

500 
1,500 

500 
1,500 
•,000 
i,000 
t,0<iO 
,000 

sooo 

1,500 
i,500 
{.000 
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t,0QO 

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1,000 

1,500 

1,500 

(,500 

I.UOO 

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1,000 

1,000 

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1.500 

\000 

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!,500 

1,500 

1.500 

!,5U0 

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1,000 I 

1,000 ' 

!,500 , 

,000 

1,500 ' 

,000 1 

!,ooo ! 
;,5oo I 

!,500 

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,000 
,000 , 
■,0M) 



Henry L^ver, 

JHLewia, 

F CLuket 

P C Lukes «nd Thofl. and M Laiue, 

Thomas Potts 

Thomas Stokes, 

Baren Augaste l>e Steinberg, 

Robert Sannders 

Hugh D Raincock, 

Henry Tucker, 

George Thompson, 

8 Swining, 

John Vandenhoff, 

James Aitkens 

John Vf Anderson, < 

William Broad 

Roberto L Reran, t 

Arthur Bally, 

Margarette Betts,.... 

James Bagnall, 

Geo and Jas Bagnall, Exra., , 

GBagnall, 

Bouverie and Company, 

MmCLBenyon, 

T Brass 

MrsB Chester 

CapelCure, 

Gen Oeorgs Carpenter, 

Morgan C Chase, , 

Sir William Collings, 

Major Bdward iiarrall,... 

C ilron, 

William Dockar 

Miss Maria I'enman, 

Thomas nixon, 

Samuel Dobree, 

MissB r»ent, - 

John Dillon, 

Thomas ]>ent,. 

Col Francis A Daniel, 

Quintin Dick, 

John Evans, 

John P Larkln, 

Solon Luxmnre, 

(Godfrey Moling 

Francis Morton, 

Miss Katherine S Morton, 

CapUin H Meynall, ./ 

Edward Moon 

James Moon 

Richard Moon,. 

Robert Moon, 

James Morrison, 

M Marshall, 

M^or P Martyn , 

George W Norman, 

Henry Norman, 

Walter Nugent, 

ROlWlerson, 

Orerend, Gurney and Co., 

William H Ogden 

John Plggot, 

RPttUfdrd 

Sir J Prendergrast, 

MlssM Palmer, 

Palmer, McKillop, D«nt and Co.,. . 
George Poabody, 



AmU of Interest when due. 



When Paid. 



.1 



III Jill; ^g!|i 



^•^-1' 



00 

90 

00 

90 

12W 

6<t0 

150 

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50 

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310 

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311 

410 

30 

10 

110 

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90 

100 

101) 

40 

200 

I'iO 

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5'» 

40 

2,0(«0 

40 

40 

lO*) 

70 

270 

130 

2.880 

180 

20 

120 

280 

170 

210 

140 

20 

50 

90 

9J 

50 

50 

590 

20 

60 

80 

50 

20 

330 

820 

60 

50 

25'J 

100 

20 

1,720 

340 



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do 
do 
do 
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do 
do 
do 
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do 
do 
do 
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do 
eo 
do 
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do 
do 
do 

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do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
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do 
do 
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do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



60 

9» 

9» 

30 

120 

6(0 

ISO 

100 

50 

50 

40 

610 

10 

310 

20 

10 

30> 

410 

.30 

10 

110 

10 

90 

100 

ion 

40 
200 
100 

so 

50 
40 

s,noo 

4& 

40 

100 

70 

2711 

130 

2,880 

J80 

20 

120 

280 

17l» 

2t0 

J40 

20 

50 

90 

90 

SO 

SO 

590 

20 

60 

80 

50 

20 

330 

820 

60 

50 

250 

100 

20 

1,720 

340 



Digitized by 



Google 



IJ8 

Amount of Inter est paid by Alkn Maxff Agent of Slate of Indiane^it 
the holders of Indiana Fiv^ per cent. State Stocky from the 4th dai 
of February y 1850, to the \st day of December^ 1850. — Cxndivud. 



'^ , 


stockholders' Xumot. 


1^ 


! Jim't 9f Ittrut whn tii 


r 


"■■"'■ m.mM'i 



5jaoo 

S,50U 

5,000 

510 

3,500 

luUOO 

13,000 

JS,000 
2,500 
500 
8,500 
5,000 
9,500 

U,500 
150J 
4.5'!0 
500 
1,500 
S.50U 
3,500 
3,50i» 
S,000 
S, 00 

57,U0U 
9,000 

13,50U 
5,000 

15,0,10 
6,50u 
8.5)0 
5J0 
S,5<>0 
3,U00 
2,5J0 
5,500 

' 7,U00 

s,noo 

4,K)0 
4AK> 
1,500 
S,500 
3,800 
S18,U0O 

15,000 
6,000 
],5<10 

70,600 

8,000 

500 

33,U00 

20,000 

3,000 

2,000 

500 

]n,000 
3,500 
4,500 
.1,510 
4,000 
500 
1,5«)0 
6,5)0 

10,000 

3,500 

500 

18,500 



Edvrard Proaser, 

G H Skelton 

HPSmith 

William HSUnlon 

i»HSafe, 

Samuel Salter 

William Stancomb, 

George K Shore, 

John Mr Rhodes 

Thomas R Robinson 

Sir W H Richardson 

Thomas Robinson, 

Andrew Reed * 

J H Revinshaw, . . : 

G Robinson, 

HoDoratus L Thomas, 

W Thompson 

Miss Mary Praddle, 

Charles Twyman, 

Oriel Viveash 

NL Wheeler 

J L Wheeler, 

L Wheeler, 

J C Whlteraan, 

Wilkins and Company. 

W Wilkinson, 

R W Wood 

Thomas Wilson and Co.,Ijondon, , 

Sir J W Wilson, 

haniel Wheeler 

Orlando Webb 

Thomas Yates, 

Mrs Charlotte Stock, 

HShank. 

Thomas Y Silver, 

James Silver, » 

Joseph Wheeler, 

lirWSilver, 

W Sheffield 

Lady < atherine Sherbrook 

PWStein. 

John Noble, 

Samuel Miller, 

charities Smith, Trustee, 

Austin Smith 

Sophia and Harriett Smithy. 

Thomas Hanna, 

Gowan and Marx,' 

William Lawrence, 

John Ferguson, of N. Y., 

John B Smith, of London, 

. Henry Gardner, Trustee, 

John Beadnall, 

George Beadnall, 

Edmund Powie, 

Samu^ and Mary C Johnson, 

Sir William Loyd, 

WHKolle 

Miss Mary Jones, 

W H Mullen and U Lloyd, 

LW MabCTly 

A L Melville 

James Pierson, 

I >avid Pugh 

R and P and S Malnwarlng 

fi G Smith, of Brighton, 



t 
iOO 
5U 

1(10 

10 

50 
20U 
840 
240 

50 

10 
170 
100 

1»« 

230 I 
30 
00 I 
10 ! 
30.1 
50 
TO 
50 
40 
40 
1,140 
'180 
870 
100 

300 ; 

190 . 
50 ' 
J« , 

5ti; 

60 
50 
1I« 

40 
«t» 
90 
30 

40 

••J 

4'J 
|0 

50 

00 

70 

80 

10 

30 

130 

300 

50 

10 

370 



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do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
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do 
do 
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do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



::::|::::':::;:::;: 

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129 



mount of Interest paid by Allen May, Agent of State of Indiana, to 
the holders of Indiana Five Per Cent. State Stock, from the 4th day 
of February, 1850, to the 1st day of December, 1850. — Continued. 




3,000 

1,000 
?,<.oo 

»,0(J0 

1,000 I 

j,000 . 

2JC0 ; 

r,ooo 

5,000 i 
■1,000 I 
7,.-, 1 

500 ; 

1,000 ' 
3,000 I 
?,000 I 
3,000 I 
4,000 ! 
7,500 I 
7,400 I 
7,40iJ ! 
7,000 I 
I.50O 
7,400 ' 
2,500 
3,500 
6,500 
3,'O0 
0,000 
3,000 
B,000 
2.501 
2.000 
2,500 

71.0 
7,500 
i.noo 
1,500 
3,0 
5,<!00 
2.5'K) 
6,500 
4,50> 
8.000 
5,500 
5,000 
1,000 
1,000 
4v00 , 
1.000 
5,000 

500 , 
2,500 
«.fK)0 
5.000 
3,500 
2,20 ■» 
3,000 i 
8,000 ! 
1 5,00' » 1 
^2,000 I 
5,000 I 
2.500 I 
O.WO I 
K),000 ' 

1,000 ; 

4.000 



SG Smith, (of London,) 1 

"William Smee I 

EmmaSmee 

John Shepherd 

Abel Smiths i 

George Wallace ' 

"W Williams : 

John S Spencer ■ 

Frederick Averille, Jr., ; 

Warren W Averille | 

AlfredVScott 

Pierpont Phillips | 

Henry Hart i 

Charles Jones I 

Edward E Powers I 

John Osgood ' 

William G Lucket | 

Lucy WSay, (Trustee,) i 

F Huth and company 

Charles F Huth 

John F Gruning i 

Richard Hancock ; 

Freehlen and Goschen i 

Daniel Meinertzhagen 

n 8 Kennedy I 

John F0rguson,(of Irvine, N. Y.,)..j 

J R Snyder 

Wm H and Caroline Conklin 

Jeremiah Clarke I 

.»ohn Nfiradley 

Thomas Cotierell ' 

Joseph Battelle | 

Jacob L Kintner ; 

James R Shields I 

Mary A Lawrence ' 

New York Saving Bank ' 

Henry Waterman { 

Morris Prcvost and < ompany ; 

E J F C Paulin Dc Seigneux, • 

Nathaniel Weed I 

Esteran Oomineck j 

Moran and Joselin 

Jamos A Houseman 

E P Heyer and Company 

William Redmond, (Trustee,).. 

Samuel G Wyman 

James Floy .' 

Do 

Robert Hyslop 

Daniel B Phillips 

Robert Watkinson 

Amos Willets 

Cammann and Whitehouse 

Filas Wood 

Murray Forbes 

Joseph D Beers 

Henry Dexter 

Meyer and Stucken 

R Lafenu 

Alex. H Wolotlkowies 

Adams and Sturges 

Harvey Weed 

Edwin Sherwood 

Adolphus Bach 

Gilbert, Cobb and Johnson 

Dr Gerhard Von den Busch 

Mathelde H!rschf\«W 

2015 



2,520 
JOO 

20 

60 
500 

SO 
200 

50 
140 

100 I 

60 

150 I 

10 ! 

40 1 
600 
140 ' 

00 

80 
550 
148 
148 
140 

30 
148 
250 
470 
130 

61 
1,300 

60 
560 

50 

40 

50 

14 
750 

20 
230 

60 
100 
850 I 
330 

90 I 
130 > 
JIO 
100 

20 ! 

20 I 

80 

20 I 

100 ' 
10 
50 ; 

400 

10 1 i 
70 I 

**! 
6i> I 

160 j 

300 t 

3,440 ! 

100 I 

50 

SlO 

400 I 

BO ' 



1850. 
July 1, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



20 



201 



2,520 
100 

80 

60 
500 

S>| 
SOD 

50 
140 
100 

60 
150 

10 

80 
600 
140 

60 

80 
550 
148 
148 
140 

30 
148 
850 
470 
130 

60 
1,900 

60 
560 

50 

40 

14 
750 
SO 

stso 

60 
100 
850 
330 

90 
l«l 
110 
100 

20 



80 

20 

10ft 

10 

50 

40O 

100 

70 

44 

60 

160 

300 

3,440 

HO 

50 

910 

400 

20 

80 



Digitized by 



Google 



130 

AmoufU of Interest paid by Alien May^ Agent of State of Indiana^ iff 
the holders of Indiana Five Per Q^nt. State Stock , from the 4tk day 
of February y 1850, to the \st day of December^ 1850. — Continued. 



"^ 



8t0ckkeld9r»' A*«»««. 



'Amt. ef ImUriMt wktn fmid. 



When P9i4. l^^U^a 



'?li45;:^2i 4| 1 11 



1,000 
1,500 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
8,000 

18,500 

500 

4,500 

13,000 

51,175 

13,335 
2,0.0 

11,000 
8,500 
7,000 
500 
S,500 

45,500 
555,500 
6,500 
0,000 
6,000 

18,300 

10,500 
000 
3,000 
1,000 
5,000 
9,500 

13.000 
S,500 
8.000 
3,500 
3,000 
3,500 
6,000 
3,000 
1,000 
11,000 
1,000 

33.000 

500 

500 

600 

5,000 

1,000 

6,500 

5(0 

8,000 

500 

4,000 

1,000 

1,500 

S,500 

11,500 
3,500 

14,000 
9,500 
500 
500 
1,500 
3,000 

27,450 
5,000 

81,000 
1,500 



G«or|eK Riatare 

MiM Nancy Sistare 

John G Vasson 

Homer Waller 

Jaraes Coggeshall 

John Jockmui 

WilliamG Breese 

Samuel Nimmona 

William Whitewrighl 

Jamea Cook (of Indiana,) 

William B Astor 

Robert Neilson 

Williams Johnson 

EHsha RigR« 

Philo Buckingham 

Charleji Mixtcr 

Blood H Cutter 

Margarette Ann Van VIock 

AuguBte Belmonte 

N M Rothicbilds and Sons, 

Reed Peck 

Zebulon Latimer 

Schnederand Switzer 

Frederick Huth 

David Watkinuon 

Maria E Furman 

William Hunter *. 

Abraham S ftJcKinney 

EBBarton 

Otley , Post and Whiting 

Wetmore and Cryder 

Miles White 

Joseph Drake 

John Mills, (Trustee,) 

Sylvester Hale ■ 

CCTunis 1 

ZB Wakeman I 

N Y Life Insurance and Trust Co.,. . • 
Buckingham, Stuiges and Conover,' 

HHHunnewell j 

Egbert Jean Koche , 

William S Wetmore 

John Dow, (by Ex'rs,) ' 

Do ; 

Nehemiah Tunis t 

W E Rodgers,(by Ex'rsi I 

WalterR Jones 

Floyd Tucker 

John R Broadhead '• 

Joseph Richardson 

James Rees 

George Kinney 

WJ King 

J C Ackerman ; 

Pevenstedt and Schumacher 

Henry Escher ' 

Escher and Rusch, (in Trust,) ; 

Jubal Turbal ! 

David Smith 

LeGrand Lock wood 

Wood, Grant and Company 

Daniel Hall 

Saint John Smith 

Wlnslow, Lanier and Company. 

P J Rodriguez 

Arnold Junius Wolff. 

Pranck Taylor 



80 
30 I 

SO ! 

10 I 

30 I 

100 

1.110 

10 

90 

960 

1,0231 

9661 

40 

230 

50 

140 

10 

50 

010 

11,110 

130 

100 

130 

366 

210 

18 

60 

SO 

100 

190 

360 

50 

J60 

50 

40 

50 

126 

60 

20 

930 

2t) 

660 

10 

le 

10 I 
100 I 

soi 

130 

10 ! 

160 

10 

80 

30 

30 

50 

930 

50 

380 

190 

10 

10 

30 

60 

549 

107 

1,630 

30 



185". 

July 1, 
do 
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do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

July 2. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
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do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
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1.... 


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11110 

130 

109 
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368 

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lio 

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160 
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131 

Amount of Interest paid bt/ Alien May, Agent of SlcUe of Indiana, to 
the holders of Indiana Five Per Cent. IState Stock, from the 4<A day 
of February, 1850, to the 1st day of December, 1850. — Continued. 






8tPckM9U0r9* A"<i«eJ. 






I Jimt. of Inttrttt vk»* 4u* 



V 



IFhtn Paid. 






5,000 
S0.0OO 
13,000 

9,000 

5,000 
500 

9n,ooo 

2,000 

2,000 
10,000 
17.000 

4.000 

1,000 

1.000 

5,000 
500 

3,500 

3.000 

34,500 

500 

2,000 

«,000t 

1,000 I 

1,000 I 

3,000 , 

s,soo ; 

13,000 I 
20,000 I 

1,000 ! 

500 « 
10,3110 I 
1,000 I 
1,000 I 

500 ' 
3,000 
2,000 

500 
1,000 
16,000 
10,00) 
1,500 
4,000 
3.00 i 
2.000 

500 
1,000 
4,500 
8,000 
8,500 
2,000 
3,000 
2,500 
1,000 
4,000 
4.000 

500 
1,000 
4.00U 

500 
1,500 
^fSOO , 

Voo I 

1,000 
S,500 ! 
13,600 1 

l^\ 
2.500 ' 



Andrew N Hanton 

Wilbert Curtis 

Ch&rlM Davit, (Adm'rof Clarke,}. 

D D Williamson, (Pre«.,) 

WilliamE Mahew 

AT Nye, (Trustee.) 

Gregory Jose Del Kliio Marlines.. 

William H H&rbcck 

J HHarbcck 

Moses Allen 

R Bell and William Maclochlan.. 

Ann Elixa Henderson, Adm'x 

David Rankin 

Serena B Ogden 

Dr. William Lee Wolf 

John Kean 

J LBaker 

Francis J Dallam 

William Bard and Son 

Kev. Samuel White 

George Hadden (of London) 

Charles C Converse 

John Rose 

Joseph L Fry 

James Dicker 

Raphael Ue Fenari 

Charles M orrison 

Demas Doming 

Arius Nye 

Charles Phelps 

Brown. Brothers and Company. . . 

O T Duisbury 

Hiram Jelliff. 

Wi Uiam H Hart 

Betsey A Hart 

John W Treadwell 

Robert Marshall 

Jared P Whltilesey 

Henri Simeon 

Joseph Ines Pageott 

George N Allen 

Isaac L NickoUon 

John Lindsley 

Marcus B I »ouglass 

Hrs Eliia Viall 

JohnW Mason 

Nathan Robins 

Catharine A Tone, (in Trust,) 

Catharine A Tone 

JFHance 

Peter Schenucrhorn 

Mrs Henrietta Samuel 

Robert Sherwell 

Dudleys Gregory 

l»o 

Buys De Bordes and Jordan 

W H Norris 

Patrick Farming 

DP Lord 

Solomon GrifAn 

George R Chetwood 

Patrick McLoskey 

SO Abel 

Albion, Bank of 

David Fleming 

Alexander S Palmer 

Mott and Bowne. (Kxerutora,) 





1850. 


100 


July 3. 


400 


do 


240 1 


do 


192 


do 


100 1 


do 


10 ; 


do 


400 


do 


40 ' 


do 


40 : 


do 


200 


do 


340 


do 


80 


do 


20 


July 5. 


20 ; 


do 


100 


do 


10 


do 


70 


do 


60 


do 


eoo 1 


do 


10 1 


do 


40 


do 


ISO ; 


do 


20 


do 


80 


do 


ISO , 


do 


170' 


do 


260 


do 


400 1 


July 6, 


20 1 


do 


10 


do 


210 1 


do 


,2i» 


do 


90 


do 


10 


do 


60 • 


do 


40 1 


do 


M) 1 


do 


20 ; 


July P, 


^i ! 


do 


2^.0 


do 


30 ■ 


do 


8*1 


do 


60 


do 


40 


do 


10 , 


do 


20 \ 


do 


00 ; 


do 


110 • 


do 


170 : 


do 


40 < 


do 


60 


do 


50 ' 


do 


20 1 


do 


60 


July 9, 


80 


do 


10 


do 


20 


do 


80 : 


do 


10 . 


do 


30 ! 


do 


30 


do 


154 


do 


90 


do 


50 


do 


272 


do 


150 


do 


50 


do 



.......... 


•••*! 


1 , 


1 




1 


\"" 


1 * * 


, 


















1 






1 






1.... 


:;:;:::: I 


1 { 






1* ••• 












1 







. ^ 








1 


J....;.... 


.... 60 


i;:::):::: 




r ! • 




|....i ; 


' ...' ' 


!.....'. 


■....' . .'. . 


, ^ — I ^ 






I....'!'*.* 




1...., : 


1 


1. 1 




1.. 





, 




'••' : 1 


, 












1 












1.... 




1 




......... .... ..,...j 



80 



100 

400 

240 

192 

100 

10 

400 

40 

4") 

200 

» 
9P 

1«0 
16 
70 
60 

66» 
lU 
40 

120 
SO 
90 
t9 

170 

260 

400 
80 
16 

SIC 
90 
20 
10 
60 
40 
10 
20 

sao 

800 

30 
80 
60 
40 
10 
90 
90 
160 
ITtt 
40 
00 
50 
90 

80 
10 
20 
PO 
10 
30 
W 

154 
90 
SO 

879 

190 
90 



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133 



Amount of Interest paid by Alien Mat/^ Agent of Stale of Indiana^ to 
the holders of Indiana Five Per Cejit. Stale Stocky from the 4th day 
of February, 1550, to the 1st day of December, 1850. — CoTitinued. 



Stockholder a* JVaM««. 



5S 



Wk9M Paid. 



jf»*t •/ Intereot wkn im*. 






4,300 

10,0.0 

6,000 

5,000 

4,500 

500 

S/)0> 

5t0 

500 

1,500 

«,10U 

J,0L0 

S,50'i 

5,' 00 

i,o;w 

1,000 

1S,500 

SOO 

5,000 
S,000 

50<l 
1,SS0 

800 
9,000 
S,000 
3.0(0 
1.000 
3,000 
1,000 
S,000 
1,500 
1,00«) 
3,000 
4,000 
1.000 
5,000 
7,000 
8,500 

5.one 

4,500 

4.500 

5'0 

1,500 

3,000 

1,000 

1.O0O 

fiOO 

S,000 

10,0(0 

3,000 

10,000 

3.00f) 

500 

1^000 

37.000 

1,500 

500 

S4,S00 

17,0)0 

12,000 

500 

9,500 

5,000 

500 

1,000 



Alexander Henry 

AHSmlih 

Edwards Handy 

Do in Trust,. 

Geoi^e H Dunn 

Robert Bayard, (Trustee,). 

Scabury Brewster 

Ira C Voorhies 

Cornelius McLean 

A Grcpsbeck 

Herman J Fitie 

Joseph Cudlipp 

Thomas Harbine 



George Oeden. 

Jesse Godley 

FloydT Ferris 

Anne Phelps 

Rev. D Short 

Peter Harmony 

S De Maredo 

Francis H Challion 

John H Browning 

John E Cowlcs 

William Birt y 

Sarah McManus 

Catharine La Towotle 

Mary Bciinet 

John White 

Thomas L Smith 

ATHale 

Eliia A Thayer 

Robert and Williams 

Hinkley and Company 

William P Pettei 

Joseph KT Marshficld, 

Mary Hallam 

Jean Louis BInet , 

Aoguate C T Vernes 

Christian D Emsen 

Thomas Black and Company. 

Isaac Merrett, (Trustee) 

HughC Smith 

Isabella K Smith 

Samuel Bespham 

James W Miller '. 

Luther Eltinq , 

Abraham Elting 

SamuelB Bates , 

WSHaliblrd , 

Sarah S Beecher , 

Ebenezer Buckingham 

Samuel Starkweather 

Kdmund Tweedy 

Jesse L Williams , 

Hugh Hartshorne 

William Greaves 

Daniel B Ryall 

Henry Mandevillo 

William Moore 

Charles Bird 

George W Norton 

Jonathan Sturges 

Francis Lieber 

William Buckingham 

Edward Prime 

Harrison Durkee 

Charlotte Smith 



go 

100 
SOO 
200 
120 
100 

90 

10 

40 

IM 

10 

30 

42 

20 

SO 
HO 

40 

20 

250 

4 

100 

40 

1" 

25 

18 

40 

40 

60 

SO 

60 

30 

40 

30 

20 I 

60 ; 

80 

20 I 
100 I 
140 i 

50 I 

loo ' 

90 

90 

40 ; 

30 

60 

20 

90 

10 

40 
200 ■ 

60 
SOO 

6.) 

10 

20 
740 

30 

10 
484 
340 
240 

10 

50 
100 

10 



1850. 
July 9. 
July 10, 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
July 11. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
July 12, 

do 

do 
July 13, 

do 

do 

do 
July 15, 

do 

do 

do 
July 16, 

do 

do 
July 17, 

do 

do 

do 
July 18, 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
July !9, 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
July 22, 

do 

do 
July 23, 
July 24, 

do 
July 25, 
July SS7, 
July 30, 

do 

do 

do 
July 31, 

August Ir 

do 
do 



'!. ..!* 



9U I 



•| I 



'.'.VSio ioV'ii'l 



90 

IW 

SOO 

200 

190 

10" 

90 

10 

40 

10 

•0 

» 

49 

SO 

SO 

100 

90 

SO 

4 
1» 
40 
10 
2S 
i£ 
4' 
40 

so 

00 

so 

40 

» 
99 
00 

80 

SO 

100 

140 

SO 

100 

00 

90 

10 

30 

60 

50 

SO 

10 

40 

SO 

60 

SOO 

£0 

10 

SO 

740 

10 
484 
340 
240 
10 
50 
100 
10 
SO 



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133 

ount of Interest paid by AlUn May^ Agent of State of Indiana, to 
he holders of Indiana Five per cent. State Stock, from the 4th day 
f February, 1850, /o the 1st day of Dt.ernber, 1850. — Continued. 



SUekkoUtra' J^ames. 



'^^ 



i I" 



jSM*t of Interest when due. 



When Paid. 




►no 

m I 

i;.0 ' 
)10 , 
>iO i 

.00 

) I 

>H) I 
>4.0 

»'>0 I 

sou I 

OJ 

\Q0 I 

>KI 
)-0 

>»0 
I 
'>00 
O'J 
50J 
■C) 
> 
»K) 
53 » 
>')0 
fKW 
5.0 
(») 
5<» 
5MJ 
iin«i 
OOD 

5CH) 

sot) 

•VK) 
500 
5),) 
RK) 
H^.O ' 
O.J' I ' 
5 
■Oil 
5'M , 
000 
00.1 ' 
5)fi 

OX) • 
5)0 

IHO ' 

,500 I 

,750 ! 

S-JO 1 
,030 



D H Ncvins 

R H Nevina and Company 

Mrs Martha £ Dunham, 

Isaac Seyniore, 

Uaiiiel C Ambler, 

Truman Moss 

Joseph Moss, 

WDGookin, , 

Charles I'raske, 

Joshua Simmons, 

Samuel Brown, 

Marcuard and Co 

Daniel Kiasam, Jr., 

A BRioly 

VVm.and Jas. Courie 

Caleb Swan, 

John A^ate 

Ann HKclly, , 

John Wells, 

Albany, Commercial Bank of, ... 

Albany Savings Bank 

John Cbapplesmith,.. 

John Cbapplesmith 

Cecilia Cook, of Ind , , 

W W Corcoran 

Sarah Ann Higgius, 

Jana Robert, 

Daniel Robert, 

Arthur V Conuver, 

Hugh Barclay, 

John C Baldwin 

Miss Hester Giles, 

Charles V Chamberlain, 

George Mcl>ouald 

Frederick Gebbard, 

Uriel Crocker, , 

William E Smith, 

Calvin P Puller , 

Charles Struver, 

HoHea Webster, 

William Beers, 

Lyman Allen, , 

John W Nevins, 

JohnC Smith, 

Curtis Gilbert, President, , 

Gen. Joseph Totteo, 

DHMahau 

WS Robert, 

William A Sanford, 

Isaac Davis, 

William Woodard, 

John Ellis, 

Alexander Seiccnette, 

Henry STroxell, 

Nathan P Wells 

RHMcCurdy, 

Levi Woodbury, 

Lestock, Poach, Wilson and Robert 
Anderson 



12 

su 

lU 
80 

20 

soo 

tJO 

20 

10 

40 

10 ' 
SJO , 
120 • 

10 

2-1 I 

20 j 

30 I 

60 

50 
5S0 

70 

60 

no 

40 

10 

20 

20 

2» 

2J 
430 
160 

10 

10 

20 
180 
12i» 
390 

IM) 

10 

50 

20 

56 
216 

40 

70 

80 

10 

20 

20 

5'> 

20 
100 

50 

40 
100 

55 

10 



1830. 
August 2, 
August 2, 
August 2, 
AugUfft 2, 
August 5, 
Aueust 5, 
A ugust 5, 
August 5, 
August 6, 
August 7, 
August 7, 
August 9, 
August 13, 
August 12, 
August 14, 
August 14, 
August 15, 
August 13, 
August 15, 
August 16, 
August 16, 
August 16, 
August 16, 
August 16, 
August 16, 
August Id, 
August 20, 
August 2 ', 
August 20, 
August 22, 
August 22, 
August 24, 
August 24, 
August 26, 
August 27, 
August 27, 
August 27, 
August 27, 
Scpt'r 5, 
Sept'r 17, , 

Sept'r2*l, |.-.-! lO 

Sept'r 20, , 
Sept'r 23, j 
October 5, ; 
October 7, 1 
October 10, ' 
October 21,' 
October 16, 
October 18, 
Nov. 7, I 
Nov. 18, I 
Nov. 19, 
Nov. 19, 
Nov. 21, 
Nov. 23, 
Nov. 25, 
Nov. 27, 



•I' 



10 



160 July, 1, 



102,503 1 



20 ; 
59 



430 

160 
JO 
10 
20 
60 
60 

130 
90 
10 
;i0 
10 
56 

216 
40 
70 
80 
10 
20 
20 
50 
10 

HO 
50 
90 
50 
55 
10 

160 



10 ; 40 1700 [5,756, 95,996 



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134 



AccoujU of iniertd due the holders of Indiana 5 per cent, itoci, 
December Isty 1850. 



Jtm*t •/ 8t0ck, 



#3,500 



1 JULY DIVIDEND, IM7. 
Phelps, Dodge & Co., 



r« 



9 JANUARY DIVIDEND, 1848. 

500 David B«Dk^ : I 

500 Win. E. Culver I 

2,500 ICary P. Macdonnell and A. and Geo. and John McKencie, 

5,500 Phelps, Dodge di Co., 



90 



3 JULY DIVIDEND, 1848. 



500 

500 

500 

f,500 

S,500 



500 
500 



500 

S,500 
8,500 

500 



500 

500 
1.500 

500 
1,080 
S,500 
3,000 
3,500 
4,000 



500 

500 
1,500 

500 
1,000 

500 
1,000 
9,500 



David Banks, 

Wm. £. Calver, 

J. D. dc C.Jones, 

Mary P. Macdonnell and A. and Geo. and John HcKnnue,. 
Phelps, Dodge dt Co., 



4 JANUARY DIVIDEND, 1840. 

David Banks, 

Wm.E. Culver, 

Wra. dc James Gasqnet, 

J. D. dt C. Jones. 

Mary P. Macdonnell and A. and Goo. and John McKensie, 

Phelp«, Dodi^edc Co., 

Mr8,K. Viall, ! 



5 JULY DIVIDEND, 184B. 

David Banki, [ 

Wm.E. Culver, 

Wm. Greaves, i 

John Kean, ! 

A. C. Kingsland, 

Mary P. Macdonnell and A . and Geo. and John McKenzie, 

Olivia M. North, ; 

Phelps, Dodge dc Co., | 

Rev. Arthur Price, 



6 JANUARY DIVIDEND, 1650. 

David Banki, 

Wm.E. Culver, 

John 8. DeGraff, 

Nathan H.Hall 1 

Kenlin Hope, 

J. D. & C.Jones, 

A r. Kingsland, 

Mary P. Macdonnell and A. and Geo. and John Mckensie.. 



10 
10 
10 

» 

TO 
|1» 



10 
10 

80 
10 

so 

70 
19 



10 
10 
90 
ii» 
9) 
» 
ft 

9 

$5 



10 

1ft 

30 



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133 



Account of interest due the holders of Indiana 5 per cent, stockj 
December Ist^ 1850 — Continued. 



jtm^t of m9ck. 



•3.500 

S0,000 

500 



SOO 
1,000 

SOO 

10,000 

3,000 

1,500 

500 
1,500 

500 
7,000 
3,500 
1,000 

500 
1,000 
5,000 
1,000 

500 
10,000 
2,500 
3,000 
1,800 
3,500 
0,000 
90,000 
1,000 



Phelpi, Dodge 6t Co.,. 

Lyno Starling, 

C.ifcE.W. ghvring,. 



JULY DIVIDErtD, 1850. 

David Banks, 

P. J. Carrlngton, 

Wm. E. Culver, 

Robert Colgate, 

Jules DcLastyne, 

John J. DeGraflT, 

Thomas E. Davis 

E. Farrington, - 

ElUabeth Pish, 

Grumman Lock wood, 

Miss Selina Hendricks, 

George T. Hope, 

Nathan K.Hall 

Charles Judson, 

Robert Kelly « 

A. C. Kinesland, 

Wm. H. King, 

8kinner Langton, 

Mary P. Macdonnell and A. and Greo. and John McKensie, 

Olivia M. North 

Wm. M.Nevins, 

Phelps, Dodge & Co., 

George S. Perry, 

Lyne Starling, 

Wm,H. Richards 



70 
40O 

10 



10 
90 
10* 



ao 

10 
30 
10 

140 
70 
90 
10 
90 

100 
90 
10 

90O 
50 
80 
94 
71> 

190 



•1,714 



AMOUNT 



Jaly dividend, 1847 

JsJiaary dividend, 184B,. 

July dividend, 1848, 

January dividend, 1849,. 

Jaly dividend, 1840, 

J&naary dividend, 1850,. 
Jaly dividend, 1850, 



•71^ 
140 
150 
940 
330 
040 
1,714 

•3"^ 



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136 



Amounl of Expenses of the Indiana Agency^ including Sala^^y of 
Affent, Stationery and Postage, front the 9th day of January^ 
1850, to the 1st day of December, '1850. 



J 
8 

£ 



T« Whom fid. 



I On what Jtc€»nnt. 

i 



jfntMinC. 



irur (imarttr. 



I 



1 ; Post Maater,... 

« Allen May, 

3 I Wm. W. Ho»c». 

4 ; Boll & Gould,.. 

5 Wm. W. Ro»e,. 
« I Pon Master,... 

7 I Po»t Matter,... 

8 ; Alleu May 

9 Bell 4c Gould,. . 
10 ! Post Master,... 

n ' EditofK 

19 ; Post Master,... 

13 A.May, 

14 I Belldc GoqM... 



I Postaee, . . 

! Salary 

I Stalionery, 
I Stationery, 
j Stationery, 
I Box Kent,. 
I Postage, . . 

Salary 

I Stationery, 
• Box Kent, 
[ Printing, . 
i Postai;e, . . 
' Salary, . . . 

SUtlonery, 



$95 19 

809 93 

500 

54 40 

1.5 

S 00 

17 88 

CSS 00 

34 83 

S 00 

S SO 

43 27 

801 83 

38 80 

SS,4«8S9 



1st ^Barter tram 
the ninth day cf 
January to the 3ck 
day of May. 



Sndqnarterfrom 
the 4th day of Ha? 
to the 5th day oS 
Augnst. 

3d qnarterfrom 
the 4th day of Aa- 
ig;usttQthe5thdar 
of December. 



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Doc. No. 3.] [Part II. 

ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE TRUSTEES OP THE 



WABASH AND ERIE CAIAL. 



TO THE 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



OF THE 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



DECEMBER. 1850. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 
J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PBINTBB. 

1851. 
2D16 



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REPORT. 



Tothe General AMiembbf of the State ef Indiana : 

The Board of Truatees of the Wabash and Erie Canal, have 
tile honor of again submitting a Report of their proceedings, sinoe 
the last communication to the General Assembly, at the opmiing of 
the session of 1849. 

Id the opening paragraph of diat Report, it was the unpleasant 
duty of the Board to announce the death of Col. Thomas M. Blake, 
ose of the Trustees on the part of the subscribers to the adTaooe to 
complete the CanaL The vacancy thus occasioned, remained unfill* 
ed, UQtil the tenth of April, 1850 ; when, after legal notice, and the 
publications required by the law, an election was held by the sub* 
Kribing bondholdMS and their proxies, in the City of New Yoirk. 
Thomas Dowling, a resident citioen of Indiana, was elected to fill 
the vaoaney thus created ; and, at the same time, Charles Butler, a 
citizen of the United States, and a resident of New York, and Thorn* 
as Dowling, a resident citiaen of Indiana, were elected Trustees, to 
lerve for tne term of three years from the tenth day of May, 1850 ; 
and the proof required bv the law, of these elections, was transmit- 
t«d to the Governor of the State. 

The Canal was opened for business between the State line and La- 
fayette, on the eighteenth day of March last,4UMl south of that poi»t 
on the first of April. It was closed on the eighth of December, in- 
stant^ having been open for navigation, 261 days. 

The Trustees have the satisfaction of stating that no inlemiptioa 
to the navigatiooy worthy of note, occurred l&lween the State line 
aud Coal Creek, (189 miJ!as,) between the opening in March, and the 
twenty-first of November. The bu^est breach, during this period, 
was in the month of October, near JLsiayeUe, which stopped navi- 

Eation less than two days, and was repaired at a cost of about two 
imdred dollars. 

Between Coal Creek and Tenre Haute, several lai^ bveaches oc- 
curred during the early part of the season; which mav be referredt 
not only to the filling of this new portion of line with water, but. 



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140 

also, to the peculiar character of this Division, in respect to the soil 
and location. 

Between Terre Haute and Point Commerce, no breach occurred, 
though the water has so recently been let in, and the banks hare 
hardly settled 

The Chief Engineer justly remarks : ^'Considering the great length 
^of navigable line, the variety of mechanical structures, and the ex- 
^'posed situation of many parts of the Canal, there is ground for 
'^congratulation upon the exemption froan breaches during the past 
"season.*' 

By reference to the statements accompanying the Report of the 
Chief Engineer, it will be seen, that the outlay for repairs, during the 
past year, has been considerably less than in former years. Taking 
the average cost per mile of the repair service, during the last three 
years, on this canal, it is believed that it will be found to have been 
less per mile than on any similar canal in the countiy. 

The revenue of the canal for the year closing the £r8t day of No- 
vember, amount to $157,158 38; showing a gain of #38,499 3S 
over the revenues of the previous year. 

It will be seen, by reference to the table of tolls, collected at the 
several offices on the line, that the largest amount of toils was re- 
OMved at the Fort Wayne oltice ; ond that the increase at this office 
alone, was nearly thirteen thousand five hundred dollars over the 
amount collected the pravious year, and exceeds, by a much iaiger 
sum, any amount ever before collected at that office. As iJie tolls 
oH all merchandize imported into the Wabadh valley, by the canal, 
atecdllectad at this office, this increase is the inore gratifying, as it 
ilhows the effect of the extension of the eanal south. Merchandise 
purchased in the city of New York, was transported to Terre ifciute 
by the canal, this fiill, in soma instances, in twenty*two days. The 
contract time has been twenty-six days, and, with a good navigation, 
it will donbtless be reduced to an average of twenty-four da3r8, and 
possibly less, as the facilities of the northern ro<ttte are improved. 
The cheapness of thb route, and the greater degree of certainty be* 
longing to it, than appertains to the river, will, beyond a question, 
itMider it the preferred mode of eonneetion With the eastern Atlantic 
cities, both for exports and imports. 

But a small sum was dolleoted at the office in Terre Hautt, iadi- 
eating the small amount of boBiness for the season accruing on the 
kiWer division of the canal. The reasons fot this arelully explained 
ifi the report of the Chief Engineer, to wkioh attention is invited. 
The Trustees, however, anticipate a good nav^tion m the Spring, 
(when the supplies of water will be full) on the entire Kae, froai 
Feint Commferoe to the State line. A veiy small portion of the hst 
wheat crop has been sent to market, during the season just dosedi 
owing to the low prices which have raled in the eastern marketti for 
tiiat artwle, and, also, to the deficiency of water through the whole 
Ume, south of t^liat Greek, as stated ia this report It may he txfee^ 



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141 

«d llmt the surfAits^emaining in the cof>ti(ry i«^llHfe'4i«wn'^l on 
the opening of nAtiicatKM), and furnish a good busifieitffoi* th^btt^tia!. 

The extent to which the products of the Wabash valley are trans- 
ported to market, by means of the canal, as exhibited in the repd^t 
of the Chief Engineer, andihe tables hereto appended furnishes gi*at- 
ifying eridence of the increasing valoe of this work, to the State of 
Indiana, and justifies the expectation rhat, when the capacity of the 
Doil shall have been fully developed, by settlement and improvement, 
the canal will be largely taxed to carry off its surplus, arid will real- 
ise, it is to be hoped, the calculations of income which have been 
predicated on it. 

A statement is appended,- showing the annual receipts of tolls,' and 
the net revenue accmingfrom the canal, since the commencement of 
the Trust. 

During the pest season, the canal between Flint Greek, (ten miles 
above Attica,) and Terre Haute, has suffered greatly frdm a deficien- 
cy of water to supply the wants of navigation. The difficulties aris- 
ing from this cause, heretofore reported, have been aggravated dur- 
ing the past season, by the remarkable drouth, commencing about 
the first of May, continuing during that month, and ending Only 
with the late fall rains. All the efierts of the Superintendents seem- 
ed unavailing to give sufficient water; and freight boats, to and 
from Terre Haute, were unable to take out but partial loikis. The 
Coat Creek Level had to contend with another formidable obsfacle. 
We allude to the waste of water at the Permville Side Cut,refen'6d 
to in the report of the Chief Engineer. It is ascertained that the 
waste of wafer at this side cut, has been greater than the quantity Of 
water supplied by Coal Creek, one of the principal feedei*s on this 
portion of the canal. It is greatly to be regretted that any diver- 
sion of the water from the canal was ever permitted by the Legisla- 
ture, even at a point so favorable as Perrysville ; and that so much 
was risked in the construction of such works. It certainly nev^r 
could have been contemplated that the main lin^ of the' canal, m 
which the State had so deep an interest, should be impaired in ' hs 
usefulness by any local or suboiKiinate work. 

All the experience and observation of the Trustees on this subject, 
have confirmed them in the views they have heretofore expresMl, 
and the positions they were constrained to take in respect to tHe 
tide-cut connectioiM. 

The canal had just been finished to Coal Credt by the State, whtfn 
it was transferred to the Trustees ; but the eupply of water for navi* 
gatkm, on the levels betw^n Lafayette and Coal Creek, haxi n6t 
been tested. The Perrysville side cut had also been constructed pt^* 
vious to the transfer, and about the time the canal was finished to 
Covington ; and the influence it was to bav^, in diminishing the sup- 
fly for the canal below, was equally unascertained. 

The Trustees have had to contend with these difficulties from 1Kb 
beginning, as they have been careful to state in their annual reports 
to the General Assembly 



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The hmi txertioiii of tbe Tr«i9le«!, duriog the pMt four ieasoos <^ 
na^gation, have not availed to furnish to the ca&aU below FUnt 
Creeftt from the leeders provided bv the State* a supfriy of water ad- 
equate to the -wants of the canal alone, and have proved, beyond all 
controversy, the utter impossibility of furnishing water for any side 
cuts above Coal Creek, and the Trustees have no power to change 
the location, or to enlarge the capacity of the canal, as constructed 
and finished by the State, nor to divert or appropriate any of the 
means of the Trust, for any such purpose. 

In this connection, it b proper to state to the L^islature, that, at 
the session of this Board, held in June, last, a communication wu 
received, apprising them that a company had been oiiganized by the 
qiticens of Williarasport, for the purpose of constructing a side cat 
to connect with the canal opposite to that place ; a copy ot which 
communication, signed by the Secretary of the company, is hereto 
appended, dated 25th May, 1850, together with the answer of the 
Resident Trustee, under the order of the Board. The Trustees re- 
gret to say that, notwithstanding the notice given to the parties in 
the letter of the Resident Trustee, and which they hoped would pre* 
venl a proceeding so injudicious and improvident, in expectation of 
deriving a supply of water from the canal, they have entered upon 
the c<Mistruction of the work, and are prosecuting it, with the inten- 
tion, as avowed, of intersecting the canal. 

In view of this proceeding, which threatens to abstract from the 
main line of the canal, the water necessary to maintain an uninter- 
rupted navigation, and to frustrate the designs of the State and Gen- 
eral Governments, the Trustees will feel bound to interpose every 
legal right to prevent a proceeding so injurious and fatal. The par- 
ties threatening to make such breach in this case, however, profess 
to have some right to connect with the canal under some charier or 
authority granted to them by an act of the Legislature, but the 
Trustees cannot conceive it possible that the Legislature has, by any 
express or implied grant to a private company, imparted to them the 
right to injure or ruin its greatest public work. It is a subject 
which demands the most serious consideration of the Legislature. 

The Trustees have no hesitation in saying that, if they have not 
the power, under the acts of the General Assembly creating ttie 
Trust, to prevent such breach of the canal and diversion of iti 
water, that the line of the canal south of the side cut, which is near 
Attica, as far down as Terre Haute, will be rendered almost entirely 
useless to the public, during a period of one third or more, (and that 
too the most important portion) of the season of navigation, for 
want of water. 

It was in consequence of this scarcity of water, and the impossi* 
bility of supplying it, that the Trustees refused to construct tbe 
Williamsport and Independence side cuts, concerning which they 
have heretofore fully reported to the Legislature. 



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143 

It will be remembered that a suit in chancery was insthuted in 
he Montgomery Circuit Court, at tlie instance of the citizens of 
Viliiamsport and Independeuce, against the Trustees, by virtue of 
I Joint Resolution of the Legislature, passed in the session of 
848-9, to compel the Trustees to construct the side cuts in ques* 
ion. 

The answer of the Trustees was promptly filed, and proofs have 
een taken, and the cause is yet pending in that court and awaiting 
he final hearing and decision of the court. 

The Trustees, in the conviction of the propriety of their positions, 
vere restrained from taking any exception to such action of the 
!iegislature, though it exhibits the singular spectacle of the State 
ndeavoring to enforce, through the agency of her own courts, the 
icing of an act by the Trustees, which, if done, would ruin the 
lanal for any useful purpose, and thus inflict an irreparable injury 
ipon the State, and defeat one of the main objects which she aimed 
attain by the acts creating the Trust, and for which so lai^ an 
lutlay has been made by the State and General Governments; 
iamely, that of making a navigable canal between the Lakes 
md the Ohio River. Further, the Trustees were influenced to ac- 
[uiesce in it by the consideration, that an opportunity would thus be 
ifibrded them to establish, by unquestionable proofs, in a judicial 
iroceeding, the truthfulness of the facts on which they relied for their 
ustification ; and this being established to the satisfaction of the 
lourt, if the court should then decide, that, notwitstanding by the 
erms of the acts they were still bound to construct the said side 
:ats, without any r^ard to the eflbct upon the canal to be produced 
ly such construction, they were advised that a case would then bo 
>resented in wiiich, to prevent an injury aflecting so vitally the in- 
erests equally of the State and her creditors, it would be the duty 
f the Legislature, under the pledge embodied in the act, that, ** the 
' State shall and will supply by future legislation all such defects, (if 
any) found to exist, as shall enable the Trustees aforesaid to carry 
into full eflect the fair and obvious intent of the act,'* to relieve the 
Trust from any such fatal necessity. 

The Trustees do not doubt that, when they shall present a casei 
Ailing for such further legislation, to protect the vital interests of 
he Trust, the Legislature will, in good faith, pass the requisite laws 
or that purpose. 

In their last annual report the Trustees referred to some efforts 
hey had made, jointly with the Canal Boards of Ohio and Illinois, 
vith a view to impress upon the Canal Board of New York the 
peculiar relations of those western canals with their great work, and 
he importance and necessity of lessening the burdens upon the pro- 
luce of these western vallies, in passing from the Lakes to tide*water* 
n that connection, they reported an important reduction previously 
(lade upon corn, dec., amounting to 33i per cent., expressing, at the 
ame time, strcmg hopes of a reduction, on other leading articles^ 



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eDoa&a ting from liberal and just views of the vulue lo New Y^rkof 
the .western trade. These expectatious were not wholly disap- 
pointed. Prior to the opening of navigation, last spriogt a reductieo 
was made on the charge upon Pork and other western produce po3»> 
ing through the Erie Canal; and the Trustees are grmtified io 
observing, in the enlarged views of the public authorities of that 
State, as well as from other causes operating in coi^junctioa there- 
with, a tendency towards diminished charges, both in tolls and 
' freights. 

Feeling a strong desire, also, to lighten the charges on the Wabt^ 
and Erie Canal, as much as could be done consistently with the 
maintenance of the work, and the liabilities under which it is placed, 
having regard to the comparatively limited trade thereon, the Presi- 
dent of the Board was authorized to unite with the Canal Board of 
Ohio in a general revision of the tolls. A joint meeting for thb pur- 
pose was held at Toledo in the month of June last; and, after free 
and full investigation, having before them a statement of the etkiin 
shipments of produce by the canal and river, and the cost by each 
route, and with the further advantage of a free conference with 
intelligent gentleman, residing at that place and at various pointioi 
the Wabash, engaged in the purchase and shipment of produce,! 
joint toll-sheet was finally agreed upon, making lai'ge reductions upea 
many leading . articles. These changes, while they will not I^ka 
materially, it at all, the revenue from the work, will tend ultimalelj 
to concentrate and establish the trade upon the canal. The redoo 
tion made upon both the New York Canal, and tha- Wabesk 
and Erie Canal, on Pork, and other like articles, is equal to one dol- 
lar per ton from Lafayette, and near two dollars from Terre.Haote* 
The Legislature is aware that the adjustment of tolls on the through 
trade, constituting the chief business on the canal, must ever form a 
subject for joint action of the two States of Indianaand Ohio, neither 
State having control of the entire work. 

In regard to the water-power created by the canal, the Troslaei 
have. pursued the same policy indicated by the pi'evious action of the 
State authorities, granting leases for its lAse as the. wants, of tfae 
country have seemed to demand, and as the use of the watw-ppwer 
has seemed compatible with the higlier interests and conveaience of 
navigation. There are now in operation on the whole line of canal, 
nine flouring mills, operating 22 run of 4i feet mill-stones; eight saw- 
mills, running ten saws; three paper-mills, eight cai'ding aadfuUiDg 
mills, two oil mills, and one iron bloomery and forgei 'Tm Board* at 
its present session, has authorized the leasing, soon after the openiflg 
of navigation next spring, of the power at the Locks at Attics* 
Covington, and Kossuth ; and also a portion of the water power at 
Newbury Dam, if, in the mean time^ the title to the ground can be 
perfected. At the last named point, and at the several locks between 
this dam and Maysville, in Daviess County, there will be a laiger 
amount of water power than on any other portion of the cara, 



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tlw impvovsmeiit of vrhioh will tend to develppe tbo re^oiirces ond 
advaace the wealth of tbi^ portk>n of the State. It is in this light, 
chiefly, that the leasing of water-power on Any portion of the caaal 
is sanctioned. As a source of direct reveQU?,*it is of but little con- 
sequence. 

In all leases of water-power, the preference rightly due to the 
convenience of navigation has been fully secured, and the roilU are 
not suffered to run when the water is needed for navigation. At 
certain points where there is a surplus beyond the capacity of the 
canal to convey, as at Pittsburgh* Lnruyette, and other placesi the 
use of such surplus is permitted. The upper saw-inill at the last 
named place,, having been stopped by order of the Superintendent 
(or so much of the time during the last three seasons, as, in the 
opinion of the Board, to destroy the value of tbe privilege, this lease 
has been extinguished, as provided thereint and compensation made 
for the value of the improvement. 



Lh\£ OF CANAL UNDER COIlSTRUCTiON. 



At the date of the last repert, it was announi^ed that the DtviaioA 
of canal from Lodi to Terra Haute (37 miles) bad been compleledt 
and that boats arrived at the latter plaoe on the 25th October, 1849. 
In making this commnnication it is gratifying to be able to say. that 
tbe Eti Kiver JHviswnf from Torre Haute to Point Con^merce 4^pd 
Worthington, a distanoe of 42 miles, was filled with water 09 the 
fiiat of -Junet 185U, and, on the seventh of the sam^ month, tfie 
first boot from tbe noEth reached Point Commerce and WorthL^gtOP* 
By this it will be seen thalt since June, 1847, there has been addfd 
to the navigaUe line of canal 79 tnil^, the total cost of consfruc- 
iien amomting to tS56t4d9 39. On th9se79 miles, the aqtual w 
penditure has exceeded the estimate of the Engineen i33,00Q,.9r 
about &i per oent When it is considered that much of this excess 
• waa.ooeosionod by the winter floods of 1848 and 1849, and the.r<B* 
ooostruction of work injiured thereby, the approximation of thof^ 
estimates to^tbo: actual cost must be coasidored as highly ^atisroctoiy. 
The completion of tbo Eel River Division^ n^w onnouncedt gives to 
tlio^ Slate of indiona a oontiauous canal of 268 miles, and, ^addins 
tko 84 miles beloaglAg ^ 0|iio» makes a continuous line of ^V 
Ao onSie dismneo boifvden Toledo nt^ Point. Qm* 



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146 

The line between Point Commerce and Evansville, (II li miled,) 
has been let in four several divisions, consecutively, at different 
' periods. These divisions are: 

1st. The Newbury Division, from Point Commerce 

to Newbury, 17 miles. 

Al. The Maysville Division, from Newbury to 

Maysville, •' •' • • • 23i miles. 

3d. The Petersburg Division, from Maysville to 

Petersburgh, 16| rnilei 

4th. The Evansville Division, from Petersburgh to 

Uvansville, 54J miles. 

' All these divisions had been let previous to the last report of the 
Trustees, except the Evansville Division, which was let on the sixth 
'day of September last, and is to be finished, by the terms of the 
' contract, by the first day of November, 1859. 

The length of line now under work is IIH miles, and the effective 
force employed during the season has been equal to about 2,000 men. 
This force has been employed chiefly on the three upper divisions, 
the last division having been so recently let. 

The Newbury Division is in such a state of forwardness as to give 
assurance that water may foe passed down this portion of the canal, 
to the crossing of White River, at the opening of navigation in the 
spring. Every eflbrt is making to secure this result, so desirable on 
-every account. The amount which has been paid on this division 
• for construction, is $192,435 01 ; and it is estimated that $35,- 
449 99 will be required to complete it. 

The Maysville Division has hsen prosecuted quite as fa.st as couM 

' have been expected, considering the sickness which prevailed by the 

spread of cholera. This Division might have been open tor naviga- 

' lion early in the ensuing spring, if the dam at thecroesnig of White 

River, at Newbury, which is to furnish the supply of water, had 

' been finished, as expected, in accordance with the contract. 

The amount pnid on this Division, op to the 23th of Novem- 
ber hst, was 095,560 80; and the estimated amoant vet to be paid 
^%i ^i^iiM 40. 

** The payments on the Peiersbut^ Division have been large, «wiag 
to the heavy character of the work. The payments annoQiit to 
9170.048 05: leaving yet to he paid f 177,U5 ST. This DivisieB 
has beet) prosecuted with energy on the part of a majority of the 
contractors, ainl the work is in a forward stale. 

With the exception of the prevalence at' cholera, which agiain 
visited the line during the montlw of May, June, and July, the sea- 
ton has been remaitably favorable ibr'work Millie caaaL We 
regret to say that the epidemic proved quite fatal, and that ateot 
150 of the laborers fell victims to it The terror produced by tiiis 
disease scattered the forces on the line, suspending most of the sec- 
tions under contra<:t, and retarding the work very seriously. Sudb 
was the alarm createtU that many of the contract(»rs found it ii&* 



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cult to re-organize any considerable force until late in the Tall The 
report of the Resident Engineer, herewith submitted, will more fully 
explain the nature of the delays caused, not only by this great an^ 
fatal epidemic, but also by other causes. In that report will be 
found a detailed statement of the work on the line under construc- 
tion, and the present condition of each of the several divisions, 
to which the attention of the General Assembly is invited. 

The attention of the Trustees having been called to the Lock con- 
nected with the Dam on the West Fork of White Ki^er, which was 
designed to be made so as to accommodate fully the usual naviga- 
tion of the river in Flat Boats, after conferring with a delegation, 
in behalf of the dthsens of that section, interested in the navigation 
of the river, it was determined to enlarge the size of the Lock so as 
to admit of the passage of a boat one hundred and five feet in 
length and twenty-one feet and a half in width, which was satis- 
factory to the gentlemen referred to. 

It has been stated that, by the terms of the contract for the con- 
struction of the Evans vide Division, the work is to be finished by the 
first day of November, 1858. 

The contractors for this important Division of the canal, are 
Samuel Porrer, Solomon Sturges, and 8. R. Hosmer, of the State of 
Oliio, all of them well known as gentlemen of unquestioned respon- 
' sibility, experience, and energy. 

Preparatory to this letting, the Division was carefully surveyed 
and located during the last season, by Mr. Ball, the Resident lingi- 
neer, and his report, herewith submited, exhibits fuUy the character 
of the line and the nature of the work. By reference to the report 
it wilt be seen^ that this is the most costly division of the Ganal. 
Prom the estimates of the Engineer it is believed, that the cost of 
this Division, at the contract prices, when finished, will not rarj' 
much from f5Sl,34t. 

The act to provide for the funded debt of the State of Indiana, 
and for the completion of the Wabash and Erie Canal to Evansville, 
and the act supplementary thereto, make it the duty of the Trustees 
to adopt and put in execution such plans and measures as they shall 
deem most expedient for the prosecution and completion of the 
canal to Evansville ; and it is also made their duty to apply the toils 
snd revenues of the canal, and the proceeds of the canal iiands ('sold 
and unsoM) after defraying all needful and proper expenditures for 
expenses, repairs and other causes, including the payment of the 
interest on the cash advance of the Bondholders for the completion 
of the canal,) *Mn payment of the work, labor, and materials, or 
contracts for the supply of work, labor or materials, to be done and 
furnished in and about the further prosecution and construction of 
the said canal and works, until the same shall have been fully tsotti- 

Iyleted to Byansvilie, as the moneys to be paid for the same ihall 
irom time to time become doe and payable.^ 
The only means prodded by the law, for the oomptalloii of llie 



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148 

canal to Evansville, and subject to the power or the Trustees for 
that purpose, are, the advaoce of $800,000, made by the snbscribiog 
bondholders, the proceeds of the canal Jands, and the tolls and reve- 
nues of the canal, after iii'st paying all expenses of the Trust, and 
repairs and expenses of the canal, and the interest on the advance 
as above specified. 

The Trustees have no power, in case of deficiency of means to 
finish the canal, to make any further requisitions upon the bond- 
kolders, (beyond the advance above named,) neither are the bond- 
holders required to make any such further advance. The Trustees 
calculated that their cash means* including the receipts for the year 
1851 from lands and tolls, would cover the contracts for caaal work 
as far south as the Petersburgh Division, inclusive; but would not 
justify them in making further contracts, on the usual terms of cash 
payment, for the Evansville Division. Under these circumstances, 
and to ensure the completion of the canal at the earliest practicable 
petiod, and within the time limited by the law, it became necessary, 
in the letting of the Evansville Division, to postpone the payments 
to the contractors to such times as that the accruing receipt from 
sales of land and tolls from the canal would supply the means to 
meet them. It is, therefore, stipulated in the contract, that the obli- 
gations of the Trustees, to be issued from time to time as the woik 
is done, to the contractors, shall be made payable in specified sums* 
on the first day^ of January in each of the years 1S53, 1854, 1855, 
and 1856, respectively. It is also stipulated that all the accruii^ 
means of the Trusteess, (after retaining enough to cover the cost of 
finishing the other portions of the work previously let, the interest 
«n the advance, and all repairs and expenses of every kind,) shall, as 
iiBuit as realized, be applied to the payment of such obligations, 
whether they be due or not. Interest is to be allowed on the esti- 
mates for work done, from the time they are made, (that is, eveiy 
sixty days) at the rate of six per cent., to be paid semi-annuaUy^ and 
a sum not exceeding three hundred and fifty thousand dollars is to 
be made payable in the city of New York, at the expense of the 
contractors, who are to pay the exchange; the remainder will be 
paid at the office of the Trustees at Terre Haute. The contracton 
wiU pay cash to laborers under them. 

Considering the ccmtingent and uncertain character of means on 
which the Trustees must rely, as provided in the a<^, they deemed 
it their duty to secure the longest credit for the payments to be made 
on the Evansville Division which they could, compatible with tbe 
interest of the Trust, and without enhancing the cost of the work 
materially above a cash standard* 

The circumstances of the country, and the easy condiUoa of the 

aaoney market at the time of the letting, and the uaquftstionaUe 

character of the security they bad toofier, favored this arrangemeni; 

ind it is believed that the increasing means of the Trust will not 

' only be i»f le to meet the payments, according to the pn>visioes (j( 



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148 

the coftimet, as they thatl fall due, hot the Trastees will expect to 
be able, from those means, to anticipate the payments. 

Thus the final completion, of the canal to fSvansviile, by the fall 
of 1853, Is provided for and placed beyond a doubu 

The period fixed in the contract, for the completion of the EmM^ 
ville Division, had regard to the heavy character of the work and 
the allowance which should be made for that; and also, to the time 
fixed by the hiw within which the Trusees were required to finish ft; 
making just allowance, as provided in the act, for delays and hin- 
drances which have occurred in the prosecution of the work from 
the time It was commenced in the fall of 1847, by re;i8on of provK 
deatial and other causes not within tlie control of the Trustees, and 
which have been from time to time stated and fully explained in the 
auQual reports of the Trustees to the General Assembly, and in th^ 
accompanying reports of the Chief and Resident Engineers. The 
Trustees have been careful to prosecute the work in accordance with 
the provisions of the acts in this respect, and so as to ensure its final 
completion within the specified time ; and this is considered as hai^ 
ing been attained by the contract now made for the completion of 
the Evansville Division. 

From the preceding statements respecting the canal work and the 
liabilities of the Trust for existing contracts, it will be seen that on 
the three upper divisions, viz: the Newbury, Maysville, and Peters- 
burg divisions, there has been paid, in the aggregate, the sum of 
$398,033 86, up to the first day of December, 1850;' and that the 
farther sum of (|»385,841 66, remained at that date, to be paid to 
the contractors, to finish these divisions according to the contract 
prices. If to this sum we add the amount to be paid to the contrac- 
tors for the Evansville Division, (being the probable cost of that 
Division under the contract) estimated at $561,341 59, (no part of 
which, however, fails due .till January, 1853) it gives a total of $847,- 
183 25 as the outstanding liabilities of the Trustees on the first day 
of December, (850, for canal work. This amount will be reduced 
by the payment of the December estimate in the sum of nearly 
seventy thousand dollars, leaving the amount at the close of the year 
of outstanding liabilities, under contracts for canal work, at about 
fm,18S 95. 

To this sum is to be added any sums to be paid for damages, for 
ri^ht of way, or other causes, during the period of construction, add 
which do not enter into contracts for the work. 

Having finished two important divisions of the canal, and nearly 
finished three other divisions, and having contracted for the work on 
the only remaining division, we are able now to approximate to the 
final cost of the entire work, when finished to Evansville, and to 
compare that with the estimates which were made of the probable 
^ost of the same work shortly previous to its commencement 

Prom the statements exhibited in the report of the Chief Bnnneer, 
itwill be seen, that the final cost is placed at f2»Ol2l,065 17; and 



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thtt, by Ihe eitimates of c<Mt which were made in 1845» by Messn. 
Pauntleroy and Ball* it was placed at $1,910»371. 

It is therefore probable that the final cost may exceed the estimates 
in the sum of nearly $1009000. When the magnitude of the work 
is considered, together with the great advance in the price of cook 
iBOA labor, as exhibited in the reports, within the last three years, 
dating from about the time the work was commenced, and the lai^e 
aniount added to the cost by reason of the damage to the work 
occasioned by the exti'aordinary floods of the winter of 1848, as ex- 
hibited in the last annual report, it is believed that so near an ap- 
proximation of the preliminary estimates to the actual results, has 
but few examples ; and it demonstrates the intelligence and accuracy 
with which the estimates were originally made* as well as the energy ^ 
fidelity, and economy with which the work has been prosecuted. 

It is proper to state, in this connection, that, in the estimates of 
final cost, and also in the original estimates, the payments for dam- 
ages done to property^ and for the right of way, have not been inclu- 
ded. 



CANAL LANDS- 

The Trustees have sold during the year ending 30th November, 
1850, of the lands lyine in the Vincennes District, 25,468,22 acres, 
for the sum of $52,9S3 76. This shows an increase of sales of 
2,564,08 acres, and $6,402 31 over the receipts for last year; and 
an examination of the returns exhibits the gratifying fact, that a 
much larger proportion of the sales, than heretofore, is made of 
lands lying south of White River — a portion of the State where few 
public improvements have been made, and which, notwithstanding 
its many natural advantages, has for many years attracted but little 
immigration. 

In ccmsequence of the many discrepancies constantly occunriog 
between the books of the Land Office at Washington and those of 
the Register at Vincennes, the Trustees procured a certified list from 
the General Land Ofiice, of all the tracts marked upon their books 
as Canal Lands, and in July last caused a comparison to be made at 
Vincennes, and the books of the Register and their own to be cor- 
rected conibrmably to this list. On this examination it was discov. 
ered that there was a balance of lands yet to be selected in this 
district, to make up the total quantity of half the lands remaining 
unsold at the date of the Act of Congress of 3d March, 1845, of 
6,598.76 acres ; which quantity the Trustees will proceed to have 
selected early in the year 1851. When these lands shall have been 
located, the grant, as originally made, will be for 796,672.48 acres; 
of which there has been sold by the Trustees 116,779.50 acres; 
leaving a balance of 679,892.58 acres, which, at the valuation plaoed 
upon th?m, are worth $l,3d2,051 62. 



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At the Land Ofice at Loganaport the total receipts, on account of 
ands west of Tippecanoe, for the year ending 30th November, have. 
>een $30,923 49; of which $21,675 15 has been received on ac-| 
:ount of new sales. The number of acres sold during this period is 
)3,985.32, most of which was sold on a credit. Since the first of 
October, the Trustees have directed that these lands shall be sold- 
exclusively for cash; and it is to be hoped that the next year will 
ihovf a considerable increase in the receipts from this source. Of. 
the amount received, as above stated, the sum of $4,885 was in scrip. 

On account of lands East of Tippecanoe, the receipts for the year 
lave been $31,900 17; of which was in scrip, of principal, $5,698 79, 
ind interest, $1311 44. 

Of the land east and west of Tippecanoe, including the new se* 
lections, there are now remaining unsold, 

Elasi of Tippecanoe, 2,562.05 acres, valued at $7,342 63 

West of Tippecanoe, 49,509.07 acres, valued at 89,032 25 

New selections, 93,486.90 acres, valued at 140,049 39 

Total $236,424 27 

The amount due on lands sold, East of 

Tippecanoe, most of which is to be 

paid by October, 1852, 0/ principal 

and interest, is $230,093 73 

Amount due on lands sold west of Tip- 

pecanocy including new selections,* * 90,460 97 

320,654 70 



Making the total value of lands, sold and unsold,- • • . $556,978 97, 
Value of lands unsold in the Vincennes District,* • • • 1>392/)51 62 



Total value of both Land Offices, $1,949,030 59 



Appended to this report are tabular statements, showing the re- 
ceipts for each month of the pa^t year at Washington, the number 
of acres of each class sold, and the amount of purchase money; 
also statements of the receipts east and west of Tippecanoe, on ac* 
count of sales, partial and final payments, interest and penalties. 

The Trustees have redeemed, of the scrip issued for lands east of 
Tippecanoe, since the commencement oi the Trust, the sum of 
$82,988 74; being considerably more than the amount reported in 
any of the statements heretofore rendered by the Auditor to the 
General Assembly or to the Ti*ustees ; and exceeding, by the sum of 
$2,751 56, the amount fixed upon as outstanding, at the settlement 
between the Auditor and the Resident Trustee, in May, ^1849, as 
authorized by a Joint Resolution of the General Assembly/ 

Appended to this report, the Trustees submit a statement relative 
to the scrip east and west of Tippecanoe, showing the amounts re* 



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deemed ap to the first of December, 18S0: When the amotmt of s«rip 
outstanding shall have been finally redeemed, the Tru^ees will ex- 
hibit a statement to the General Assembly, In view of an equitaUe 
adjustment of the account between the State and the Trust. 

Prom the preceeding statements it will be seen that the sales of 
knd, both at the Washington and Logansport offices, have been 
quite satisfactory ; and it is to be hoped that no diminution will oc- 
cur for the next year. The lands at the Washington office have been 
sold exclusively for cash, those entitled to pre-emptions having availed 
themselves of it during the period allowed by law. At the Logans- 

Sbrt office 24,658,39 acres were entered on a credit before the first 
ay of October, 1850, after which date cash sales only were allowed. 
Tlie large reduction made by the Trustees in the price of those lands 
in 1847, and the belief that all parties would be gainers by cash sales^ 
Induced the Board, at its June session, 1850, to direct that, after the 
first of October, no credit would be allowed on entries. Four 
months public notice was given of this rule of the Board, to aflTord 
all persons interested ample time to avail themselves of the credit 
system, if it should be their wish to do so. 

Many of the new lands selected for the State In 1848 and 1849 
were occupied by persons whose pi^-emptions under the laws of 
Congress had expired, and their improvements were subject to be 
swept from them at any moment by cash purchasers. A large ma- 
jority of these settlers were unable to pay for their lands, and hav- 
ing already become attached to their homes, and desiring to hold 
them, the State Trustee (Mr. Puett) selected these lands for the use 
of the canal, with an understanding that the occupants should be 
entitled to enter them at the Logansport Land Office, rating at $1 30 
to $1 50 per acre, and that a reasonable credit should be extended 
lo them on the same. This arrangement was approved by the Board, 
and has been faithfully redeemed, so far as the lands have been ap- 

flied for by the occupants, and the term of four years from March, 
850, allowed for final payment, being one fourth each year until 
the entire sum is discharged. The quantity secured in this way to 
actual settlers is about 1^,000 acres. 

The canal lands selected in the years 1848 and 1849, under the 
direction of the State Trustee, heretofore referred to, were brought 
into market on the 39th of May last, at Logansport, and were offered 
at public sale on that day, at the appraisement, after proper public 
notice in some ten or twelve newspapers published in this and 
the adjoining States. From various causes, the sales made on that 
day were limited and few, and but a small po''tion of those lands 
were sold. The Trustees, referring to the practice of the Slate, 
deemed it proper to offer these lands at public auction, reservinc 
from sale^only those tracts on which improvement or settlement had 
beeen made prior to their selection bv the State Trustee. These 
lands were immediately subjected to private entry at the Land Office 



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t Ix^aFtisporf, at (niees^Yimgitfg fitmi $1 '90 to f9' per acre, and a 
rge quanlity of the lands have since been taken up at private sale. 
White referring to the.<e landi^i it is proper to remark that some duties 
lecially assigned to the State Trustee by the Board, in regard to 
lem, have been omitted; which oBnissian was caused by sickness of 
lat officer and his family; but those duties will receive attention at 
ie earliest practicable moment* It is proper to state, in this connec* 
on, hoivever, that no public or private injury could possibly result 
'onn thi^i delay* and. that he is fully aathorized.to arrange tliem so ^' 
> prevent annoyance to the parties interested. 

LiO«»king to the condition of the unfinished portion of the canal, 
dere 1:5 everything to encourage its most ardent friends. The period 
i near at hand when the actual accomplishment of the work will- 
*e aonounced, and when the toil and effort of its early advocates 
viU have a rich reward. This toil and this effort have been put 
brth to accomplish an enterprise of vast magnitude, in which the 
M^mmercial, agricultural and social interests of the people of Indiaoa 
ire deeply involved. The Wabash and Erie Canal is the longest 
work of the kind ever undertaken by any State of the American 
Union; and will be, when completed, the longest continuous artifi- 
sial channel of communication on the European or Ameriean conti- 
nents. It passes through a country of unrivalled productiveness in 
the substantial articles of human foodi and capable of supplying a 
dense and active population. What it is, we know — ^^wbat it will be, 
those who succeed us only can realize. 

Since the Trustees took possession of the canal, in 1847, as agents 
of the State and her creditors, it has been their aim to prosecute the 
work with energy, and to give their best efforts to its completion. 
Laboring to meet the reasonable and just expectations of both par- 
ties to the arrangement of the State Debt, they have constantly 
kept in view the true spirit and meaning of the acts of 1846 and 
1847, and have endeavored to give to them a just and liberal inter- 
pretation, and to carry them into effect as diligently as the means 
at their disposal would permit. In prosecuting an undertaking of 
such magnitude, questions will necessarily arise at almost every step, 
requiring thorough and deliberate investigation, and which, from their 
very nature, are of slow decision. If complaints do arise from this 
cause, it should not be wondered at, when the large interests committed 
to the Trustees, and the number of persons affected by them, are 
considered and comprehended. The unfinished portion of the canal 
must necessarily occupy a large share of their care and attention, 
and employ all their means. When the work shall have been finally 
completed, and these interests become less diversified, every just 
complaint will be met and considered with the utmost promptitude. 



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154 

The Trustees ai^o4 hereto a statcineDt of their receipts and dis- 
bursements during the year ending on the first day of Deeeinber« 
instant ; also a statement of the same from tiie commencement of 
the Trust: 

The balance on hand on the first of December, 

1849, was, $8^,317 €9 

Add to this the amount received during the year, 288,348 43 

Making, $670,066 12 

The amount paid out during the year, is, 501,557 47 

Leaving a balance on hand on the first day of 

December, 1850, of »169,108 65 

Of which, the sum of $102,839 08, is on deposit in the city of 
New York, with the Ohio Life Insurance aud Trust Company and 
other institutions. 

Ail which is respectfully submitted : 

CHARLES BUTLER, ) r„.e/P^* or n^ W 
A. M. PUETT, f IlTi ri^ 

TH08. DOWLING, ) """^ ^' ^^'^• 
Tbbrjb Havtk, Dbccmbbr 26, 1850. 



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CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



Ofpicb of Chief Enoinrbh, ) 

Tbrre Haittb,Dec.4, 1850. \ 

the Board of Trustees Wabaah and Erie Canal : 

GsNTi^BMEif ; I have the honor to submit the following statement 
regard to the present condition of the Canal, finished and unfinish- 
U and the operations thereon during the season now brought to a 
ose. 



THE NAVIGABLE CANAL. 

An early opening of navigation in the Spring has been considered 
nportant, with reference to the trade between Cincinnati and the 
Vabash Valley. The re-building of the several wot>den locks and 
ther structures which were in progress during the last winter, were 
Derefore pressed as rapidly as the severity of the season would per- 
Ht, and the usual cleaning out of the Canal was commenced as ear- 
f as the hard freezing would allow. The character of the weather 
uring the latter part of winter and the thickness of the ice which 
lay have formed in the Canal, must however influence materially 
he time of opening, notwithstanding the most efficient effort to con- 
rol it. On the 18th of March the navigation was opened from the 
kate Line to Lafayette. But the advantages of a communication 
irith Cincinnati were deferred to a later period, by breaches and 
»lher hindering causes on the Miami Canal. On the 1st of April the 
vanal south of Lafayette was filled and the navigation opened to the 
Galley below. As a matter for future reference, connected with this 
'ubject,a statement is hereto appended, marked A., showing the time 
>f the opening and closing of navigation during each year since 1839. 
A few days after the £ite of the last annual report, the masonry 
>f tlie west abutment of the St* Mary's Aqueduct gave way, leaving 



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156 

only the wing walls standing, between which the whole volume of 
water contained in the Canal passed with destructive violence into 
the river, carrying out some six or eight thousand yards of embank* 
ment. Fortunately, sufficient masonry remained to sustain, with but 
little injury, the arches and truss work which supports the Trunk. 
The disastrous consequences of the breach Wjere further alleviated 
from the fact that its occurrence was after the close of navigation. 
From the difficulty of procuring stone suitable for good masonry du- 
ring the suspension of navigation, and the necessity for promptness 
in the repaii-s, to ovoid further damage, it was deemed judicious to 
replace the portion of the abutment carried out, with a timber crib 
filled with rubble stone. Situated as it is, immediately, under the 
wastage of the trunk, this timber will last for many years, and prob- 
ably as long as the stone in adjoining parts of the structure, la the 
temporary absence, on other duties, of both the Superintendent of 
this District and myself, the charge of repairing the abutment was 
confided to P. Hoagland, Esq., of Fort Wayne, by whom the work 
was directed with skill and prosecuted with great energy. The en- 
tire cost was near $4,000 

The passing out of the ice caused some damage to the bridge at 
Oarrollon, over the Wabash river, on which the towing-path is cross- 
ed from the north to the south side. The stronger ice formed in the 
foot of the dam is found very frequently to arrest the floating masses 
which come down that stream, filling the entire channel, and forming 
what is called an ice-goi^. Last winter the river bed was thus filled 
for 5 or 6 miles above the bridge. When this body of ice gave way, 
through the influence of a subsequent thaw, its momentum was suffi- 
cient to remove one of the stone piers from the timber foundation on 
which it was built, depositing the entire mass of masonry in the 
deep water below. The superstructure retained its position with 
but little injury, sinking only 18 inches at this pier, although the dis- 
tance between supports was thus suddenly increased to !M0 feet ia* 
stead of 100 feet, as originally built. The pier has been rebuilt nitli 
stone masonry, the superstructure raised and repaired, and a laige 
amount of protection stone placed around this and the other piers to 
guard against future injury. The cost of this repair is about 

With these exceptions, I have the satisfaction of re|iorting a re> 
markable exemption from casualties of this kind. Between the 
State Line and Coal Creek, 189 miles, no interruptions to navigatiofi 
occurred worthy of note between the opening in March and the 31st 
of November. The largest breach during this period occurred two 
miles north of Lafayette, in the month of October, and this stopped 
navigation less than two days, and its repair cost less than two hund- 
red dollars. On the newly and exposed Division of the Canal be- 
tween Coal Creek and Terre Haute, several large breaches occurred 
during the early part of the season. Prom Terre Haute to Polnl 
Commerce no breaches have occurred, although the water was boC 
recently introduced and the banks not fully settled. 



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Considering the great length of Dovigable line, the variety ofm^- 
hanical structuves» and the exposed situation of mauy parts of the 
!anal, there is ground for congratulation upon the exemption from 
reaches during the past season. To the vigilance of the Superin- 
sndents on the several Districts, and to the excellent system of in- 
pection and supervision adopted by the Board, must be attributed 
his gratifying result. 

On the morning of the 21st November, a breach occurred in the 
owing-path, 11 miles south of Lafayette, which should be specially 
loticed. It was unquestionably caused by an excavation through 
he bank, ma^fe the night pi^vioos by some person unknown. Only 
•ne week before, the opposHebnnk at the some point was cut through, 
»ut in that case theattent'on of a pei*son residing near by was ari^es- 
»d by the noise of the falling water, just in lime to prevent a breacb. 
n like manner, during the fall of 1S49, the bank near the same plaee 
ras three times cut through, but in each ioatance was discovered by 
hose employed to watch the Ganal, in time to prevent serious dam* 
ge. The tool marks atrd other signs noticed by those first at the 
ilace, fully assures them that these gaps in the bank were made with 
he shovel. By whom they were cut, and for what object, is as much 
mystery to the respectable farmers residing in the neighborhood, as 
the Superintendent. A liberal reward has been offered for the 
rrest and conviction of the offender, and through the efficient co* 
peration of the county authorities it is hoped that a crime, causing 

much inconvenience and loss to the commercial interests of tke 
ommunity, will not go unpunished. 

The renewal of perishable wooden structures still constitutes, and 
oust for some time continue to form, a large item in the annual repair 
xpenditure. During the past year there have been rebuilt 4 lift 
3cks, 3 dam abutments, and 12 road bridges. Contractn have re- 
ently been made for rebuilding, during the next season, 2 lift locks, 

1 guard locks, and one dam abutment. A part of the cut stone lock 
lext below Logansport will require rebuilcling before the openiiig of 
lavigation next' spring. Arrangements have already been made 
rith a view to an efficient prosecution of the work, so as to avoid 
lelay in opening navigation beyond the usual time. 

The Birmin^am and Wea Bluffs, the first situated about 5 miles 
ibove, and the second 3 miles below Lafayette, continue to require 

heavy annual expenditure in order to maintain the proper width 
nd depth of canal. At both iMiints the Canal was cleaned out to 
ts full size before the opening of navigation, and this capacity has 
>een maintained as nearly as was found practicable during thesaa- 
on. A thorough cleaning out can only be made when the Canal js 
mpty. But the water cannot be withdrawn during the dry seasoDt 
or the reason that a regular and unchecked flow of water irotn the 
»eder at Dulphi, under a full head, is essential to the maintenance of 
navigation to Coal Creek. The sand bars ware removed as tlioroi;^- 
Y as could be done with the water remainii^ in the Canal» and^y 



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158 

this course boats were enabled to pass without interrupt]on« and ii 
much water was at all times passed through the Canal at the We& 
Bluffs as could be forced through the long level below, known as Ae 
Attica level. 

During the year there has been expended in the repair eervice ht- 
tween the State Line and Coal Creek, including pay ofSaperinteDd. 
ents, the sum of $52,683 26, which should be classified under seven: 
heads as follows: 

For expense of repair boats with the r^ular force ^12,763 ft 
For repairs of breaches in embankments, aqueducts, 

, culverts, &c., IfiSH ffi 

For cleaning out canal in the spring. 6,165 41 

For re-buildmg wooden locks, dam abutments, &c., 10,399 31 

For addinff new works and i*aising guard banks,* • 4,351 03 
For re-building and repair of bridges for State and 

county roads, ^ . . . S,733 74 

For lock tending, * 3,451 « 

.For salary of Superintendents,* • 5,886 6S 

$53,683 K 

Of which there belongs to the general head of ^ ex- 
traordinary repairs" the sum of • 17,383 (fe 

Leaving as the cost oi '^ordinary repairs" for the 
year the sum of #35,300 IS 

This for the whole distance embraced, 195 miles, including the Sl 
Joseph feeder, shows an avera^ per mile of $181. 

The division of this expenditure between the several repair dis- 
• tricts, anH also the proportion of the work performed by contract, is 
shown in the annexed tabular statement marked B. 

The expenditure for repair of breaches, &c., in the new Caiutl 
south of Coal Creek, up to 1st July, was, according to general usage 
in such cases, charged to the construction account, as being incideat 
to filling the Canal with water. Since that date» there has been pak 
for "ordinary repairs'* between Coal Creek and Terre Haute, the 
sum of $2,162 14, which added to the cost of repairs north of Col 
Creek, gives $54,845 40 as the total sum charged to repairs during 
' the year. 

Taking the three years 1849-9 and 50, the expenditure for repairs, 

ordinary and extraordinary, including pay of Superintendents 

amounts to $166,285 41. The cost of repairs for the same years. 

' and including the same length of Canal, was estimated in my report 

. to the Board, dated Nov. 6, 1847, at the sum of $195,325. 

In point of economy the system of superintendence and repairs ot 
the Wabash nnd Erie Canal, as adopted and carried out, wiH con- 
pare favorably with that of any similar work. Taking the paj- 



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iso 

lents for "ordinary repairs,** which term excludes the re-bullding of 
erishable structures aud such expenses as would have been avoided 
ad these works been built of durable material in the first place* the 
nnual cost per mile, for the last three years, is $1^. Or, including 
be re-building of the wooden locks and other timber structures, with 
II new works, the yearly average per mile for the last three years is 
[285. In these averages the pay of Superintendents and Engineer 
nnduded. 

On the Ohio Canal, including navigable feeders, the average an- 
iual cost of repairs for iineen yeai*s, from 1835 to 1849, inclu3ive, 
eas $394 per mile. 

On the Miami and Erie Canal and branches, the yearly average 
or the same time was $361 per mile. 

Taking the entire system of Canal navigation in the State of New 
fork, including the main lines and lateral Carfals, the average annual 
est of repairs, during a period of twenty-three years, from 1836 to 
1848, inclusive, appears to have been $645 per mile. 

The season just passed has been one of unusual drought, reducing 
he flow of the streams relied upon as feeders much below the quan- 
ity found running therein when the Canal was originally planned 
lod located. By keeping the dams perfectly tight, the navigation 
las been adequately supplied, excepting on some portions of the di* 
'isioQ below Lafayette. During three months of the time boats 
:ould take out from Covington and Perrysville but three fourths of 
I load, as appears from the Collector's books, notwithstanding the 
ixertions made by the Superintendents in passing water from the 
.eders above Lafayette, and the large expenditure in cutting out the 
;rass. But the greatest difficulty was experienced on the Coal Creek 
evel, extending from Perrysville to Sugar Creek, 14 miles in length. 
The Coal Creek feeder is the only supply available on this level, and 
his, according to the gua^e made by Mr. Johnston, the Superintend* 
;nt, afToixled but 643 c. feet per minute, which is less than was 
.vithdrawn from the Canal by the Perrys\nlle side cut, as appears 
rom his measurement of this wastage. The supply as far south as 
5ugar Creek was therefore to he drawn from the feeders above La* 
'ayette, with but inconsiderable aid from intermediate streams. The 
luantity received into the Canal from the feeders between Lafayette 
md Coat Creek, according to guages made by Mr. Morley, the Su- 
)erintendent, was from the Wea 275 c. feet and from the Shawnee 
t20 c. feet per minute. With a 40 feet Canal, it was found unprac- 
icable to pass through the long levels between the Wea Lock and 
Covington a full supply for so great a length of line. 

The experience of the past and precedmg seasons has fully vindi- 
cated the action of the Trustees in decHning to make or permit any 
idditional connection with the Wabash river by locks, which, by 
Ira wing their supply of water from the main line, would impair still 
'urther its naviga.iion. This policy was forred upon them by the 
lerl^Tsities of ^e caise, and its propriety must be apparrot to all, 



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Iflp 

however boneslly a differeat view may have been entertained in the 
first place. 

It is aot [Hobable that another season of extreme drought mill iin- 
mediately eosue* nor will the leakage on the new Canal between 
Coal Creek aod Sugar Creek be as great as heretofore* A better 
navigation mav therefore be anticipated during the next year. 
Should the feeders be insufficient to maintain 4 feet depth in these 
levels, this cannot occur, in the nature of things, before mid-summer, 
giving ample time to transport the pork and grain now in the coun- 
try, so far as shippers may prefer the northern route. 

The division of new work between Coal Creek and Terre Haals, 
from its exposed aitualton and the nature of the materials forming 
the banks, has been longer in ao|uiring pcrmenance than was antici- 
pated. The banks appears now to have become consolidated and 
the wastage of water Js diminished. The dams, aqueducts and locks 
are in excellent condition. A good and r^ular navigation, enabling 
boats to carry out full hads^ mav therefore, with reason, be expected 
in the spring throughout the whole Canal from the State Line to Tent 
Haute, and thence to Point Commerce. 

The commerce of the Wabash Valley, tbe course of its trade, and 
the proportion of the exports diverted from the Canal by the River 
navigation, have claimed my attention, as in previous seasons. The 
tabular statement hereto appended, marked C, shows at one view the 
total amount of each of the leading articles of produce shipped south 
by the Wabash river during the shipping season of 1850, from all 
points between Delphi and Terre Haute, both inclusive, while tbe 
statistics reported by the Collectors will exhibit the Canal shipments 
for same district. The aggregate of River shipments, as seen by tbe 
table, including the export of corn, is 22,873 tons, of which 11,334 
tons were transpc»rted in flat boats, and 11,539 tons in steamboats. 
The whole niunber of flat boats loaded with produce, taking the 
entire River above and including Terre Haute and vicinity, was 85 
or thereabouts. No flat boats were loaded above the mouth of the 
Vermillion river. 

Comparing this statement with that contained in my anntial report 
for 1848, a marked chaoffe will be observed in the relative propor- 
tion of steamboat and flat boat transportation. The increase of 
steam navigation is due mainly to the erection of the dam and lock 
at tlie Grand Rapids, by which a rise of less height enables boats to 
pass to the upper towns, without risk. The influence of the Cans!, 
. as it is extended, with other causes, is rapidlv superceding the flat 
boat navigation, and their use will very soon be wholly abindoned. 

With reference to the proportion of the entire produce shipped 
south by the Wabash river, as compared with the amotmt shippsd 
north by way of the Canal, the fblliiwijag (acts may be stated. 

Taking that portion of the Valley extending from Lafayette to 
Terre Haute, both inclusive, the total export of Pork, Lard, Bacoa 
and Buikmeatt amounU to 17,895 tuns| of which 5,443 tons found 



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161 

ts way to market by the Canal, and 12,453 tons by the River. The 
otal export of corn wns 1,471,592 bushels, of which 1,151,592 
•ushels was shipped by canal, and 320,000 bushels by ri\er, as nearly 
s can be ascertained. 

As regards the lower portion of this district the proportion ship- 
ed by each route furnishes no reliable criterion for future years. 
louth of Coal Creek the Canal had just been filled, and from the 
baracter of the banks a good navigation the first season could not 
rith reason have been expected. Under these circumstances, holders 
f Pork, Lard, Sulkment, &c., chose to avail themselves of the River 
avi^ation, which,from the character of the season, was remarkably 
;ood during the winter and early spring months. When this division 
hall command the same degree of confidence now felt in other por- 
ioDs of the Canal, a part of the Pork, Lard, &c. as far south as 
'erre Haute, will doubtless be shipped north by Canal, more espe- 
ially since, under the new tariff of tolls, no more is charged on 
hese articles from that point than from Lafayette. The influence of 
limate and the anticipated reduction in tolls and transportation 
barges from Lake Erie to the sea board, which must follow the en- 
irgement of the Erie Canal and the opening of new channels, will 
Ivor the northern route. The liberal reduction in tolls on the Wa- 
>ash and Erie Canal in June last, amounting on Pork, &c., to 58 cts. 
ler ton from Lafayette, and f 1 53 per ton from Terre Haute, will 
loubtless influence the direction of trade. 

Confining the comparison to the section between Delphi and Per- 
ysville, both inclusive, where the character of the Canal navigation 
} better established, the division of irade is much more favorable to 
he canal. During the past season the whole export of Pork, Lard, 
(aeon and Bulkmeat from this portion of the valley, is found to have 
>eea 8,417 tons, of which 5,4^ tons took the northern route by 
:anal, while 2,975 tons was shipped by the River. Of com, the 
otal export was 1,197,505 bushels, of which 1,102,505 bushels 
•assed through the canal to a northern market, while 95,000 bushels 
vas shipped south by the river. 

It will be observed that the River presents a stronger competition 
nth the Canal for the transportation of Pork, Bacon, Lard, &c., 
han for any other articles of export. This is mainly owing to the 
ict that this product is shipped in the form of rolling freight and 
herefore suited to steam boat transportation, and is always ready 
>r shipment at the season of high water in the Wabash. The ten- 
ancy to the southern route, seems however to be rather diminishing, 
otwithstanding the improvement of the Rapids. The total ship- 
lent of these articles by tlie River, from the section of the valley be- 
ween Lafayette and Perrysville, both inclusive, for the last three 
ears, is given in the statement hereto appended, marked D,from 
i^hich it appears that the aggregate in 1S50 was less than in 1849 by 
•23 tons, and less than in 1848 by 1,103 tons. 

The short crop of corn in the bhio vallev, and further south, with 
2D18 



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163 

the increased consumption for distillation on the Ohio River, created 
during the last Winter and Spring an unprecedented southern de- 
mand, which swelled the proportion of River shipments of this arti- 
cle, especially from the valley below Perrysville. Present appearan- 
ces indicate that this demand will continue during another year, but 
to what extent it may diminish the shipment of Corn by the Canal, 
it is yet too ea riy to predict. 

Of Wheal, usually one of the chief articles for revenue, the export 
this year has been inconsiderable, amounting only to 187,625 bushek 
from Lafayette and points below, all of which wasshipp^ by Canal. 
The entire failure of last year's crop, and the low pricesince harvest, 
accounts for ihe falling off. At this time there is a large amount of 
wheat in the country, and a good revenue from this source may be 
anticipated during the first half of next year. Wheat is not usually 
shipped by the Kiver, except as it may be first manufactured into 
flour. 

The trade between the Wabash valley and the city of Cincinnati, 
by way of the Miami Canal, with which our work connects, seems 
to be increasing in importance, under the judicious and discriminating 
i-ates of toll adopted by the joint action of the Trustees and the Ohio 
Board. The Collector at Fort Wayne, in his statistical tables, has 
this year, with considerable additional labor, separated the Cincin- 
nati trade from that with Toledo. By comparison it appears, that of 
the aggregate tolls collected from goods and merchandize coming 
into the Stale, the receipts from the first bears to the last named 
trade, the proportion of 1 to 3 6-7. 

The large receipts this year at the Fort Wayne Office, where the 
toll on imports are collected, indicate an increasing revenue from 
this source. With the exception of the early spring supplies, it is 
l>elieved that the Canal will form, permanently, the channel through 
which a larj;e district of country on each side of the Wabash, em- 
bracing a part of the State of Illinois, will l>e supplied with mer- 
chandize. 



OF THE LINE UNDER CONSTRUCTION. 

The report of the Re<!ident Engineer, herewith submitted, will be 
found full and satisfactory in regard to this branch of the service, 
giving every necessary detail as to the progress of each Division, the 
causes which have operated to retard the work in some instances, 
the probable time of finishing each portion of the Canal, with the 
estimated cost thereof, under existing contracts. 

The portion of the report relating to the survey and final location 
of the Evansville Division, extending from Petersburg to the Ohio 
river, represents the character of the country, ihe obstacles interpo- 
sing, and the manner in which they have been overcome; and con- 



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16^ 

tains also his estimate of the cost of this Divisjion, made upon the 
completion of the survey, upon which was based the contract recent- 
ly made for the completion of the Canal. To avoid unnecessary 
repetition, I beg leave merely to refer to this report. 

The remainder of the Canal to the Ohio river, having been placed 
under contract, by the consummation of the arrangement with Messrs. 
Forrer, Sturges and Hosmer, for the construction of the Evansville 
Division, it may be proper to exhibit, in a condensed view, by a sum- 
mary of the severaf Divisions, the probable cost of completing the 
e:itire work from the time it was transferred to the Trustees. 



There has been paid and charged to con- milbs. 
struction account on the Coal Creek Divis- 
ion, including allowance to contractors for 
loss by floods, &c., and including also re- 
pairs of breaches to 1st July, 36.76 

Payments charged to construction account on 
Eel river Division, including repairs to 1st 
Oct. 1850, 42.09 

Estimated cost of Newberry Division, under 
existing contracts, as per accompanying 
report of Mr. Ball, 17.01 

Estimated cost of Maysville Division,as per 
accompanying report of Mr. Ball, 23.14 

Estimated cost of Petersburg Division, as per 
accompanying report of Mr. Ball, 16.85 

Estimated cost of Evansville Division, as per 
accomyanying report of Mr. Ball, 54.62 

Payments for engineering, including surveys 
and superintendence of the work under 
contract from commencement of Trust to 
Ist Dec. 1850, 

Payments charged to construction account 
for completing the Canal between Coving- 
ton and Coal Creek, 



COST. 

•9383,477 84 

*291,221 18 

167,875 00 
168,787 20 
347,213 32 
561,341 59 

42,607 21 
5,495 51 



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164 

Payments charged to construction for repair iiiu». con*. 

of Pigeon Dam and Canal, adjoining, in 
184S, 



Allowance for engineering and for unfor- 
aeen contingencies which may arise in the 
construction of the remainder of the work, 



Total length and cost. 1 90.47 



4,066 32 



40,000 00 
$2,012,085 17 



The same work was estimated by Mr. Fauntleroy, in 1845, at 
$1,910,371, falling short about 5 per cent. 

•NoTBw— The o<Mt of theie two DifimuM exoaodi the mini slatod in Mr. Mi's tepoit bf 
tbo torn of $19,139 63. The difieience ie made up of damagee by floo^ miilitiiOBri 
bridfea, repair of bfeaehea, &c, charged to construction. 



That estimate was, of course, predicated upon the then existing pri- 
ces of labor, which appears to have been about $13 per month, and 
upon the basis of cash payments. Considering the great advance 
in labor, together with the fact that the closing Division of the work 
amounting to over half a million, was necessarily let upon a credit, 
some excess of actual cost might reasonably have been expected.— 
The near agreement is rather creditable to the judgment and care of 
thosd by whom the original estimate was made. 

In the foregoing statement of cost, payments for damages for right 
of way are not included, nor is there any allowance for the pro- 
posed Morgan County reservoir, the construction of this work hav- 
ing been deferred until the necessity for i^n additional supply of wa- 
ter on the Eel river summit level, shall seem to require it 

Of the whole length of Canal which it devolved upon the Tros- 
tees to construct, 190.47 miles, 79 miles were navigated during the 
past season, extending south to Point Commerce (or Worthington.) 
Another section of l3 miles extending to the crossing of White riv- 
er is now very nearly finished, and will be filled with water at the 
opening of navigation in the Sfmng. Strong hopes were entertained 
of adding, at the same time, 33 miles more to this navigation, extend- 
ing it to Maysviile, Among the causes which have operated to dis- 
appoint this expectation, the prevalence of cholera during the past 
season has been the chief. By this scourge, with the consequent de- 
lay in getting the laborers back to the line, as much as three or four 
months were lost in the prosecution of the contracts, and as this de- 
lay occurred at the season most favorable for the excavation of the 
wet work on this Division, its effect has injuriously retarded the com- 
pletion of the Canal. In the course of next season, the work will be 
navigable continuously from the State Line to Maysviile, a total 
distance of 308 miles. The closing Division lying between Peters- 



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165 

« 

boig and Evansville, haviDg been usderUiken by a company com* 
bining, in a high degree, the necessary experience^ character and 
meansi agreeing in their contract to finish the same by the !•! of 
November, 185^, a sufficient guarantee is afforded for the completion 
of the Canal, and the passage of boats by that time, throughout the 
entire line from Lake Erie to the Ohio River, a total distance of 463i 
miles. 

lUspMUfull y aubmtlad: 

J. L. WILLIAMS, 

Chief Engineer. 



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166 



STATEMENT A. 



Skowing the times of opening and closing navigation on tJie WaboA 
and Erie Canal at Fort Wayne and Lafayette in each year from 
1839 to 1850, as shown by the Collectors bookSf taking thedaU^ 
the first and last clearance. 



Tear 9. 


M Uf^9tU, 


JSt FTt inyM. 


Op$%U, 


CUtU. 


Opened. 


C/Mftf. 


1839, 






March 98, 
April «, 
April?, 
March 31, 

April 14. 
March 95, 
April 3, 
March 18, 


December 17 


1840 






1841, 




December 14, 
November 91, 
December 30, 
December 14, 
November 97, 
December 19, 
December 17, 
December 15, 
December 10, 
December 8, 


December nl 
November 17. 
December?, 
December?, 
November 98, 
December 4, 
December M. 
December 91. 
December 11. 
December?. 


1849. 
1843, 
1844^ 
1845, 
1846, 
1847, 
1848 
1840, 
1830, j 


March 10, 
April 97, 
March 0, 
March 11, 
March 91, 
April 94, 
March 90, 
March 14, 
March 18, 



NoTB.— The opening of navlcatlon is often Influenced by the amount of the spring repain. Tit 
date of cloaing indicate truly the influence of climate. 



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167 



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STATEMENT D. 

Camparaiive statement of the shipments by River of Pork, Lard^ 
Bulkmeat and Bacon, for the years 1848, 1849 and 1850, from 
Zjqfayetle to Perry smUe^ both inclusive, 

1848. Pounds. 

14,648 Barrels Pork, 4,394,400 

1,309 Hogsheads, Hams and Shoulders, 1,178,100 

2,747 Kegs Lard, 164,820 

4843 Barrels Lard, 1,283,395 

Pounds Bulkmeat, 2,181,679 

Total pooads, 9,202,394 

Total tons, 4,601 

1849. 

10,779 Barrels Pork, 3,233,700 

742 Hogsheads Hams and Sho«xIders, 667,800 

4,141 BarrelsLard, 1,097,365 

3,456 Kegs Lard, 307,860 

Founds Bulkmeat, 1,789,825 

Total pomkls, 6,996,050 

Total tons, 3498 

1850. 

11,548 Barrels Pork, 3,464,400 

1,045 Hogsheads Hams and Sboolders, 940,500 

I»746 Kegs Lard, 104,760 

2»024 BarrelsLard, 536,360 

Pounds Bttlkmeat, • 904,029 

Total pounds, 5,950,049 

Total tons, : . 2,975 



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170 



RESIDENT ENGINEER'S REPORT. 

ENGINEER'S OFFICE, ) 

Tbeeb-Hautb, Nov. 25th, 1850. ) 

To J. L. Williams Esq., Chief Engineer: 

Sir ; It again becomes my duty to report the condition of the 
work under my charge as Resident Engineer. 

The Eel river Division of the Wabash and Erie Canal, extending 
from Terre- Haute to Point Commerce, a distance of 42 miles and i 
chains, was completed the Ist of June last and filled with water. 
On the 7th of that month, a boat arrived at Point Commerce, since 
which time there has been regular navigation for light draught boats, 
except during the extreme drought of August and September, whea 
Eel river failed to afford an ample supply of water. 

In common with all the streams in the western part of the State 
Eel river has been much lower the past season than it has ever been 
known. The drought has been most extraordinary, commenceing 
as early as June and continuing to the first of November, with bat 
an occasional shower, which made little if any impression on the fee- 
ders. During all this period there was but one rbe in Eel river cau« 
sing the water to flow over the Dam in any considerable quantity, 
and at this time the pool is from 18 inches to 2 feet below the comb 
of the Dam. 

Considering the unusual drought of the season, the fact that a 
new Canal had to be filled and supplied, it may be reasonable to con- 
clude that there will not again be so great a deficiency of water on 
the Summit Level of the J^l river Division, as seriously to interrupt 
the navigation. But should it be deemed advisable not to run this 
risk, the difficulty may be entirely obviated by the construction of 
the Morgan county Reservoir, as contemplated in the original sur- 
veys. 

From the Locks just below the junction of the Eel river feeder 
and main line to Point Commerce, or Worthington, the Canal has 
been filled, and amply supplied during the season, with water from 
the Splunge Creek Reservoir. The levels have generally stood at 



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171 

from 2i to 3 feet above bottom, which is as much water as was need- 
ed for the navigation, This portion of the line is 31 miles and 30 
chains long, and all the water required on it, has been passed through 
an area of five-tenths of a foot under an average pressure of 5i feet, 
together with the leakage through the Locks «t the sou'h end of the 
iSummit level. The former cannot exceed 300 cubic feet per min- 
ute, and the latter may be as much as 400 cubic feet. This would 
be at the rate of 32 cubic feet per minute, per mile, which is about 
i the usual allowance, and probably not more than oneiifth thequan- 
tity that has been required during the past season on the line from 
Sugar Creek to Terre-Haute. The great difference arises from the 
nature of the soil, in the two districts of country. North of Terre- 
Haute, we encounter much coarse gravel and sand, but South the 
excavations and embankments are made almost entirely in a UHigh 
tenacious clay, which is quite impervious to water. 

There has been paid on this Division for 
construction. $376,626 54 

For damages by floods on the Eel river 
Feeder Dam. 2,001 60 

For damages by floods last winter on oth- 
er portions of the line. 2,516 C7 

For repairs and expenses incidental to 

filling the Canal with water, 2,640 42 

'^^^SS 69 

Total amount paid and charged to con- 
struction up to the time of opening 
navigation the 1st of June, 1850, $283, 785 23 

There has been paid for repairs, ordinary 
and extraordinary, for June and July, - - $1,323 51 

For the months of August and September, 908 19 

Total $2,231 70 



In future, it is believed the cost of repairs on this Division may be 
considerably reduced ; but should the sum of $908 19 be taken as a 
i>)ean, the average cost per mile would be $115 00. 

It will be seen, by reference to former reports^ that the amount 
paid up to the opening of navigation on the Eel river Divisicm, vk- 
coeds the original estimate, the sum of $10,154 12 which is a much 
less excess than might reaaonably have been expectedt considering 



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the damages by floods and the advance of the wnges or labor, 
amounting in some sections on this Division to fully 50 per cent.- 
It was worked on during the winter under great disadvantage, and 
completed for the sum above stated, only by the extraordinary ex- 
ertion of all concerned. 

The Newberry Division, extending from Worthington and Point 
Commerce, a distance of 17 miles and 1 chain, is so far advanced is 
to give reasonable assurance of its entire completion in time for the 
opening for navigation next season. Thirteen miles of the opper 
portion of this Division, extending to the commencement of Slack 
Water on White river, is now very nearly finished, and may certain- 
ly be opened for navigation in the Sprint; and should we succeed in 
completing the Newberry Dam, before the floods come npon os, the 
remaining four miles, extending to Newberry, may be opened for 
navigation at the same time. The payments on this Division for 
construction have amounted to $132,4^25 01, and it is estimated that 
$35,499 99 will be required to complete it, including the sum of 
$5,640 which is the amount of per cent retained on sections not 
yet finished. 

On^the Maysville Division, extending from Newberry to Maysville, 
a distance of 23 miles and 1 1 chains, the estimated value of work 
done on the 15th of October, amounted to $104,117 19. The esti- 
mated value of work then to be done amounted to $64,670 01. The 
payments on construction have amounted to $95»560 80, showing 
per cent retained on estimate to contractors to the amonnt of 
$S,556 39. Since the estimate was made the 15th of October, there 
has probably been $30,000 worth of work done on this Di vision, 
reducing the value of work yet to be done to about $34,670 01. 

The estimates on the Petersburgh Division have ainoanted to 
$186,854 05, leaving the estimated value of work yet to be done 
$160,359 27. The paymenU have amounted to $170,048 05,shov- 
ing retained per cent to the amount of $16,806* 

On the Evansville Division, there bare been no estimates afi^ 
but preparations are making to commence nearly all the sectioosi 
and it is probable that, by the 1st of January, work may be dooito 
the amount of $20,000. 



GENERAL REMARKS. 

In view of the importance of completing the Newberry Damaw 
the Majrsville Division this season, measures were eariy taken to«^ 
cure that object. In June last, the contractors were notified ^ 
time was of the essence of their contracts, and that the work 00| 
be r^ularly prosecuted at 8Qch rate as to Misure the coaipletioD<)^ 
eaoh job by the time stipulated. It was intended to follow this i^P 
by frequent personal importunity, and, if possible, avoid tbedifficultj 
and expense of finishing up a Division of work during the wint^' 



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173 

: our anticipations were entirely frustrated by the breakiag out of 
I cholera amongst the laborers on the line. 
The cholera first made its appearance on the Canal about the 
ihof May; apparently leaving fora time, it again appeared the 
th of June, inducing many laborers to leave the line. By the 10th 
July it had attained such malignancy as to cause a total suspen- 
m of operationst which were not again generally resumed until af« 

the 30th of August. The cholera prevailed on the Canal for not 
)re than two months^ but the loss of time from this cause could not 
ve been less than four months. 

Oo the first appearance of cholera on the line, the laborers became 
irroed,and commenced leaving. Soon the panic was such that all 
ho could get away bad abandoned the work; and it was not until 
me weeks after the cholera bad entirely ceased in the i*q^on of the 
laal that laborers could be induced to return slowly and cautious- 
to the work. The deaths amongst those engaged on the Canal 
nounted to about 150. Id addition to the delay caused by cholera, 
ther sickness has prevailed to considerable extent on the line, so 
At it has been extremely difficult to get or keep a tolerably good 
Tce, on many of the most backward jobs. 

No less than 33 sections have been declared abandoned and relet 
t advanced prices; and we have been thus far favored with an unu- 
)ally fine falli but still so much remains to be done at this late peri- 
d» that I cannot give any positive assurance of the completion of 
M Canal from Newberry to Mays villa in time for the opening of 
avigation early next season. Every effort is now making to ae- 
omplish this object, and should the weather continue favorable an- 
il late in the winter, we may be able to finish up before the work i^ 
uspended by the rains and floods. 

On the Petersburg Division, the work has been retarded as much 
s possib'e, except on a few jobs, with a view to concentrate the 
>rce on the Maysville Division* Contractors having work on both 
)ivtsions were directed to suspend operations on the lower, until 
heir jobs were completed on the upper; and in all the relettings a 
:ondition of the new contracts was, that nothing should be done be- 
ow, until the work then relet, on the Maysville Division, was en- 
irely completed^ These means have been efficient; but the difficul- 
yof getting laborers has been so great, and so much time was lost 
«fore a respectable force could be collected, that I fear we may be 
overtaken by bad weather before all is accomplished. Most of the 
i^ork remaining to be done is such that it cannot be progressed with, 
o any tolerable advantage, except during the dry season. Even af- 
er this unusually long continuance of dry weather, it has been very 
expensive and difficult to get in the Lock and Culvert foundations. 
The expense of bailing and pumping has been a very heavy item of 
H)st to ail contractors having such work. 

In endeavoring to i*etanl the work on the Petersburg Division, 



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174 

the White river Aqueduct was made an exception. It was deemed 
advisable to have the foundations of this important structure put in 
and secured, thi9 season, and the contractor has been directed to do 
this if practicable. But the interruption and delay from cholera 
and other causes, has been so serious, that we shall only succeed in 
part. 

Three of the piers are expected to be founded on the solid rock — 
the first two from the south side have been without difficulty, as the 
water was not deep; but for the third it was finally determined to 
build a coffer dam and excavate the sand, nine feet under water, 
down to the solid rock. From the solid rock in the bed of the river 
to within one foot of low-water mark> this pier will be raised by a 
platform of hewn timbers, laid alternately cross-wise and longitudi- 
nally with the stream, one foot apart, the spaces to be filled with 
small stone to prevent a current of water through the foundation. — 
This timber pJatform has an average batter of 9 inches to the foot 
all around, giving it a width at the base of 15 feet. The two re> 
mainiog piers will be founded on piles, driven firmly into the bed of 
the river, and securely protected with stone and brush. Ordinarily, a 
piled foundation does not require protection, but in this case the sand 
in the river bed, extending down many feet, is of such a light char- 
acter, that it might in some causality be washed out to so great a 
depth, without it was protected, as to endanger the stability of the 
piers. 

When my last report was made, the White river Aqueduct was 
intended to consist of five spans of 85 feet in the clear. Since that 
time it has been ^determined to add another span, making five piers 
and giving the Aqueduct trunk a total length of 558 feet, extending 
it 6i feet on to each abutment, and allowing 7 feet to each pier. — 
When this work was first let out, it was expected to procure the 
stone for the masonry from the limestone formation of Lawrmce 
county, and boat them down White river. After opening the quar- 
ries, near Wood's Ferry, which proved a failure, some sand stone 
within seven miles of the Aqueduct were examined ; and it was fi- 
nally determined to abandon the former, and use the latter, for the 
masonry of the Aqueduct. A new contract was made, and a inai 
saving will result from the change, of sonoetbing over $3,000. 
But the oddiUonai pier and increased length of AquMuct-trunk will 
add to the cost of this structure some $7,000, leaving a net ex- 
cess of cost, resulting from these changes, of about $4,000. The 
sand stone now being used are believed to be entirely durable, and 
the additional length of the Aqueduct will give it greater security. 

Th^ entire line now under contract, embracing the work recently 
let to Messrs. Forrer, Hosmer & Go., is llli miles in length, extend- 
ing from Point Commerce or Worthington, to EvansvilTe. The ef- 
fective force on that portion of this line under contract last year, is 
equal to 1,989 men. On the new letting, the force may equal 500 



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175 

len. Wages have raogdd fromSTi cents to $1 per day for men, in- 
luding their board. 

LOCATING SERVICE. 

Last spring a locating party was employed to make the final lo- 
tation of all that portion of the line not then under contract, be- 
ween Petersburg and Evansvillet and prepare it for letting. Al- 
:hough several experimental surveys had been made in this resion of 
country ,the lines having become almost utterly obliterated, and inaoy 
3f the field notes lost, it was a work of much labor to prepare a final 
ocation. The party took the field early in the Spring, and the seas- 
on proving to be wet and inclement, the difficulties and labors of the 
service were much increased, but the work wa^ completed and the 
party disbanded by the 12th of June. 



DESCRIPTION OF THE LINE. 

After crossing the main road leading south from Petersburg a 
short distance, the line is curved to the right, abruptly, and a straight 
line run across the valley of Pride's Creek, striking the high ground 
on the opposite side, in the shortest distance. The embankment 
across the valley of this stream will be about IS feet high, but it is 
not long. The surface of low water of the creek is 18 feet B, and 
an arched timber culvert, of 21 feet chord, is estimated to pass the 
stream. After crossing Pride's Creek, the Canal is located along the 
west slope, up to the north end of Patoka Summit, ana a cheap line 
is obtained. The north half of the Patoka deep cut, remaining then 
to be put under contract, was as carefully examined and sounded as 
our limited time would admit of. In this cut we estimate 81,539 
cubic yards of earth excavation, including about 4,260 cubic yards 
of shale and slaty rock, and 17,735 cubic yards of solid limestone 
rock in the bottom of the cut. This section is one mile and five 
chains long, and at the north end the cutting is 230 feet, in the cen« 
tre 650 feet, and at the south end 23,60, which is the deepest point 
on the section. We pass over the portion of this deep cut, let out 
November I5th, 1848, and commence again at the south end. From 
this point the location follows the valley of Flat Creek, and a cheap 
line is obtained for about two miles, A Lock of 7.90 feet lift is in- 
troduced one mile below the south end of the Summit, and from this 
point the level is maintained until after crossing Pigeon Summit. 

The valley of Flat Creek descends very rapidly. We soon run out 
of cutting and find it necessary to trace the line along the hill sides. 
There are no large streams crossed until we reach Patoka river, but 
the branches and small streams have remarkably wide valleys, and 
the level being high, the embankments are quite expensive. 



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176 

Little Flat Creek is the first branch of ibis kind* Its valley is 13 
chains wide: average height of embanlcment 14 feet: surface of low 
water of creek 14 feet B . A rectangular submerged culvert equal 
to an arch of fifteen feet chord is estimated. We next encounter a 
small branchy whose valley is 13 chains wide: average height of em- 
bankment 18i feet, and surface of low water 15 feet B. A square 
cornered wooden culvert equal to an arch of 8 feet chord is estima- 
ted for this branch. The third and last stream of this character 
north of Patoka river, has a valley 18 chains wide, requiring an em- 
bankment of 20i feet average height, and a culvert similar to the 
former of 8 feet chord : the low water surface being 19 feet B. 

Thus far we have generally had single bank along the steep and 
broken hill sides, except at the valleys above mentioned. We now 
come to the wide and expensive valley of Patoka. The embank- 
ments across this valley will be in all 66 chains lon^ ; 45 chains of this 
length, is based on the old embankment, made in 1838 and 1839, and 
the remaining 21 chains, on the natural surface. The first portion 
will have an average height of about 12 feet, and the second 21 feet. 
The first portion will contain 94,981 cubic yards, and the second 
101,331) cubic yards. The surface of low water of Patoka river was 
found to be SOiM) feet B.; but this is the pool of a dam. The bed of 
the stream is 36 feet B. It is intended to cross Patoka by means of 
a plain aqueduct — an open trunk, 18 feet wide, consisting of one 
span in the middle, of 50 feet, and two on each side of 36 feet each. 
The trunk will terminate at each end, in the bank, on a timber abut- 
ment, extending down below bottom 6 feet. In front of this, the 
embankment will have an ordinary slope, and will be protected with 
a pavement of stone. For the middle span, two piers will be built 
of timber, in crib form, and filled with stone. Their bases will be 
about 36 feet B, and total height 42 feet The* other spans will be 
sustained by strong framed bents, resting on the banks of the creek. 
Patoka is a very favorable stream for this kind of crossing. The 
banks are bold and strong, being composed of a hard tough clay, 
which has worn very gradually for years, by the action of the water; 
and they can easily be preserved in the present form and shape, by a 
cheap protection of stone. The current of this stream is also very 
moderate. The saving in cost between this plan, and that originally 
contemplated, is. very great. 

After crossing Patoka, our line continues crooked and expensive, 
until we approach the Pigeon Summit, except at short intervals, be- 
tween the crossings of the creek. One mile only, before entering 
the deep cut, is cheap. Below Patoka, we first encounter the valley 
of Hurricane Creek, which is 13 chains wide, and 18 feet below bot- 
tom of canal, requiring, in round numbers, 65,000 cubic yards of 
embankment. The surface of low water is 21 feet B. A rectangu- 
lar submerged timber culvert, equal to 10 feet chord, is provided 
tor in the estimates. About one mile below Hurricane, a small 
branch is crossed, having a valley 9 chains long, 7 feet below boltom 



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in 

ofcaMlItiDd r>f ifiag 19,000 atdno yanis dFimktuAmmU Th* 
caWert is 6 feet chord, rectangular. Buck Creek k next encooirtHw 
ed, whose valley is 17 chaitts wide, 13 feet below bottom of eaoaU 
reqairtDff 56,700 cubic 3rards of embankment. Surface of low water 
90 feet 5. A rectangular culvert* equal to 13 feet chord, is estima* 
ted. We next come to Ke^a Greek, whieh is the largest stream croes- 
ad between Patoka and Pigeon Summit. The valley of this stream 
18 43 chains wide, mnd averages about 17 feet below bottom of caaal^ 
requiring 318,000 cubic yank of embankment. Low water surface 
of the creek is 30iM) feet B. A culvert of 18 feet chord, rectangulaft 
b provided. 

The last stream of any importance, we ernes North of P^eot 
Sammit, is Lost Ci-eek. Its valley is 31 chains wide, and 7 feet be« 
low bottom of canal. A plain rectan^lar timber culvert« of. 18 
&etdM>rd, is estimated, and 47,700 cubic yards of embankment are 
lequired. 

Next, in order« comes the Piceon Summit deep cut. This emhra^ 
ces a dbtance of 3 miles and 60 chains, extending from 5 feet cutting 
at one end, to the same at the other. The deepest cutting on the 
summit is 30.30 feet. There are estimated 308,6d8 cubic yards of 
earth excavation, and 16,133 cubic yards of solid sand'Stone rock* 
Nearly the whole of the work embraced in this deep cut was once 
under contract, and 360,000 cubic yards had been estimated to the 
contractors before the State suspended operations. A great many 
soundings were made in this deep cut, hoik with a view to determine 
the quantity of rock, and the quality o( earth excavation, but still it 
most not be supposed that our estimate of the quantity of rock exca« 
vation is absolutely o^rrect The total number of cubic yards of 
material in. the deep cut, has been calculated from cross sedionSb 
accurately, but the proportion of this thai shonld be estimated at 
rock, cannot be determined with certainty, until the earth is stripped 
oSt or great expense incurred, in sounding and digging weUs. A 
conmderable outlay has already been incurred, giving us only a tol^ 
rabb idM in r^ni to thb matter. But I am con vanoed the quantity 
of rock excavation will not finally be found greaier than is now esti* 
mated. 

After getting through the deep cutting at Pigeon Summit, the line 
is run down on the East side of rigeon Creek, and the level kept up 
for the distanff^ of 3} miles, through the Pi^n Creek Reservoir* 
The description of this reservoir, together with sundry calculatioM 
in regard to it* will be ^ven hereafter. Just below the reservoir a 
Lock, of 7 feet lift, is mtroduced, but as it is intmded to raise the 
imrface of the reservoir to 7 feet> At thb lock will lance in lift from 7 
to 10 feet. Lock No. 3, of 6 feet lift, is located 13 chains heiow 
lock No. 3, and 3} miles bek>w the Summit. Lock No. 4, of 8i feet 
lift, is 4} miles below the Summit. Six miles and a quarter below 
the Summit, we cross Snake Run. The surface, at low water of this 

3Dlf 

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««n of le ffeCcboHi. 

8«ven milei M0W tfie Sainmit Lock No. 5, of 7^ ftel Kfv « lo- 
wIm), trod from this poibt the levoi k mainttiDed imtil after cronig 
Smiths Fork, a disunca of about 3 miles. Tbo lurfec^ of wattr in 
amith'a Fork, wfaen wa oTMsad it,*was2.40 foot B, bat this is the pool 
of a Dam on main Pigeon. The bed of the stream is 13^ B. It 
iskKended to crom ibiscroek by m«aas of a limber aixdHMl eoHort of 
tA feat dioid. Lock No. €, of 6 feet Kft, is located 9^ mibs below 
tbe SwDmtt. Ona mile and three fourths below Smith's Pork we 
cross Big Creek: Surface of water 2.50 B, io pool of Dam on main 
Wgeott: bed **( stream 9.9 J B. Thisstream will be caressed by means 
of a small A«fueduct. 

Thirty chains below Big creek. Lock No* 7, of 7 feet lift, is inuo- 
diicedt and at station 81S, thirty tind a half mikos from Patcka Sum- 
mit, we unite with the old work, done by the State. Our amrvey 
^as extmuied dcmn this oM work two miles, to a point a short dis- 
tance betow Pigeon Dam. On the old work, onamila and 10 chains 
Irom its commencement, Lock No. 8, of i.30 feet lift, is located. Oar 
regular sections and estimate extend to stetion 84&, six chains below 
tie last lock. From this point to Evansviite, adiaftancaof 16 mte 
and 73 chains, there is an aggremte estimate made, as tha work to 
be done consists oS clearing <^ die bushes, filling up small breachss 
through the brinks, repairing the puddling, dsc., atout Cukerte^pnttii^ 
m some wa^iu weiia, and building road bridges. Thesis ntl estimated 
to cost $8,773, and i» inchided in the total cost -of oomf^tk^ tbe 
Oanal to EmnsviUe. 

From the South end of Pigeon Summit, the Canal is located on 
ibe east side of Pigeon Creek for the entire distance down, and is of 
a cheap and ^^afa charactet . The lockage is great until the level of 
the plain of Evansville is attained, being 48 one-^tenth foot in a dis- 
tance of 15 miles. This forms an important item in the cost of coa- 
strut^llon. Pains were taken Co get the high water mark at snteable 
points, and it is found necessary in a few cases, for short distances, to 
eiltifnato the embankments of extra height in order to kesip the floods 
out of the Canal. 

The pdrlion of line extending from Petersiborgh to the sonth end 
of Pigeon Summit, exohtsive of the Patoka deepcut Section, piH un* 
der contract in 1848, is estimated to cost $389,301. Lragth 91 
mMas and H chains. 

Prom the South end of Pigeon Summit to Bvansinlle, the estima- 
ted cost is $145,948 including the cost of the Pigeon Creek Reser* 
voir, and att necessary repairs on the Canal once finished by tbs 
Atete. Length S3 miles and 43^ chains. 

Total cost of the entire line, except the Patoka deep cut SectioB, 
let out in 1848, $ftS5,3«». Length 54 miies and Sd chabs. 



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GENBRAL REMARKS. 

Ii^ the commencement ofour Survey, some time was spent in ma- 
king eTaminKtions in relation to the Reservoir heretofore contem- 
plated in the valley of Flat Creek. Its original area was found to 
be 1S9 acres and content 53,948,074 cubic feet. Bv moving the 
bank down the valley 24 chains, the area was increased to 267 acres 
and content to 77,768,425 cubic feet The valley of Flat Creek is 
not at all favorable for a reservoir. It is quite narrow, and falls rapid- 
ly. Including the extra cost of keeping up the level of. the Can^l, 
this reservoir is estimated to cost $12,9^. 

In runnrng the Im^ first, we introduced a lock below Jie Flat 
Greek Reservoir of ^i feet lift, which brought us down to the level 
of Pigeon Summit, but it occurred to me that since a large amount of 
i;vork had been done on Pigeon Strmmil, before the State suspended 
operations, a new question would arise as to the proper level for this 
heavy portion of tlie line. Assuming that it had been originally ad» 
justed correctly before the work was commenced by the State, it 
wfis evident that economy woiM indicate that the level should now 
be depressed. The artificial cut made through the Summit may be 
r^arded by us now, as a natural depression/ and our level shouid be 
90 adjusted as to reduce the heavy embankments on one side, and 
the deep cuts on the other to a mininram in cost. Cross sections 
were taken of the deep cut, and careful comparative estimates made on 
diflbrent leveK'^i^h restated in a saving of $2,000 by depressing the 
level one foot; and upon the new level the estimates are now made. 

Finding the Flat Creek Reservoir so unfavonri[)le,an Mamiiwtion 
was roide fear an eligible rite on the head waiere of Pig^M Creek 
which reeu)ted cuceesBfully. A euilaUe place was found far making 
a bank aeross the valley where its width is onlv SB chains and the 
top water line of the Reservoir surveyed, iachiMng an area of US6 
acres. Ordinates were also run, by which the content of the Raaer*i 
voir, when full, is ascertained with reliable accari^eXi to be 387,814^0 
cubic feet. Its mraximum height will be 7 feet A, and the greatest- 
availnble depth at the bulk head* 10 feet. For a cowsideraDla por- 
tion or the distance around» the banks are abrupt; another poiiion 
has a more.fientle inclination] and a pait of the border is vmy flat. 
A depression of 2 feet will expose 200 acves of land ; a depressioa of 
4 feet will expose 460 acrea; and a depression of 6 feet« 680 acies* 
But around the flat portion of its border there are no settlements, 
and probably never vrtll be. A very small portion of the entiie area 
ia arable land. 

The area of countrvinolining towards, and the drainage of which 
would be caught by the Pigeon Creek Reiservoir, was juMsertained by 
survey to be 14376 acres, eaclosive of the area of the Reservoir. « 
The basis forocring the Pigeon. Creek Reservoir ia remarkably well 
adapted to Uie> retention »of water, being a. tight impervious clay .sqil; 
and the surrounding country is generally high and rolling, in portions 



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18DI 

broken, having abo a clajr soil, is well caledated to drain off into 
the Resenroir, a large proportion of the rain that falls upon iL 

From the Meteorological records kept at Woodward Coll^, Cin- 
cinnali, by Joseph Ray, Esq., I find that the average annual fall of 
rain for the last fifteen years, b 47.5!ii inches, the greatest occur- 
ring in the year 1847, was, 65.18 inches. 

Tl»e next greatest occurring in the year 1849, was* 52.97 inches. 

The least occurring in the year 1839, was 30.62 inches. 

And the next least occurring in the year 1838, was 39.45 inches. 

tn my calculations of the probable available quantity of water to 
be laid up in the Pigeon Creek Reservoir, I have assumed an annual 
fall of rain and snow melted of 35 vertical inches, and that two-fifths 
of this, or 14 vertical inches, would flow into the Reservoir. Thb 
quantity would amount to 755,998,320 cubic feet. I have su|^>osed 
an allowance of 4 feet vertical over a mean surface of the Reservoir 
(1,027 acres) would be an ample allowance for loss by evaporation 
and leakage, considering the peculiar tenacity of the soil. ThiswouM 
amount to 178,944,480 cubic feet, and being deducted from the 
drainage above, would leave a net supply of 557,053^40 cubic feet; 
which would afford 1,097 cubic feet per minute for 12 months. It 
is intended to raise the Reservoir bank 5 feet above top water line. 
It will be 10 feet wide on top, with slopes of 1} to 1 ; and in its cen« 
tre there will be a tight wall of 2 inch oak plank, extending about 3 
feet below the natural surface, and 2 feet above the top water line 
of the Ueservoir. 

There is on the east side of the Reservoir a high point of land 
composed of hard clay, underlaid with soft sand stone rock, at a 
suitable level for the foundations of the Reservoir Culverts, rendering 
the location particularly eligible. From the culverts, a short and 
cheap feeder will lead* the water into the Canal just below the 
Lock. 

At the North end of Pigeon Summit deep cut, a Liock will be put 
in having a lift varying from 1 to S feet; the latter bein£r iu lift when 
the Reservoir is filled to top water line ; and through the Reservoir, 
the embankments are raised to an extra height of S feet to keep them 
at all times above water. The water will 1^ admitted into the Canal 
from the Reservoir by suitable waste weirs, and nt the north end of 
Pigeon Summit, a large water weir will be provided to discharge any 
extraordinary floods that may occur, and the excessive drainaM of 
certain years. It is intended to put in 4 gates 2 feet square for draw- 
ing the water from the Reservoir to fill the Canal, and thesie together 
with the wasto weirs at the North end of the Reservoir, will be am- 
ply sufiicient to discharge unusual floods, nnd prevent the water ri- 
fting higher than is intended. But the Reservoir bank is raised 5 feet 
extra height, and would safely bear a rise of 2 feet, which wookf hold 
half the lai|;est monthly drainage that has occurred during the last 



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m 

15 yettn* Blit it is m>l probabte tha RasenrM* bsnk will ever be ex* 
posed to this extra pressure* and I do not think the extreme oscilit- 
tions in the surface of the water, from the lowest stage in the fall, to 
the highest, probably in July, need exceed six feet* It is intended to 
clear 250 acres of the border of the Pigeon Creek Reservoir, which 
will be alternately covered with wnter, and then exposed to the son, 
and prevent any just oaose of complaint, that the health of the 
coontry has been impaired by floodiag the land. 

The important scAiject of suf^lyiag the Oanal with water, will 
next be examined. 



9 .S 

From Newbury Dam to Maysville the distance is 3S-42 
and at 50 cuVtc feet per minute, will require* • • • 

From Maysville to the North end of Patoka Sum- 
mit, the distance is '• 18-72 

and at 100 cubic feet per mile, will require 

From the North end of Patoka Summit to the 1st. 

lock below, the distance is 2-64 

and at 25 cubic feet per minute, will require* • • • 

From the 1st Lock below Patoka Summit to the 
North end of Pigeon Summit, the distance is* • • • 12-71 
and at 75 cubic feet per minute, will require* • • • 

Prom the north end of Pigeon Summit to the 1st lock 

below the Reservoir, the dbtance is 5-38 

and at 25 cubic feet per roinutet will require* • • • 

Total td this point, 68-47 

From the 1st Lock below the Reserroir to Pigeon 

Bam, the distance is lft-09 

•ad at 50 cubic feet per minute, will require* • • • 

From the Pigeon Dam to Evansville the distance is 18-24 
and at 50 cubic feet per minute, will require* • * • 

Sum, ' 31-3S 

Distances and cabic feet brought down, <3-47 

Total distance to Evansville, and cubic feet required, 95-00 






1,176 

1,890 

TO 

953 

136 



4,335 



655 
915 



1,570 
4,296 



5,795 



It will be seen that the distance from Newbary Dam to tha 
South end of Pigeon Reservoir, is 64 miles and 6 chains, and the es* 
ttiMtied aapply of watar reqwad* 4|338cuMeiisetpar muittte. Prom 
the PweoB ttesanrofar to Pinon Cnsek feeder iMm, the distance is 
13 niMs aad 9 ohaias, and ma estinatsd supply of water required je 



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fft5 bufaie feet per arimito. Fh>in tho Vijgmm Fbader Dam to Bvam- 
▼Hle» the distance is 18 miles and S4 dnuns* reqairing 915 cnbic Teet 
of water per mtirate. 

For the supph'^ of the line from Newbury Dam to the South end 
of the Pigeon Reservoir, there is a great superabundance of water, 
fomhhed by White River, and ttiere cannot be the least difficulty in 
iending forward an simple supply, considering the peediarly impervi- 
ous chancter of the soil, and also the enburj^Bsnent (»f tho Canal to5 
fint depth of water, to near MaysriUe, anid M ieet depths to the 
south end of Patoka Summit ; and the current, with the inereased 
capacity, will be so moderate as not to impede navigation. 

jProm the Pigeon Dam toEvansville, it may be safely assumed that 
the Pigeon Feeider will supply the line for eight months in the year. 
To supply this portion of the line during the remaining four months^ 
and the portion from the Reservoir to the Dam, during tho whole 
year, would require 502,380,000 cubic feet, or 955 cubic ieetper min- 
ute; which amount the Pigeon Reservoir will furnish. 

It was intended to embrace ail the line from Petersburg to the 
South end of Patoka Summit in the Petersburg Division, but it is 
deemed proper, owing to the nature of the recent contracts, to in- 
clude all the line South of Petersburg, except the Patoka deep cut 
9$ctionf let in 1848, in the EvansviUe Division. This Division wOl 
therefore be 54.62 miles long, embracing all the work let to Messrs 
Forrer & Co., including the finishing of the old line to EvansviUe, 
and is estimated to cost, at contract prices^ $561,341 59, indudiog 
about 5 per cent, for contingencies. 

The following Table will show the general results of our operations 
io^he 

CONSTRUCTION OF THE CANAL. 



s»: 



Dt?18l6N8. 



Uncth 
ia. 



Cost CrMk, 

Set ^iTtr, 
Newfteny, - 

Pftenbpra* 

£faxitviUe, 



^timf |e of 
toMCosI* 



Am't paid for eon- 
itmsdoaiBdsdiaf 
dauMifM by flooda, 
dto and all expenaei 
toop*iigofiiaTig*ii. 



S6.76 
43.09 
17.01 
23.14 
16.85 
54^ 



$348,665 05 
973,631 11 
167,875 00 
168,787 » 
347,313 39 
535,950 74 



190.47 , $1,841,499 40 



371,674 16 
983,785 93 
139,495 01 
95,560 80 
170,048 05 



$1,053,493 95 



Probable 
amooMiret 
t» boywd. 



35,449 99 

7S;»6 40 

177,165 97 

561,341 SO 



Ttobabto OMoTtheirliololiiM tttm Cod OMek iU» Bnmavltta, 



847,163 95 
1,053,493 95 

$1,900,676 50 



NotiH-Under the head of ConMiruetmih thme is» of eomss^ n^ohiii^ 
itiehided^ except tfae amount paid coBtiaotoraor anitsv on tha Rest* 
doDl Safineer'ft Certifieala for wofk<kitie^ Aere being •» odier ac- 
counts kept in the Engineer's Office. 



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From an inspection of the foregoing Table, it woald seem to be 
probablo* that tfae Eaj^neer'a estsmales woqU not be fiiUy realiaetf. 
It will be seen thai ihe actual paymeiit on the Goal CuediL Diviebn, 
exceeds the estimate some i|^3,0(M)t and. the Eel River Di visioQ aiiDUt 
$10^000. The Newberry, Maysvillo and Peterbuif; Divisions are 
stili put down at the Engineer's estimate, but upon each of these Di- 
visioiui there is work remaiqitgtp l^de^e, and it is impossible to. 
foresee what difficulties may m encountered in this work, or what 
damages may be sustained on sections already completed and receiv- 
ed. Sefore these kin<ls of difficulties were encountered on the Coal 
Creek and Eel River Divisions, there was a reasonable prospect of . 
the work beieg completed willlin the esttinaiefc. 

We have.be^ laboring under another embarnMBOiial* which wsls 
adverted to in my last report^ vjat the great adasaceaa the wa|^:di' 
common labor. When the estimates were made, upoa which mostcff 
our original ea)culations are based, commeti labor eecikl h^ readBlj^ 
obtained for $12 00 per month, but siace the Trustees kaVe covt 
menced ope^atiatts^lal>or hoe advanced to $3 J 00 per foealii; fasinj;; 
an inoremfe of nearly 75 per cent. The effect of this great appreci- 
ation in the wages of labor, has haenf to induoe an abandoDmeet ofa 
great many sections put under eontraot ai the firat lettingsy maUng 
it necessary to n^t them at higher priees. Moreover, many of [the 
contractors^ Hvorkiig under the impression- that they wooll^ ekM' 
make nothingy or lose money, have conducted their business in such 
manner as to render It almost impossible to have the work faithfully 
done, and in some cases we have been compelled to take charse of 
sections before they were completed, in order to prevent serious dam-* 
age to the Canal. 

Under these circuinfl|li^praeS| it couU no^ befeppected, that the orig- 
inal estimates would be fuUy realized. The deficiency would have 
been very much greater, if several iniportunt changes in the location 
and plans of the Canal had not -been made, by wnich its cost has 
been materially reduced. On the other hand, it should be observed, 
that the estimates now reported, having beni':made ^ tte Mhrent 
periods when the work was let ont^ oorrespeod with the tlm advan- 
cing prices, ted dt it believed the* wages, ef labor, and tb^priees ot 
provbions, will not get mudiMgher Iban they wens whisn tlmJlk^ 
tersburff and Evansville Divisions were ^ut up j er odnlraet: atieasi, 
it is, I Uiink, safe to assluiie that the amount added into the estioMtes 
for contingencies, varyiag frdm 5 to 10 per cent, wil be ediiBlete 
to cover the cost of any extm work that asay be en^oikitered. ^hb 
Evansville Division having been let toa fatgidy reByortsibleeeaipelayi, 
at liberal prices, there iml be ao re4eUiiqp> nor it it- apffeeheaded 
there nfill be any dIBcuUv in having every part of the work faithful- 
ly and promptly executed. 

Respectfully submitted : 

WM. J. B\LL, 
Retiiemt Engineer. 



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IM 



aUtUmttU of Receipts and DMwrsemenis iy the Boanl if TmMm^ 
' tk€ Wabash and Erie CmuU, from the let dayef December, 1849, 
iathe 1st dmycf December, 1850. 



RECEIPTS. 
From what sources. 

JBalance on hand 1st Deeembar, 1849,. • • 385;il7 69 

T«lb and watwranti, 160,632 8S 

Lands aaat and watt •f Tippecanoe,* • • • 56^90 91 

Lands in Y taoennes District, 52,983 76 

bondholder's subscription, 2,750 00 

biterest on Deposltes in New York, and 

Etchange, 12^490 94 

There has also been received for hmds east 

and west of Tippecanoe in scrip east — 

principal $5,698 79, interast #1311 44, 7,510 33 
In scrip west, 4i885 00 



670,666 1) 



12,895 23 



DISBURSEMENTS. 
On what occmmL 

fleneral expenses, ksMinff salaries of 
. Trustees and Clerics, tmvdling and of* 
. iBeexpeaseB,prinliiq[,advertisiiw, die, j^l,387 4li 
Oadiaarjr Bepain of Canal,* • 31,575 63 
JBstraordinary Bepaira of Ca« 

nal, * • 14,650 84 

Bebuildiog Bridges, 2,782 74 

fizpense of Superintendence, . 5,866 69 
Sdnriee and ofiee eipenses of 

Qolleolen^ . §,884 26 

60,729 60 



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m 

MutnietioD, Co«l Croek to 

TerreHtote, 90308 95 

DDstniction, Terre Haute t») . ^ __ 

Point Cbmmeroe, 63,973 87 

Diutniction,Pouit Commerce 

to Newberry, ^,503 03 

wistruction, Newberry to ^^.^. , 

Maysrille, 77^15 15 

}n8truction, Ma^sville south, 141,157 55 

xpense of Engineerm loca- ...^ ,, 

tlng,&c...... 15,183 11 

mount paid for Damage*, 

water-power, Ac.. ^''^ ^ 367.095 45 

Kpense of Land Office* Logansport,- • • • 2,680 19 
cpeoM of Xtand Office, Washington,- • • 903 02 

teres! paid subscribers to advance of 

tSOOOUO 48,811 75 

•^•"^^ J 501,557 47 

— r 

ilanee on band Ist December, 1850,- • r . . 169.108 65 



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Summary tiatefnent of Receipts and DMursements hf the Rmari nj 
TruMees of Wabash and Erie Canals from the commenerwtaU rf 
the Trust to the 1st day of DooembeTf 1^. 



RECEIPTS. 
From what sources. 

Tolls and wafer rants, 530,454 97 

Lands east and west or Tippecanoe,* • • 346,473 15 

Lands in Vincennes District, 197,988 41 

Bondholder's advance, with Interest and 

Exchange, 859,498 09 

1,834,418 e 

Of thb amount there has been received 

in scrip, in payment for lands at the 

Loganspoit office, as follows: 
Scrip east of Tippecanoe-* 

Principal, $83,988 74 

Interest, 17,440 57 

100,439 31 

Scrip west of Tippecanoe, 49,015 00 

149^444 31 

Amount received up to December 1st, 
1850,in cash, 1,684,969 31 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

On what account. 

General Expenses of the Trust, Ordi- 
nary and Extraordinary Repairs of 
the Canal, Bridges, Superintendence, 

collection. Land offices, d^., 978,336 17 

Constructbn of Canal. 1,134,149 87 

Interest to Bondholders, 103,384 63 

1,515^60 « 

Balance of cash on hand 1st Decem- 
ber, 1850, 169,108 65 



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m 



■i 



¥ 



i 

I 



i 
i 



t 
i 



i 






I 



I 



89S8S: 



S9SSS 






8 






SS98S 



!l 



80S88 



8E:86 







'J^S 



o-g 



1 ni 


i:C9|s 

liil 


1 88f 

1 


&r8 8 

■III 1 


( S8£ 

1 «ij 


III J 

if!a8 8 




ises a 


8 KSK 

i «fi 


!8S8 S 


1 ■=« 


:S88 8 




PI 


IP 




• • 

1 ]i 

1 111 


1 



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188 



Statement showing the 
revenue from the Wabash 
of the Trust* 



its of toll and waUr-renis^ and mu 
Erte Canal since the < 





Ot0ss r§- 


MmP9IU€^ 


p€ir0. 


fTfrtpmirs. 


JTHnum. 


Ptrtof 1817, 


7S,3B9| 
148448 98 
134,8»09 

U7,i8ea8 


0484 
4^84111 
8,t43 88 
5,884 90 


11,900 90 
84,883 84 
40,5»88 
37,408 » 


0,188 « 
13,14167 
33,84188 
17,383 88 


spas 

tme 

9Lm% 


tajtii 


SS 


SS;::::;:::::: 



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1S9 



Statemeni of the Amount of Tolls recehed Jrom the Local Trade and 
Exports^ the Cincinnati hnports^ and the Toledo Imports^ at the 
colkdor^B o^Ice at Fort Wayne^ Ind^^from the opening of nova- 
tion on the 18/A March^ to the SOT* mnemier, 1850, inclurive^ and 
the relative proportion which each beare to the other and to the whole 
amount of toUs collected. 



ThefToledo Imports to the Ciacianati Imports are as* • 3 6-7 to I 
The Toledo Imports to the Local Trade and Exports 

are as 7| to I 

The Cincinnati Imports, I^cal Trade and Exports 

are as • 3 to 1 

The total tolls to the Toledo Imports are as 1 3-5 to 1 

The total tolls to the Cincinnati Imports are as 5i to 1 

The total tolls to the Local Trade and Exports are as* 10 3-5 to 1 

O. r. MORGAN, Collector, 
Fort Wayne. 



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StmkM0ni of the qmaniky cfkmd§ $oU, at the Lemi Cgjice at Wmk- 
ingioMf of the lands tn the Ftucemne* DUtricif from the iM isjf 
0f December, 1849, to the 20th day of November, IS50, buh b- 
chisive, with the purchase monty therefor. 



M»9lU. 


\9i CU»9, 


U Clua». 


UCUuM. 


T»Ul Mr€», 


ekmstn^M^ 


8. 


380 75 M31 18 
48141 1,843 58 
9U 10 1,834 83 
554 31 1,190 00 
668 91 1 9,138 79 
188 00 i 1,001 53 
584 88 . 1,079 84 
8800 40000 
980 00 1,166 87 
978 19 1,343 13 
1,105 88 1,600 89 
817 58 9,361 45 


10158 
900 46 
943 08 
180 38 
983 15 
194 81 
160 00 
40 00 
31168 


1,793 45 
9,545 45 

9,998 79 
1,873 70 
3,088 15 
1,978 34 
1,817 00 
988 00 
1,798 55 
1,89138 
9,918 80 
3,384 87 


3,S86M 
5.H1S 
4J05a 
3,875 81 
•JSiil 

4jmt! 

1,805 • 

3^!3 
84fl» 
















fO,« 




190 00 
365 04 


io;:::::::: 




5,499 38 


) 17.016 79 


9,198 11 


95488 99 


098JB3X 



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ft. 

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I 






t888888S8 



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3?88888S:aM8 






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193 



SrATBinrr ih Hsi«Anoii to the Sceif East and Wsst of TtmKA* 

NOB, 'EUSDWOMMD BT THB BOABD OF TmVFnoah UP TO THE ItT Db*- 

cauBB, 1850. 

BA9T OF TIPPBCANOB. 

The imount of Scrip outstandlog at date of Auditor's 
report of November 3, 1846, is stated by him to be $53,590 83 

In report of Auditor of State of NoTomber 5, 1847, 
the amount outstanding is stated then to be about 67,000 60 

And in his letter to Trustees of 13 November 1847, at 66,607 51 

After a settlement made by the Resident Trustee and 
Auditor in May, 1849, the amocnt outstanding at 
the commenoement of the Trust is stated at 80,037 18- 

Of which the Trustees had redeemed and paid over to 
the Treasurer of State, up to that time, 66,880 07 

Leaving balance outstanding, '• 13^47 11 

All of which had been issued for Canal purposes, enpept f3,666y 
which had been paid out for the Northport Feeder Dam. 

The Trustees have redeemed of scrip, in prtndpal, the sum of 
982,988 74, being an excess over the sum psported by the Auditor 
to be outstanding at the passage of the State Debt Act ef #10387 9i ^ 
and over the amount fixed upon as outstanding at the settJeneiit wiih» 
the Auditor in May, 1849, of $3,751 56, and there is slitl prohaMjp 
some of this scrip nnredeemed; 



OP TtPngCANOK* 

Of this scrip thsfle was staAsd to be outsteodkig at the 
date of the Auditor^ report^NovmiberS, 1846, tho 
sam of about* * $130,475 OQi 

On the 6th November, 1847, the Auditor report* the 
amount then outstanding at 8333a Oa 

At the settlement in May, 1849, the Auditor reports 
the amount outstanding, aitor deduoting the amount 
redeemed by the Trustees up to that time, $fit473B,. 
at 33^0e»0ft 

Since then tbssa has been redeemed by tha Tru»^ 
tees, the sum of • 94,380 00* 

Laaving % balanaB yet outstanding, of • $8,755 OO 

2D90 .. ■ - 



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194 

WiLLiiiMSPORT, May 25, 18S0. 
Gbntumek: Our citizens having concluded that the side-cut opposite 
this place would not soon be constructed through your agency, have or- 
ganized a company lor that purpose, subscribed stock, and caused 
surveys and estimates to be made. From these estimates and sur- 
veys it appears that, to construct with the means within their reach, 
it must be on a plan and route which would not be selected if their 
means were greater. Fully intending, however, to let it on contract 
by the middle of June, and finding their means thus circumacribed, 
and knowing that you represent interests to be afiected, they bate 
directed me to address you upon the subject, and ascertain how 
you felt disposed in the matter, and whether you would aid in the 
construction of the work, by an advance of funds, looking in return 
to receive a release from the L^islature of the liability which rests 
on the W. and E. Trust fund. To obtain this equivalent, they be- 
lieve their efforts and agency would be of much efficiency, inaamudi 
B^ they represent 150 stockholders (land holders all of them) whose 
aggregate interest in the benefits to be derived from the side-cot by 
whomsoever constructed^ is as great as any others, and very probably 
greater than all others. In what manner you might prefer to render 
this aid, whether in the light of a donation to the company to assome 
your liability, or of a subscription to the stock, would be for you to 
decide, if the proposition meets with your approbation at all. 

Aware that the time is short, in which to hear from you, and de* 
sirous of so far explaining matters that a first conclusion might not 
be afterwards revei*sed on a further development, a little detail will 
not be out of place. The amount of funds at the command of the 
company is $15,000, and is sufficient to make the work on one roote 
by locking down at the canal; another route and one on which the 
level of the canal would be maintained to the river, would cost about 
$122,000 or $33,000; the latter is the one the Board wish to select, 
and to construct a work permanent and substantial as its importance 
demands. They believe you have been misinformed as to the impor- 
tance of this work, and that it will bring to your canal produce, and 
particularly corn, which would otherwise never touch it; it makes 
the entire west side of, the Wabash down to Perrysviile, plaxMS of 
depot, where canal boats may take in loads and then re-enter the 
canal. Farmers in Illinois, 90 miles off, subscribe to this stock ; there 
is nothing men see so clearly as their own interest 

I have laid the matter befom you, gentlemen Trustees, and leave 
it for your decision. 1 have but one request to make: that, decide as 
you may, you will make known your decision in time to alter our 
plin, if such should he the result. 

With much respect, I remain your obedient servant, 

WM. R. BOYER, Sec. 

To Hon. GHAKiiEs Butlxr, 
A. M. Pdbtt, 
Thomas Dowuife, 

Trustees cf W, Sf E. Cmal 



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Id5 



Trustee's Office, Wabash and Erie Camal, } 
Terre Haute, June 8, 1^50. \ 

Sir: — Your communication, under date of May 25th, has been re* 
ceived, and at once submitted to the consideration of the Board. 

I am instructed to say, that, believing as they do, a side-cut, if 
constructed from the Wabash and Erie Canal to the river opposite 
Williamsport, as proposed by you, cannot be supplied with water 
from the canal, without injury to the navigation, it would be obvi- 
ously improper, therefore, in the Trustees to entertain any proposition 
for its construction. 

It is due to you, and to the interests of the State confided to us, 
that we should advise you of what we conceive to be our duty. 
You are thererfore hereby notified, that we shall resist any attempt on 
your part to divert any water from the Canal for the purpose of 
supplying your side-cut, as it will seriously affect the navigation on 
the main-line of the canal. 

Very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

THOMAS DOWLING, 

ResidejU Trusiee't 
Wm. R. Boysr, Esq., 

Secrttary of the Williamsport Canal Lock Company, 

WiBiamspoi'tt Ind. 



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197 



StatemenZ of aU articles clear^ at Fori Wayne an the Wixbash and 
Erie Canals from the commencemeTU to the close of navigation in 
the years 1849 and 1850. 



JtrticUs. 



•▲K^BLl. 



Ale vad Beer, 

Beer, 

Cider, 

Flour, 

Fish, fieth water,. 
Pith, salt water,.. 
Lime, common,.... 
Ume, Hydraulic, . 

Oil, Unseed, 

Oil, Uid, 

Oil. Corn, 

Pork,,.... 

Salt, Vine 

Salt, coarse, 

Whitkcy. 

Spirits, domeatic.. 
Tar, 



Vinegar, , 

Gieen Apples, . 
Cnabernes, ... 



Barley, 

Beans, 

Corn, 

Coal, mineral, 

Coke 

Oats, 

PoiUtoee 

Rye, 

Seeds, timothy and clover, . 

Seeds, flax 

Wheat 



Animate, other than live hoKe.- 

Btttter, rr... 

Banage and Furniture 

Bacon and Pork in bulk 

Beeswax, 

Cheese,... 

Coffee.! 

Coidage, 

Cotton Tame, 

Candles, 

Clocks, 

Crockery 

Dyestufls, 

R«», 

Fruit, dried, 

Fun and Peltries, 

Feathers 

Ginseng and other roots, 

Glass and Glass-ware, 

t'rindstones, 

<^yi>sum, 

Hides and Skins 

Hair 

Hemp, 

Hon, live, 

Iron, pig, 

lion, bar 

Iron, cast, 



1860. 



345 

113 
160 

3,870 
460 
18 
S81 
351 
1S3 
11 

1,278 
63,355 

0,959 

S,961 
437 
305 
308 
705 
831 



3,318 
963 

i8,r«5 

3,387 
5,559 
1,591 
4,070 
8,803 
1,198 
730 
996,711 



99,900 
107,095 
990,849 

56,814 



190,511 

1,308,754 

34,889 

86,411 

36 679 

5,875 

434.627 

18,813 

9,804 

:83.587 

183,668 

1,146 

96,843 

370,831 

206,646 

65,800 

16.905 

708 

7,678 

491,983 

767,754 

905,560 

1,876,118 



1840. 



35,8^5 

8338 

149 



333 
3,707 

53,080 

8,816 



393 

104 

35,831 

6,740 



178 



15 



) 1590 
i 143,705 



136,793 
838,831 
809,688 
61,535 
143,181 
1,145,000 



830,438 



361,588 
"4,666* 



s. 



104,993 



T^tne.iaSO. 



90 

89 
8,475 

578 



58 
884 

10,007 
5S9 
It 
45 
69 
110 
104 



100 

8 

514 

133 
111 
96 
140 

78 



71s«e,lOlO. 



9,777 
335 
87 



50 
649 

493 



18 
6 

793 
970 



58 
6,801 



U 

S3 

465 

88 



95 
654 

17 
43 
18 

3 
217 

9 

1 

18 
61 

1 

48 

185 

103 

33 

8 



4 
346 
384 
458 
938 



50 
4,314 



410 

105 

31 

78 

573 



115 



186 



sai 



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198 



Siaiemenl of articles dewred at Fart Wayme — CaUinmed. 



jirtUUs, 



, 7VM.]89k . 7kw,0«. 



twuier.' 



LMd,Ur, 

litk«rf» 

MMCkitttTJ 

MillstoDM 

MolAMM 

IfcrckaodiM 

If arMe, oo-wroagkt, . 
MatbU, wroaght, .... 

JIall* *jMl cpikes, 

ffstf 

Polter*f wftie, 

Powder. 

Pot and pearl a^hea,. . 
Papar 



Klec, 

Salarataa,. 
Skot. 



Soap 

SUrch, 

Sacar, 

Tallow 

Tobacco, leaf, 

Tobacco, manufactured, . 

Wool 

Wood-ware 

Weal- India fruit, 

White lead, 

Wa^ona 

Miacellaneoua, 



MIICKLLAKKOOt. 



Brlcka, number, 

Barrelc, empty, number, 

Brooma number, 

Hoop-polea, number, 

Lathi, number 

ShlngleB, number 

Staveaand headlDga, number, . 

Stone, percbog 

Lumber, feet, 

Timber, feet, 

Wood, cordi, 

Bhiof le boUi, cordi, 



Mtlaa travelled,. . 
MilM Boatinta.. 



nSt* 



163 

433,199 

73J0O9 

7M,518 
6,5024a5 

35,025 
394«590 
705.056 

33,371 
177,198 

37,897 
781.936 

»,807 

75,ff75 
145,271 
103,163 

12,219 

12,919 

4.155 

911,857 

1,430 

85.806 
370,107 

19,715 
130^4 

12.605 
116,497 
209,109 
523,908 



7,050 

5,375 

8,855 

591,931 

26L400 

3,730,850 

877,665 

3,002 

1,481.678 

80.970 

3,072 

1 



683,835 

227,087 



176,198 

M9,497 



175 < 
4 . 



1,7«5JM4 

27DJD19 

1,103.138 

7.135,805 



217 

3V 

377 

3,951 



3JSK 



96,693 
1J06,«2 


UB 

17 

88 

19 

391 

98 

38 

79 

52 

6 

6 

9 

456 

1 

43 

185 

10 

65 

6 

58 

135 

989 

11 
54 

4 

501 

44 

550 

486 
6,184 

7,680 

9 


HB 
SS3 


I55;5W 


•X 


977,495 


« 


46,757 


s 


38818 


IS 






**V,Soi38" 




sit 







413,117 


9» 


100,461 
200,402 
100,698 
230,129 
1,49],S]4 












588,788 

147,000 

3,114,000 


41 

«7 


3,031 
1,358,655 




2,985 

519,336 
909,088 


7^ 


54,501 


«JB38 



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199 



Statement of all articles arrived at Fort Wayne, on the Wabash 
and Erie Canal, from the commencement to the close of navigation, 
in the year 1850. 



ArtieUs. 



AV. 



T»n*. 



.ArticUt, 



JV«. 



T»na, 



Corn, 

Cot! 

Coke, 

Poutow,., 
Bye.. 



Orutieed, 

Plueeed 

Wheat 

Um«,(commoD) 



Ale nd beer,. 



CMer 

Floor 

yreeh water fleh,. 
Salt water flih,... 
Hydrwllc lime,.. 

Liaieedoll, 

Urt oil,. ........ 

Pork 

Piae lait,. 



'jwteBalt, 

Whiikey... 

Other demertUiplriU. 



i'lMgw, 

Green apiOee,. 
CreaberriM, . 



Anintli (domestic) other 

»^".'!'.'!°r:;::;;::::; 

Extra baiyage and liinii- 
Hire 

Bjeontadporkiibuik.;;! 



^«ton yarns.. 

^Jockg,... 
Crockerr,.;.;; 
Syeetuft 



te.^'!^« 

eij^^Swiother'riiiJu;;; 
SK»ndglae.wtte.... 

*Tp«ttm,.... ;;;;;; 



63 

25 

40,836 

652 

3,784 

90 

80 

74 

960 

6 



8 

1 

1,146 

SI 

76 

1 

1 

9 

7 



88 


a 


5,173 


150 


90 


1 


191 


33 


4 


1 


151 


26 


380 


41 I 


781 


117 


135 


20 


JOO 


15 


45 


7 


45 


7 


6 


1 


10,531 


1,185 


793 


81 


479 


84 


53 


9 


88 


13 


145 


35 


675 


81 


1 




3;i50 


2 


168 


. 


414,965 


m 


33,463 


17 


99,389 


15 


310,883 


160 


5,709 


3 


18,578 


9 


8,767 


4 


460 




131,994 


61 


9,163 


1 


900 




18,571 


8 


17,594 


9 


54 




5,129 


3 


128,704 


64 


64,282 


33 


14JM 


1 

1 



. Hidea end ekiae, 

I Hemp, 

live hogs, 

2f8». 

Rice, 

' Pigiron 

Bar Iron 

I Cast iron, 

! Lard 

Leather, (sole and other). 

Bar lead, 

Machinery, 

Millstones, 

Molasses 

Merchandise, 

Marble (wrought) 

Marble, (on- wroogfat) .... 

Nails and spikes, 

Nuts 

Potter's ware, 

Powder,.... 

Pot and pearl ashes, 

Paper 

Salaratus 

Shot 

Soap , 

Starch, 

Sugar 

Tallow 

Leaf tobacco 

Manufactured tobacco, . . . 

Wood, 

Wood- ware 

West- India ftoit, , 

White lead 

Wagons >. , 

Miscellaneous, 



1,»1 


1 


7,679 


4 


150.178 


75 


615 




97357 


U 


336,489 


168 


357,553 


179 


496,480 


246 


5.348 


3 


95,406 


48 


3,129 


9 


96,790 


49 


14,400 


7 


966,604 


133 


13^7,330 


904 


9,280 


5 


75457 


98 


390,594 


160 


9,974 


5 


91,905 


11 


535 


3 


22,959 


11 


29,437 


15 


7,579 


4 


2,740 


1 


5,847 


3 


1,419 


1 


340,743 


170 


1,430 


1 


81,387 


41 


124,135 


09 


353 

33,937 




17 


2.450 




33,649 


i7 


38,477 


16 


167,990 


84 



Bricks 

£mpty barrels, 

Brooms 

Hoop poles, 

Shingles, 

Staves and headings 

Stone, perches 

Lumber, fbet, 

Timber, feet, 

Wood, cords, 

Shingle bolts, coidv 

Agricultural Implements, 
pounds 



No. of passengers, 

No. of miles travelled, . 
No. of miles boats run,. 



7,050 


7 


35 




3,494 
9.100 


i 


960,250 


71,600 


19S 


3,079 


6,158 


266,130 


361 


84,443 


9.533 


2395 


7338 


1 


S 


138394 


69 




22,789 


3,419 




194383 




30,178 





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196 



Statement of articles cleared at Fort Wayne— Continued. 



jirtieUs. 



18S0. 



1849. 



7Viu,18». 



TnM.lBO. 



LmA, 

Uather, 

Lead, bftT, 

Uttaargs 

Machinery, 

Mlll-stonet, 

MoUiMt. 

MerchandiM, 

Marble, on •wroaghl. 

Marble, wrought, 

Naita and apikea, , 

Kuti 

Potter'f ware, 

Powder. , 

Pot and pearl aahes, 

E*P«r, 

RiCa, 

Wee 

Salaratui, 

Shot 

Soap, 

Starch, 

Sugar 

Tallow, 

Tobacco, leaf, 

Tobacco, manufactured, 

Wool, 

Wood-ware, 

Weatlndia (Iriiit 

White lead 

Wagona 

Miacellaneoua, 

wnctLLAnwovu, 

Bricks, number, 

Barrel!, empty, number, 

Brooma number, 

Hoop-polea. number 

Lathf, numW, 

Shingles, number, 

Staves and headings, number, 

Stone, perches, 

Lamber, feet, 

Timber, feet, 

Wood, cords 

Shingle bolts, cords, 

Milee travelled 

Miles Boats run. 



70,914 

350,789 

7,889 

163 

433,190 

73,009 

754,018 

e,909,»5 

35,985 
304,590 
705,056 

33,376 
177,198 

37,897 
781,956 

55,807 

75,675 
145,971 
109,163 

18,819 

13,919 

4.155 

911,857 

1.430 

85,806 
370,197 

19.715 
130,644 

18,605 
116,497 
869,108 
583,908 



7,050 

5,375 

8,855 

591,981 

86L400 

3,730,850 

377,665 

3,093 

1,481,678 

80.9r70 

3,073 

1 



683335 

827,087 



176,)0S 
849,407 



1,705JM4 

870,010 

1,103.138 

7,135,835 



906,003 
1,106,083 



I55A78 
'577*405' 



46,757 
*38.*848' 



1,090.138 



413,117 



100,461 
209,408 
100,698 
830,189 
],49]4»4 



588,789 

147,000 

3,114,000 



3,031 
1,358,655 



519,330 
909,988 



35 

175 

4 



917 

37 

377 

3,951 

18 

158 

358 

17 

88 

19 

391 

98 

38 

79 

58 

6 

6 

9 

456 

1 

43 
185 
10 
65 
6 
58 
135 
968 



11 
54 

4 

501 

44 

559 

486 

6,184 

2^593 



US 

sa 



m 

SS3 



78 

"iV 



51« 



» 

lU 
74S I 



59 

41 

4(7 



8JB7 



7,680 
8 



7,3r 



54,591 



44J» 



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199 



Statement of all articles arrived at Fort Waynes on the Wabash 
and Erie Canals from the commencement to the close of navigation^ 
in the year 1850. 



jfreieiM. 



Jfo. 



Tons. 



JirtieUa, 



JV«. 



r«M. 



Bwi«y 

Bhbi, 

Coin, , 

Cotl, 

Coke 

Me.1, 

Ott« , 

PoUlow , 

Rye...... 

Gnnieed, 

PUxaeed, 

Whett 

Ume, (common) 



85 

40,836 

658 

3,784 I 

80 

80 



BAIIBLS. 



Ale and beer 

Beef, 

Cider 

Plow, 

Preih vUerfiih,., 
Salt water fiih.... 
RydrwiUc Ume,.., 

Laieedoil, 

Urtoli,... 

Pork. 

Pine Hit,. 



•o*r«eitlt, 

Whiikey,... 

ether domeetietpirits. 



Vinegir, 

Green apples,. , 
Cranberriee, .. 



Animali (dormcetlc) other 

^tktn lire how, 

Butter, ,,\ 

Extra baggago and ftimi 
tore, 

jMontBdporkiiibolk.... 

Cneeie, 

Coflbe, 

Cordage, !!!!!!!!...! 

Cotton yarns ', 

Candles,....; 

Clocki 

Crockery 

jTertuffs 



Sped fruit 

Jwj and peltries 

wneeogtnd other rooU.. 

Glaaa and glassware 

gludatones 

•rpaam, , . 



8 

1 

1,146 

21 

76 

1 

1 



74 


8 


860 


7 


5 




88 


3 


5,173 


150 


80 


1 


181 


33 


4 


1 


151 


86 


380 


41 


781 


117 


135 


20 


JOO 


15 


45 


7 


45 


7 


6 


1 


10,531 


1,185 


788 


81 


470 


84 


53 


9 


88 


13 


145 


25 


675 


81 


1 




3,;i50 


2 


168 




414,865 


207 


33.463 


17 


89,360 


15 


318,883 


160 


5,709 


3 


18,578 


9 


8,767 


4 


400 




181,994 


61 


84tt3 


1 


800 




18,571 


8 


17,584 


9 


54 




5,189 


3 


188,704 


64 


64;>83 


38 


14»5 


1 



Hides and skins, 

Hemp, 

Live hogs, 

5ff»» 

, Rice, 

I Pigiron 

Bar iron, 

I Cast iron, 

1 Lard, 

Leather, (sole and other). 

Bar lead, 

Machinery 

Millstones, 

Molasses 

Merchandise, 

Marble (wrought) 

Marble, (un- wrooght) . . . . 

Nails and spikes, 

Nuts, 

Potter's ware, 

Powder 

Pot and pearl ashes, 

Paper 

Salarttus 

Shot 

Soap 

Starch, 

Sugar 

Tallow 

Leaf tobacco 

Manufactured tobacco, . . 

Wood, 

Wood- ware ,. 

West-India ftoit, 

White lead, 

Wagons i». 

Miscellaneous, 



1.881 

7,678 

150,176 

615 

87.857 

336,489 

857,553 

496,480 

5,348 

85,468 

3,188 

98,790 

14,400 

866,604 

1,807330 

9,820 

75457 

380,584 

9,974 

81,305 

535 

88,858 

89,437 

7,579 

8,740 

5,347 

1,419 

340,743 

1.430 

81387 

184,125 

333 

33,gS7 

3.450 

33,049 

38,477 

167.890 



svutn. 



Bricks 

£mply barrels, 

Brooms.. 

Hoop poles 

Shingles, 

Staves and headings, 

Stone, perches 

Lomber.fbet, 

Timber, feet, 

Wood, cords 

Shingle bolts, coids 

Agricultural Implements, 
pound* 



No. of passengers, 

No. of miles travelled, .. 
No. of miles boats run,. . 



1 

4 
75 



14 

168 

179 

848 

3 

48 

8 

49 

7 

133 

904 

5 

38 

160 

5 

11 

3 

It 

15 

4 

1 

3 

1 

170 

1 



17 



17 
16 

84 



7,050 


7 


35 




3,494 


5 


9.100 


800,850 


3» 


71,600 


186 


8,079 


6,158 


806,180 


361 


84,443 


8,533 


8,895 


7,838 


1 


3 


138,694 


69 




88.789 


3,419 




'ti^ 





Digitized by 



Google 



aoD 



Statement of^ all articles cleared at LaOrOt on the Wt^nsh and Erie 
Canals front the comnuncement to the dose of navigation, is the 
years 1849 and 1850. 



«frt<cto«. 



1850. 



7Vm, 1850. 



2VW.1BA 



BMf 

CJAbt, 

Flih, fiTMh water, . 

FliHJr, 

P©rk 

SftU, 



"Wiaskey, 

fteirits, domortic, 

vijiecar 

Green Apples,.... 

Cr«]ibeniea, 

Oil, , 



Btfley,. 



Corn, 

Meel, 

<Hte, 

Bye. 

PoUtoea, 

Seeds, timotlir end cIoTer, . 

Seeds, flax, 

Goal, miaeral, 

Wheat, 



AjBimals otber Uui live hogs,. 

Butter, 

Ban age and ftimiUire 

Bacon and pork in bnlk, 

Ckeese 

Coffee, 

Ooidage, 

Crockery. 

Bggs 

Pniit, dried, 

Pars and peltries, 

Feathen 

Qlnsencaad other roots, 

Glass and glass-ware^ 

Hides and skins, 

Bogs, live, 

Iron^ har, 

Iron, cast, 

Laid 

Leather, 

Machinery 

Molasses, 

Merchandise 

Maitle, 

iCailsand spikes, 

Huts 

Powder 

Pot and pearl ashes, 

Rice 

Rags, , 

Salaratus, 

Sugar, 

Tallow, 



7 
4 
8 
47 

7a 

330 


4 
34 
94 



4 

530 

9,045 

471 

410 



14 

SO 

70,233 



377 
273 
114 
101 



354,703 



3340 

13,407 

45,480 

800,700 

11,019 

10,733 

307 

505 

3,700 

350 

0349 

1,010 

5,104 

7,447 

15,108 

014 

10,000 

390,750 

030 

50 

11,580 

30,503 



01 

8 

07,313 



54 

95 



7 

81 

740 

48 

41 

1 



5 
13 



1 
3401 



10 



1,903 

1.900 

170,493 



4,008 
8,510 
5,775 

37,331 
030 

10,778 
3,745 

35,471 



10,733 

33,000 

053,470 

3,080 



7,044 



1 

S3 
414 

5 



8,003 
98,7«3 



3,010 
454,083 



8,107 

3,307 

103,033 

ISO 

4,000 



15J30 



5 

4 
180 




80 



I 

» 
441 



s.» 



5.38X 



II 

17 
3» 

I 



i 

S7 



4 
t 

n 



Digitized by 



Google 



301 



Statement of articles cleared at LaOro — Continued. 



JrticU*. 



1850. 



1848. 



TVm.IBSO. 



7VM,18tt. 



rouKM. 



Tobtcco, leaf. 

Tobacco, manttfactured.. 

Wool, 

WoodwaTe, 

Weit-lDdia firuit, 

Wtrons 

White lead, 

Xiicellaneoua, 



11,936 

5,594 

55 

1,908 

770 

6,548 



xiicsLLAirsooa. 



fiHcki. nvmbcr, 

Bamli, empty, namber.. 

BUngles. nninberi 

Uthi, namber 

Hoop-polea. number 

Sloae perchea. 

Lumber, feet 

Timber, feet, 

Wood,conla 




WJee travelled,, 
MilefboaUraa,. 



37 

368,156 

36 608 

105 



14,4S9 
18,334 




aDQi 



Digitized by 



Google 



V9 



Statement, of all articles arrived at LaGro on, the Wabash and Erie 
Canal, from the commencenvnt to the close of navigation, in the year 
1850. 




Beans, 

Co«l, 

Coke, 

PtoUtoes 

BABRBLS* 

Ale and beer 

Beef 

CWer 

Plour 

Ftesh water fiih 

8alt water flab 

Common lime, 

Hydraulic lime, 

Unwed oil, 

Lard oil 

Com oil 

Pork 

Fine salt, 

Coarae salt, 

Wblakey 

Domestic spirits, (otber) . 

Tar 

Vittosar, 

Oreen apples , 

pouiins. 

Domestic animali (otber 

tban live bogs.) 

Butter 

Extra ba^age and fprniture, 

Cheese, ^ 

Cofliee, 

Cordage, 

Cotton yams, 

Candles 

Crockery, 

Rice 

Dyeitufli, 

Dried ftnit, 



3S 
SO 

185 . 



31 

3 

6 

96 : 

703; 

41 I 

5, 

502 ; 

17 I 

9 

9 

1 



1 , 
JO 
105 
6 

1 ; 

3 ! 

1 



M74 


953 


918 


103 


113 


20 


35 


6 


31 


5 


51 


8 


230 


20 


0,100 




115 




91,6S8 


40 


4,967 




177,973 


89 


23M 




4.722 




7,305 




50,139 


25 


10,t33 




1,245 




2,303 





Furs and peltries, 

Glass and glass-ware, . 

Grinditones, 

Gypsum 

Pig iron, 

Bar iron 

Cast iron 

Leather, 

Bar lead 

Litharge 

Machinery 

Mill stones 

Molasses 

Merchandice 

Marble, (wrought) 

Nailf and spikes 

NuU 

Potter's ware, 

Powder 

Paper 

Salaratas 

Shot 

Soap 

Starch, 

Sugar 

Saddletrees, 

Leaf tobacco 

Manufactured tobacco, 

Wool 

Wood- ware 

White lead, 

Wagons, 

Miscellaneous, 

HUMBBK. 

Bricks, 

Kmpty barrels 

Brooms, 

Shingles 

Feet lumber, 



44,148 


3 


5.787 


3 


300 




78.9BB 


» 


129;2S4 


iS 


203,911 


147 


37,P63 


19 


916 




3,471 


« 


54,483 


T, 


5,655 


3 


105,775 


S 


549,S01 


875 


3,391 


2 


125,345 


O 


3,7» 


f 


21,965 


11 


990 




1,409 


i 


12,736 


« 


1,103 


1 


1,441 


1 


174 




115650 


S8 


160 




60 




41,581 


« 


50 




11,417 


1 


10,908 


{ 


10,963 


5 


342,564 


17C 


9B9 




IJDM 





11^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



wi 



\taXetnertt of aU articles decayed at Loganspart, an the Wabash and 
Erie Canal f from the commencement to the close of navigation f in 
the yea9' 1849 and 1850. 



Articlu, 



1850. 



1840. 



Ton*, 185U. 



r«iu,i 



i\e und beer. 
Beef. 
3ider, - 
l^ranberrle*. 

P\OUT» - 

Fish, fresh water, 
Pish, salt water. 
Green apples, • 
Lime, common, - 
Lime, hydraulic. 
Oil, Linseed, 
Oil, lard. 
Oil, corn. 
Pork, 
Salt, fine, 
6alt, coaive. 
Tar, 

Whiskey, 
Spirits, domestic, 
Vinegar, - 



Barley, . . . . 

Beans, .... 

Com, 

Coal, mineral. 
Potatoes, . . . , 
Seeds, timothy and clover, 
Seeds, flax, . . . - 
Wheat, .... 



rooKiM. 

Animals other than live hogs. 

Butter, .... 

Baggage and furniture. 

Bacon and pork in bulk. 

Cheese, 

Coffee, .... 

Cordsge, 

Candies, . . . ■ 

Clocks, 

Crockery, 

Eggs, .... 

Pun and peltnei, . 

Feathers, 

Glaieng and other roots, 

Orease, 

Glass and glass* ware, 

Grindstones, 

Hides and skins. 

Hair, . . . 

Iron, pig. 

Iron, bar, 

Iron, cast, 

UnL . . . 

Leather, • 

Lead, bar, 

Machinery, 

MiU-itones, • - 

Molasies, 

MarchandiM, 

Kails and si^ifcea. 



S,S30 

105 

1,164 

15,838 

1,056 

17 

45 

305 

1 

1 

16 

1 

M15 

S431 

360 

19 

236 

43 

19 



614 



140,775 

3,319 

507 

349 

540 

911,484 



1,950 

19,:)06 

103,674 

777,695 

178 

18,160 

3,156 

365 

300 

13,997 

10,950 

S9,09S 

11,267 

7,881 

59.775 

910 

1,190 

37,933 

4,520 

33,684 

38,968 

181,105 

649,856 

3,767 

350 

70 

575 

17,530 

83^398 

6,068 



137 
19,890 

300 



103 



13 
8,705 

8,496 



889 



3 

85,736 

3,730 



10,717 
100,248 



63,206 

69,311 

811,274 

10,275 

3,087 



"Hfiil 



8,379 



4,381 



31,067 
403,490 



10,086 

8,280 

8,000 
176,638 . 
30,000 « 



108 

380 

18 

145 

1.748 

108 
7 



3 
1,183 

373 
3 
41 
8 
3 



18 
15 



. 17 
8»]i» 



9 
1.3W 

364 



8^1 
1« 



87 
6A45 



1 

9 

51 

389 



381 



49 
35 

105 

5 
1 



7 
5 

14 
5 
4 

89 



... 



1 

10 
8 



61 

381 

8 



9 

IS 





48 

3 



S 
1 

1 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



904 



Statement of articles cleared at Loganspart. — Continued. 



Jtrtict$9 



1850. 



1840. 



TVm, 1850. 



TVw.iaa. 



Mats, * - - 

Ollcakft, 

Potter** ware. 

Powder, • 

Paper, - 

Pot and pearl aahee, 

Kage, - . . 

Soap, 

Bhorts and ship etof; 

Sugar, 

Saddle trcM, 

Tallow, . - . 

Tobacco, maanfoctorad. 

Wool, 

Wood-ware, 

Wert India firnlt, 

Wagone, 

Iron ore, • 

Beea-waz, • 

Marble, • • 

lliacelUneona, 



fiilcks, nomber, 

Barrela, empty, nombar, • 

Brooma, number, 

Hoop-polea, number. 

Lathe, number. , 

Bbinglea, nomber, 

Stavea and headings, number. 

Stone, perchei. 

Lumber, feet, .... 

Timber, feet, 

WoodfCorda, . . . . 



mieu travelled, 
miM boats run. 



000 • 

«,3oo : 

4.000 
850 . 

1.506 1 
»,371 , 
38,303 
374 ' 

f.000 
43.5S8 • 
96.810 ! 
13.200 ! 

0.567 1 

3.443 
0.560 

1300,000 




1 

1 






t 




1 








.......... ....) 


1 ! 
" ! 

19 i 




10.057 
18,110 


i 





1 

13 

. ... ..•••.. .. . 




4.468 


s 


......... 




3,585 


f 


91,410 


u 


2 

3 

600 




iHi" 


I 


19.002 

0.480 

100,734 


1 


13,500 

3338 

004 

1.007 
83,000 

SJOO 

fl60 

t7.490 
333» 




3 


33 

36 


as 










1 
14 

1 

68 

1.178 

9,005 

672 









45.000 
800 

07 
000327 


7 

I 

194 

1^ 


m 

38307 
»3t7 


a 


tO,4SS 


13JW 



Digitized by 



Google 



906 



Sia^meni of all articles arrived al Logansport, <m the Wabash and 
Erie Canal, from the commencement to the close of nawation, in 
the year 1850. 



JirtieUs. 



Com, 

roti, . . . 

C«ke« . 

PluaeeiL . 

CommoB Ume, 



Ale «iid beer, • 
Beef, . '. 
Cider, . . 
Plonr, - 
ffwh wtter flah. 
Stit water flih, 
Hrtoulic lime, 

Urtoil, - . 
Corn oil, 
Roe wilt, . 

WhUkey, . . 
Other domettlc iplrfti, 

Vinegir, * . ' . ' 
Green applet, - 



Butter, .... 
Erirt ba^tge and farai 
tore, ■ . . . 

Bacon tnd pork in balk 
garrbPki., . 

Toffee. . . 
Conlife, 
Cotton yaiBfl. • 
Cendlee, 

Oiockt, . . 
^rockery, 
Dye itQffe, 
Jrled fruit, . 

Feathen,*^ . 

»lOMii( end otlwr rooU, 

«lMi tad fInM- ware, 



Jf», 


r#«*. 


10 




9,615 


385 


700 


)4 


131 


4 


91 


1 


9,338 


TO 


14 




17 


3 


1 




3 




72 


8 


eso 


95 


57 


9 


448 


67 


41 


6 


40 


6 


5 


1 


9,447 


).063 


797 


82 


436 


76 


149 


96 


73 


11 


77 


13 


13 


9 


3.156 


2 


108.215 


54 


10.390 


5 


13,814 


7 


450 




14,054 


7 


930,457 


115 


19.994 


6 


8.732 


4 


9,019 


5 


9,376 


1 


77,5« 


39 


992 




699 




1.338 


1 


1,500 


1 


976 




56,716 


98 




ArticUa. 



Grind etonee, 

Oypeum, 

Pig Iron, 

Bar iron, 

Caetiron. 

Sole and other leather. 

Bar lead. • 

Utbarge, 

Machinery. 

MiUatonee. . 

Molaiaea, - 

Merciiandice, 

Wrought Marble, 

Unwrought mai1>Ie, 

Nails and apikea, 

Nuta. - . • . 

Potter's ware, - 

Powder, 

Paper, 

Salts of ley. • 

Salaratus. - ... 

Shot, 

Soap, .... 

ShorU and ship staflTs. 

Sugar, 

Leaf tobacco. 

Manufactured tobacco. 

Wool, . . . ' 

Wood- ware, 

West-India fmit, • 

White lead, 

Wagons, 

Miscellaneonn, - 

Agricultural implements. 



Bmpty barrels, - 

Brooms, 

Laths,. 

Split and flat hoops. 

Shingles, - 

Feet lumber, • 

Cords, wood. 

No. of passengen. 
No. of miles travelled. 
Miles boato run, 



93,449 

5,^95 

199,146 

181,466 

424,437 

32,846 

3,048 

60 

3,697 

9«854 

158,:96 

8 8.441 

15,694 

S66 

84,439 

27,391 

48,711 

9,015 

7,565 

4994 

19,324 

9,008 

9,947 

JO 

210,740 

602 

61,476 

944 

16.408 

3377 

16,6')5 

99,736 

94,174 

17,418 



9^36 
9,068 
11,000 
6,000 

163400 

109,779 

51 



415 

18,195 
99.537 



n 

9 
65 

91 

99 

16 

2 



9 
5 

79 
49 



49 
14 
94 

5 
4 
9 
6 
I 
1 



105 



31 



8 

9 
8 
IS 
47 

9 



93 

1 

9 

9 

9S 



3»460 



Digitized by 



Google 



9(M 



Staiement of all ariicks cleared at LafaytiU on tkt Wakask and 
Erie Canals from the commencement to the dote of namgatum i* 
the year 1849 and 1850. 



Artieitt, 




1849. 



I Tns,\es^ 



Ale ftnd beer, 
Beef, • • 

Cider, - • 
Cranberriee, - 
Flour, - 

Fieb, ftresh water, 
Fleb, Mlt water. 
Green apples, 
Ume, common, 
Jime, bjdrauUc, 
Oil, linseed, • 
Oil, com and lard. 
Fork, - • 
Salt, fine, - 
8an,coane, - 

IVblflkey, 
Spiriu, domeetic, 
Yinefar, 



Beane, .... 

Cora, 

Coal, mineral, ... 

Oata, 

Bye, 

Potatoes^ .... 
Seeds. titnoUy and clover, 
Seeds, flax, .... 
"Wbeat, . - . . , 
Barley, 

rocvof. 

Animals, other than live bofi. 
Butter, .... 
Mtg»9& and fiaraitnte. 
Bacon and pork in bulk. 

Coflbe,' - - 

Conlage, 

Cotton rans. 

Candles, 

Clocks, • 

Crockery, • 

Djt staiTs, 

Bfgs, - . - 

Fruit, dried. • 

Fun and peltriei, 

Featbers, 

Ginseng and otber roots. 

Grease, .... 

Glass and glass ware, 

Grindetonee, - 

Hides and skins. 

Hair, .... 

Hafs,liTe, • 

Iron, pig, 

iTQBfbSLr, • 

bon, cast, 

laid, - 

Lsutbcr, . ■ - 



SS 

i I 

^ i 
68 

1,1881 ' 

20 ! 

ill 

17,194 t 

1,295 : 

78 , 

S35 , 
2,108 
159 

32 ; 



6 

941,794 

7,611 

6,474 

65 

750 

8 

612 

166,053 



6,000 

3,275 

21,711 

1,381,017 

5I,QS9 

66,043 

3,291 

6,291 

4^1 

1,'83 

82,452 

637 

150 

2,993 

3,333 

14,565 

2.393 

183,789 

31,099 

2,730 

94,425 

130 

200,312 

7,600 

135,642 

102,909 

9,S2S;ZI6 

12,003 



1,074 



m 



11,437 
390 



2,153 

f9 

18 497 



213 

1,901.596 

8,6 6 

5,503 

91 



.SI. 



1,211 



S 
3,009 

154 
35 
309 

88 

6 



3 
2.:74 



8,245 

114,419 

437 



13, no 

175,628 

1,371,136 

18,334 

150,836 



99.364 
304 
107 

2 
93 

19 





345 
91 
i 



C7 




66.730 
98,082 



20352 
122,342 



963.74B 
9,486,147 



1 


\ 


7 


1 


1 
98 

16 
1 






47 


If 

ft 


109 

4 

68 

51 






ii 

1.^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



MT 



Staiement of articks cleared at Lafayette — Continued* 



JirtUlM. 



18S0. 



1840. 



r«n«, 1850. 



Tont, 1849. 



POOVM. 

LMd.btf 

Xacbinerj, 

MiUttODM, 

MoltaMs, 

MerchaiKlise, 

Marble, wrought, 

Xtrble, UD- wrought 

9ti la and spikes, 

5ata :..... 

Potter's ware, 

Powder, 

Pot and pearl ashes, 

Piper, 

ialttof ley, 

Salaratvs, 

Shot, 

Soap, 

Shorts and ship atulT, 

SUrch, 

Sugar, 

Sttldle trees, 

Mlow, 

Tobacco, leaf, 

Tobacco, manafactDred, 

Wool,.. 

Wood-ware, 

Weatlndia ftttlt, 

White lead, 

Wagons 

Xtscellaneous, 

MUCBLLAinOOS* 

BTlcks, number, 

Barrels, enpty, number, 

Brooms number, 

Mooppoles, number, 

Uths, number, 

Split and flat hoops, number,. 

Pofltj and rails, number, 

Shingles, number, 

Stages and headings, number, 

Stone, perches, 

Lumber, feet, 

Timber, feet, 

Wood, cords, 

Tan bark, cords, 

Miles travelled 

Miles Boats run, 



4,0W 

61,991 

3,000 

106,363 

S43,]ST 

150 

4,000 

70,8SS 

S3,038 

54396 

5,893 

4,7^ 

K,077 

4,848 

93,941 

9SS 

17,766 

71.646 

633 

304,079 

643 

38,560 

ISO 

93,057 

103.763 

11,.?60 

6,490 

4,031 

14,755 

543,776 



9,096 

1,703 

30,179 

87,818 

5 000 

5,850 

208,500 

180,096 

16,573 

1,408,813 

96,387 

6,335 

73 



431,643 

155,896 



86,575 

30,000 

03,640 

7166,499 



13,171 



11,806 

"»,co6' 



48,413 



11,907 



16,827 

85,043 

1,145,443 



272,674 
90,000 



167,000 



9,134 

1,014,903 

39,803 

6,481 

139 



505,397 
168,807 



3 
31 

1 
53 
17B 

3 

39 

13 

37 

} 

3 

IS 

3 

13 



43 
15 
47 



9 

36 



11 
58 

3 
3 
7 
S7A 



100 

1 

IS 

13 

1 

117 

SI 

996 

33,144 

3,465 

760 

15,819 

73 



6 



8 



136 

14 



18,948 

1,775 

810 

16,909 

139 



93«e55 



78«S31 



Digitized by 



Google 



SOS 



Statement of all articles arrived at LafayeUe an the Wabask 
and Erie Canals from tke commencement to the clou of navigation^ 
in the year 1850. 



jtrtulM. 



JVW. 




ArtieUa. 



Jf; 



r»M. 



Bwley, 

Be&nt, 

Cora, 

Coal. 

Coke, 

OaU 

PoUtOM, 

Rye 

Clover Ac. Med,! 

Flax Med, 

"Wheat. 



Ume, (common) 



BAft&Bfce. 



Ale aad beer 

Beef, 

Flour* 

Freeh water fiah, 

Salt water flah 

Hydraollc lime, 

UMoedoll, 

Laid oil 

Com oil, «• 

Pork ,•• 

Fine ealt 

(^oareeaalt, 

WUakey 

Other domestic ■pbits, . 

Tar 

Vinegar 

Oreen apples, 

Craabernea, 



3,135 

15,900 

90,455 

730 

18 

4,053 

90 

3 

190 

11,739 

10,491 



9 

9,450 

1,384 

150 

i07 

30 

30 

9 

1 

90,807 

4,783 

616 

273 

31 

36 

19 

3 



445 

818 
15 

iii* 

1 



I roDnne. 

Hides and skin 

Hair 

Pig iron 

Bar iron, 

i Cast iron, 

Urd 

Leather, (sole and other). 
Bar lead« 



4 
339 
3U 



308 
100 
93 
16 
9 
5 



9,348 
536 
108 

l! 

6 > 

9 ! 



Animals (domestic) other 

than Uto hogs, j 

Batter, 

Extra baggage and fkimi- 



Bacon and pork in bulk.. 
Broom com, 



13,818 
2.974 

290,804 
9,904 
1,7T2 



Machinery, 

MiUstones, 

Molasses 

Merchandise 

Marble (wrought) 

Marble, (un- wrought).... 

Nails and spikes, 

Nats 

Potter's ware 

Powder, 

Paper 

SalUof ley, 

SalaraUis 

Shot 

8oap 

Shorts and ship stuflT, 

SUrch 

Sucar 

Saddle trees, 

Tallow 

Leaf tobacco 

Manufactured tobacco, . . 

Wool 

Wood- ware, 

West India fruit, 

Whits lead, 

Wafons, 

Miscellaneooa, 



7 
195 j 



ircXBBn. 



Coffee, 

Cordage, 

Cotton yarns.. 

Candlee, 

Clocks, 

Crockery 

Dye stuflb, 



Med'l 



fTed fruit 

Feathers , 

Ginseng and other roots,. 

Glass and glassware < 

Grindstones, 

Gypsum. 



118,623 


50 1 


353,334 


168 


12,068 


6 


90,870 


10 


7,314 


4 


1,030 


1 


130,141 


65 


4,099 


S 


900 




7154 


4 


40 
590 






67,742 


39 


32,430 


16 


U488 


1 



Bricks. 

Empty barrels, 

Brooms 

Hoop poles, 

Uths, 

Split and flat hoops, : 

Posts and rails, 

Shingles, 

Staves and headings,. . 

Stone, perches 

Lumber, feet, 

Timber,feet, 

Wood, cords, 

Shingle bolts, cords,. . 
Tan bark, cords 



4,994 

7» 1. 
118,545 ' 
183,054, 
341,543 : 

396 I. 
119,547 
•JB49 
138.781 , 
18,180 , 
90.7S9 
1,737090 , 
12,402 J 
06.7U7 
89,258 
15J904 
78,048 
15.055 ' 
18.799 t 
503 . 
97,046 ! 
4373 

96.807 ' 

1.714 . 

176.703 ' 

3^10! 

100 '. 

417 . 

87,017 . 

510 . 

37,850 I 

9jm 

20,073 
96.043 

573.006 



500 

14.668 

9.010 

10470 

496,508 

5.000 

9,650 

908,430 

15,195 

9,660,197 

95,930 

6,395 

114 

144 



90 


171 



» 

3 
01 

9 
4S 
OBO 

6 
48 
4S 

8 

at 
« 



14 

t 
1 

n 

1 



10 

s 

15 
13 

9B7 



I 

1 
5 

s 

53 



30,S» 
4>»5$ 

757 
10^13 

981 
144 

S6,43i 



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S09 



StatemetU of aU artides cleared ai CwingUm, on the Wabash and 
Erie Cunalj from the commencement to the close of navigation in 
the years 1849 and 1850. 



JtrtieUt. 



Aakkbu. 



AU ad Bear. 

Ftoor, , 

JM^beth water,. 
J^kjUlt water... 
Unt^ common,... 
IhM, Hydraulic, . 

Oil,UBiwd, 

OJUrt, 

Ptek,...; 

fcit, 

Tir,. 

Whiiker, 

^tf, domestic,. 



Bntey 

Com, 

C»»l,mliwal, . 
Owi. 

Sir- 



toda, timothy tad clover. 

■•jM,lIax, , 

^bm, 



1850. 



Jj|««l»,otliorthaB liyehoss*. 



|>a*fe asd FanVton. '. . , 
JJJjOiBdPbrkln bnlk.. 

Coffee.! 



Jordije 

Jotton Ymbb, 

C*ndle>. 

Crockery 

Dye-rtnffi,... 



Jn»it, dried,'. 



GrtS' *"** '^«'* ^<><»t"»- 



oZS^^'^'^^' 



in, 

g««»»<l8Mn...:.. 

SJSiter.::':--"--" 
J~."«.....::::::: 

i«»W";." 

ifMbtr....;:" 

&;:::••••■•■■•■• 

yrchtndixe,.:::*.;:; 

KJ*. wrought,., 
fc'^^lc, an wrought.. 



13 

67 

155 

4 

S,SS5 

3 

4 

1 

2,063 

1,794 

46 

370 



307,058 

29,828 

1,253 

M 

n6 

28 

33 

18.561 



1,700 
960 



600,132 

24,622 

14,660 

1,423 

1,024 

1,180 

8.238 

821 

300 

717 

2.620 

2,143 

427 

10,874 

7,760 

68 

12,806 

10,804 

24 190 

13,547 

74,942 

44,716 

321,799 

6.094 

344 

21,085 

4,185 

l49.rJ85 

3.170 



1849. 



38,183 
'2,350 



774 
56 



Tong, 18ML 



66 

304.664 

50.717 

10,614 

54 

26 

418 
28,222 



4,520 

42,010 

740,969 

8,407 

966 



3,553 



10,762 



206,785 



15,648 

12,109 

141,621 

1,734 



6.000 



2D22 



r»M,i84i. 



8 

7 
S3 

1 



6 


1 


I 


101 
1,426 


444 

960 

7 
65 

4 


.s" 


122 


91 




..1 



5,7«f 

1.193 

21 

3 

3 

1 

1- 

556 



96 
305 

19 

7 
1 



6 
5 

12 

7 

37 

28 

161 

3 



11 
9 

75 

1 



'?!. 



"J 



17$ 

r 



9 
91 

4 
1 



1 


::;::::;:::::! 4 \:vmvmv... 




V.,'. 1 




::::::::::::::j r* ::::;;:;:;:::; 


2,422 ; 1 i 1 


5 


9.037 4 . 5 



5 



71 

1 



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2i0 



Statement of articles cleared at Covington — Continued. 



ArticU9. 



1850. 



1840. 



r«M, 1649. 



nv.idt 



Potter's wftie, 

Powder,' - 

Paper, - - 

Rftgt. 

Salaratus, • 

Shot, . - - 

Soap, - 

Shorts and ship stulT, 

Starch, 

Sugar, - 

Tkllow, . - - 

Tobacco, manufactured, 

Wool, .... 

Wood-ware, - 

West-India fhiit, 

White lead, - » 

Wagons, 

Miscellaneous, 



XlSCBLLANBOt'S, 

Bricks, number. 
Barrels, empty, number. 
Laths, number, - 
Shingles, number, - 
Stone, perches. • 
Lumber, fiset, - 
Timber, feet. 
Wood, cords. 
Shingle bolts, cordtf, 



15,303 
2,S80 
5,967 

soo 

2,0D8 
100 
630 

6,344 

595 

18,768 

300 

8,918 



889 



18,000 



Miles travelled, 
Miles boats run, • 



18,118 
8,408 
1,750 
4,905 

73,373 



2,000 

633 

83,000 

46,700 

75 

50,448 

7,318 

131 



183,081 
45,310 



18,848 
35,906 



5.316 
110,504 



88,000 

45,000 

30 

10,965 



814,814 
67,835 



4 

18 
6 

1 

1 

8 

37 



3 

6 
4 
6 

ISO 
88 

819 



10,688 



ns» 



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211 



Sititefnent of 'all arlicki arrived ai CcmTigton^on the Wabash and 
EttU Canalf from i/ie commencement to the close of navigation^ in 
tAc year 185U. 



JtrtUlM, 



Jfo, 



T^iu.' 



JSrtieltg, 



Jfo, 



TViM. 



Cora - 
Coal 
Oats - 
PotatoM, 

Lime, 

BAJLftBU. 

Ale and beer 

Beef 

Flour 

Fiab, fteah water ■ 

Pish, salt water 

Hydraulic lime 

Linaeed oil 
Lard oil 
Fine salt - • 
Coarse salt • 
MThisker - • 
Otber domeatic apirita 
Tar - . . • 
Vinegar 

PODHDa. 



1,401 

2,000 

80 

313 

9 

3,184 



14 

1 

187 

S90 

14 

14 

SS 

7 

4,323 

50 

3S0 

34 

43 

9 



39 
80 

1 




Animala, (domeatic) other 

tban live hoga 0^ 
Baggage, (extra) and furni- 
ture .... 43,170 
Bacon and porlc in bulk - 8,034 
CheeM ... - 16,900 
Coffee .... 64,961 
Cordage 2,376 
Cotton yama • 8,411 
Candlea ... - 4,784 
Clocfca .... 83 
Crockery 37,894 
Dye atuffa .... 3,633 
Dried ftuit . - ■ 330 
Glaas and glaaa ware 31,716 
Grindatuaea - I 1.400 



SO 

44 

3 

3 

3 

1 

486 

6 

56 

4 

6 

1 



AgricuUttral implementa 

Bar iron • 

Caat iron 

Hole and other leather 

Bar lead 

Machinery 

Molaiaea 

Merchandiie • 

Marble, wrought - 

Marble, un wrought - 

Naila and epikea . 

Nuta 

Potter'a ware 

Powder - 

Paper 

Salaratua - 

Shot 

Soap - 

Starch 

Sugar . 

Saddle treea 

Leaf tobacto 

Manufactured tobacco 

Wood.ware - 

Weat-India fhiit - 

White lead - 

Wagoni . 

Miacellaneoua 

NUMBBK. 



Empty Barrela - 
Utha . 
Paaaengera 
Milea travelled 
Milea boat! run 
•Shinglea 
Stone, perchea • 
Lumber, feet - 
Timber, feet 
Shingle bolts, curdf 



11,494 

43,341 

339,971 

SL608 

2^75 

55,830 

39,781 

464,056 

9,310 

35,000 

19,030 

1,638 

8,339 

1,345 

5,489 

0,890 

1,300 

1,450 

1,116 

67,339 

40 

984 

36,193 

30,371 

1,318 

10/178 

5,664 

67,733 



400 

680 

836 

59,677 

37,356 

746,500 

50 

43,113 

7,318 

83 



6 

83 

165 
11 

1 

88 

30 

338 

S 

18 

10 

1 

1 

1 

3 

5 

1 

1 

1 

34 



13 
10 

I » 

5 

3 
34 



118 

JOO 

75 

890 

308 



8,390 



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313 



Statement of all articles cleared at Terre IfaiUe^ oi^ th^ W&^oik mi 
Erie Canals from the commencement to the close qf navigation » 
the year 1850. 



ArtUlM. 



18S0. 



1849. 



r«iw, 185C r#w. 3SA 



SARRBLfl. 

Ale and beer, 

Cnnberriet 

Flour, 

Fith, fteth water 

Fith, salt water, 

Lime, common, 

Oil lard, 

8alt.fine, 

Salt, coarie, 

Tar, 

Whiskey 

8pirit«, domeatic 

vinegar, 

BUeHBLS. 

!«"•> 

Com 

Potatoes, 

9e«lji,flax, 

VfYunX, 

POUNDS. 

Animals other than live hogs, 

Buttert 

Baggage and furniture 

Bacon and pork in bulk, 

Broom corn, 

Cheese 

Coffee, 

Cotton yarn, 

Candies 

Clocks 

Crockery 

Bye stuffs, 

Plrult, dried 

Furs and peltries, 

Feathers 

Ginseng and other roots, 

Glass and glass-ware, 

Grindstones 

Gypsum, t 

Hides and skins, 

Hair 

Iron, bar, 

Iron, cast, 

Land 

Leather 

Machinery, 

Molasses 

Merchandise 

Hails and spikes, 

Nnts :. 

Powder 

Paper, 

Salaratn 

Soap, 

Starch, 

Sagar, 

Tallow, 

Tobacco, manufactured, 

Wool 



II 

1 
935 
52 
16 
2 
4 

93 

40 

223 

24 

1 



3 

2,771 

199 

47 

2,311 



eoo 

979 

21,6«6 

1,530 

1,157 

6,966 

9,892 

429 

80 

130 

6,440 

179 

10,497 

675 

5«64 

3,858 

460 

58 

605 

8,770 

44^14 

42,773 

14,967 

276 

5,676 

5,000 

7,300 

65,883 

7,251 

13,680 

2,100 

1,370 

204 

36 

40 

7/171 

1.261 

2,352 

4,662 



101 
8 

1 



1 
271 
vl5 

6 
39 

4 



78 
6 
1 

OS 



tt 

21 
7 



3 
2 

4 

32 
4 

7 

1 
1 



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SIS 



tiaiemeni of artiekt cleared <U Terre Bauie—ContinMed. 



JtrtUlit. 



poumw. 

Wood-WftlB, 

WertlBdia ftvit 

White ImA, 

Wafont 

iDtcellaBOOtts, 

Hpoppol«8, onmlMr 

Lttbi. nuaoLDer 

SUves and hsaAiofi, BQmber, 

Bricks, n«inber, 

Stone percbet, 

lumber, ftet 

Timber. fi»et, 

Wood, conk, 

Sbinsle b«it«, c4ni>, 

Wlei tnvelled, 

Jlilnbo«t« nil,.. 



1690- 



3,931 

1,350 

350 

756 
86^14 



6,1S 
15,300 
38,800 
10,000 
183 
9^800 



lt5,S<3 
<4,5I» 



7«s«, 1850. 



% 
3 

CO 

15 

386 

80 

157 

1,565 

5 



3/M5 



T»na, ] 



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214 



Statement of all articles oi'tHved at Terre HavJte^ en the Wdbask awi 
Erie CanaU fi*^^ ^^ commencement to the close of navigation, t« 
the year 1850. 



Atielst. 



JV«. 


T\nu. 




• 


961 

1,117 

300 


43 
18 

8 
94 

9 


18 

1,193 

IS8 

24 

38 

7 

S 

••i 

181 
58 

68 
S 
1 


3 

130 

19 

4 
6 

1 
1 


1,034 

108 

38 

10 

10 




1 
600 




12376 

4,385 

60 

42,683 

91,664 

3,471 

10,164 

677 

930 

27,540 

'^ 

33 

19,902 
1415 
1^ 


6 
2 


21 
46 
2 
5 


14 

1 




10 

1 
1 




TVm. 



Corn 
Coal • 
PoUtoet 
Wheat 
lime 



Ale and beer - 
Floor - 
Plih, fireeh water 
FUh, lalt water • 
Hydraolie lime 
Lineeed oil • 
Lard oil • • 
Corn oil 
Pineealt • 
Coane ealt - 
vnilakey • 
Otlier domeetic apirlts 
Tar . . • - 
Vinecar - • 
Cranberriee 



POUHIM. 

Domeetic anlmele oilier 

than live hogs • 
Extra haggife and fanii- 

ture 
Bacon and pork in bulk 
Broom com 
Cheeee • 
Coffee 
Cordage • 
Cotton yams 
Candles • 
Clocks . 
Crockerr 
Dye stairs - 
Dried flrnit 
Feathers • 
Olase and glass-ware 
Oypenm • 
Hides and Bkittfl - 



Figlron • 

Bar iron 

Cast iron 

Lartl .... 

Leather sole and other 

Lead, bar 

Machinery 

Mill stones • 

Molasses . . . 

Merchandise 

Marble, wrought - 

Marbie, unwrought - 

Nails and spikes • 

NttU .... 

Powder • 

Paper .... 

Salaratus 

Shot .... 

Soap 

Starch .... 

Sucar 

Saddle trees 

Tallow . 

Tobacco, manufactured 

Wood-ware - 

West-India fruit 

White lead 

Wagons 

Miscellaneous 



Hoop poles 



Miles travelled • 
Boats run 
Shingles 

Staves and headings 
Stone, perches - 
Lumber, feet 
Timber, feet • 
Wood, cords 
Sbingle bolts, cords 



49^17 

.15,496 

58,413 

69 

34,431 

490 

13.170 

6,060 

34,649 

5IM,M1 



92,400 

13,381 

11,430 

6,630 

16^19 

7,464 

400 

564 

1,2S2 

63J048 

183 

87 

S3,7M 

11,119 

1,468 

4.316 



9,909 
95,390 
83,723 
36,610 
147.0QO 
39,700 
183 
54,4» 
5^ 



3 

r 

sr 



74 
» 

i 



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Poc. No. 4.] [Part II, 

SEVENTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OFTHB 

TRUSTEES AND SUPERINTENDENT 

OVTHB 

INDIANA ASYLUM 



vos 



EDUCATmG THE DEAF AND DUMB. 



TO THB 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



3,000 COPIES ORDERED TO BE PRINTED. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

3. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 

1851. 

SDSS 



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OFFICERS AND TfiUSTElS. 



FreslAent of the BoaiA. 
REV. EDWARD R. ABfES. 

Secretary* 
REV. LOVE H. JAMESON. 

Treasurer. 
COL. JAMES P. DRAKE, Treasurer vf State. 

Tnutee^. 

LIVINGSTON DUNLAP, M. D., 
REV. LOVE H. JEMESON, 
REV. EDWARD R. AMES, 
ALFRED HARRISON, Eat). 
JAMES S. BROWN. 



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INTELLECTUAL DEPARTMENT. 



•■p«rliitea4eBt of tk« Asyli 

JAMES S. BROWN, A. M. 

lB«tf«eton. 

WILLIAM WILLARD, First Assistant, 
CHARLES AXTELL, A. M., Second Assistant, 
WILLIAM DbMOTT, A. B., Third Assistant, 
JEREMIAH TINGLEY, A. B., FouHh Assistant, 
MARTIN M. HANSON, ManUor. 



DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 



Phr«tclaa« 
LIVINGSTON DUNLAP, M. D. 

■•troa. 

MISS LUCY JAMESON. 



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REPORT. 



To the jahnarMe Qenikmeu rf the SenaU 

and of the Mouse of Repretentaiivee: 

The Trustees of the Indiana Asylum for Educating the Deaf and 
Pumb respectfully present their seventh Annual Report. 

We gratefully acknowledge during the past year the same Profvi* 
dfential care of its varied interests, the same blessing on the health 
of its inmates which iiave formerly marked the history of this 
Asylum. Favored of Heaven, and honored with the confidence of 
the humane people of the State, all which could at any time have 
been said of its prosperity is now most emphatically true. 

We expressed in our last Report the hope of being able to occupy 
the new Buildings, at the opening of the present session. By the 
most strenuous exertioBs on the part of the Building Committee, the 
Architect, and the Contractors, our anticipations have been accom^* 
{dished. The mutes of our State have now a Aojne which, in point of 
convenience, fitness of arrangement, and provision for comfort is, 
unsurpassed by any kindred Institution in the Union. And it affords 
us pleasure to assure you, that these buildings have been erected at 
an expense so moderate, as to astonish any one who passes through 
all the extensive apartments for domestic purposes, dormitories, and 
school rooms. 

As was intimated last year, we have found it necessary to antict* 
pate, in a great measure, the revenue of 1850, for building purposes. 
In doing so, we but complied with the ekmest solicitations of tHe 
parents of the pupils, and carried out what we believed to be the 
wishes of the Legislatiireandr of the peopte at large.* In « fimneial 



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view» to say nothiag of the other still more weighty considerations, 
this policj has proved most salutary. From our experience thos&r, 
we are satisfied, that the occupancy of the present buildings will 
save to the State, at least two thousand dollars per annum. 

Though, considering the pressing wants of some departments of 
the Asylum, especially the necessity of erecting shops, in which to 
teach trades to the pupils, nt might be prdper to ask the L^islatnre 
for a special appropriation from the State Treasury, still, we have con- 
cluded to submit the matter to the discretion of your honorable Body, 
without specific recommendation. 

It is gratifying to look forward to a time, not distant, when this 
Board may recommend, without detriment to the interests of the 
Asylum, a reduction of the revenue assessed for the Deaf Dumb; a 
step which we shall not fail to take, at the earliest practicable period. 
Although should the assessment be continued at the present rate for 
perhaps two years more the prosperity of the Asylum will be secured, 
still candor compels us to state, that it could not now be reduced 
without the most seriously injurious coisequences. An increase of 
one half in the number of the pupils, and also diat the buildings are 
found to coat somewhat more thun was at fiqst titimated by the 
Architect, will satisfactorily account for the necessity of continuing 
the present rate of taxation for this Asylum longer, by one or two 
years, than was at first anticipated. 

It is a most gratifying circumstance, that the pupils of the Asylum 
have manifested during the past year, as heretofore, a commendable 
•pirit of industry ; and have thus materially lessened the expendi* 
lores which would otherwise have been incurred. 

The most important of the improvements yet necessary, are work 
shops for the mechanical employments of the pupils; and a cheap 
s^t of gas works for lighting the buildings. Whether we shall be able 
to erect these during the coming year, is a matter of doubt, still, 
considering their importance, it is to be hoped that their construction 
will not be long delayed. 

Every year's experience demonstrates knore plainly th* wisdom of 
the Legiriative eteetment, by which all the Mutes of the State are 
alU(ei«iUtbd to U^ privilegeB of the Asylumt (ree of charge. In- 



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iana has the proud distiDction of being the first Slate in the Unioa 
J adopt the principle. It speaks well for the benevolent feeling. 
revalent in our sister State Illinois, that she has been the first to^ 
Mow the example; and, from present indications, it would seem 
hat Ohio, at least in part of her Renevolent Institutions, will adopt 
he same course. The paltry pittance obtained on account of the 
Bw pay pupils under the old system, was not worth the mortifica- 
ion occasioned to the manly spirited poor men who were compelled 
o procure certificates of poverty, or consign their children to all the 
niseries of hopeless ignorance. It would seem misfortune enough 
o have a mute child, without being compelled to go before any body 
>f men and plead poverty, as the only condition upon which that 
:hild can be educated. 

The agricultural department has been placed on a very satisfactory 
footing, by the employment of an experienced scientific farmer. 
The prospect now is, that we shall be fully able to accomplish all 
ihat we have purposed in this matter. 

In this connection, we would state, that ia accordance with a 
Joint Resolution passed at the last session of the Liegislature, we 
have purchased thirty'-slx acres of land, laying immediately contigu* 
ous to that upon which the Asylum is erected. All the land now 
belonging to the State, for the use of the Deaf and Dumb Asylum 
amounts to one hundred and twenty acres. 

The manner in wliich the Superintendent has discharged his duties 
during the past year, has met the entire approval of the Board of 
Trustees. His labors have been peculiarly arduous, acting as the 
Secretary of the Building Committee, and keeping the entire ao- 
counts of the disbursements of that department, sustained by the 
most accurate vouches in addition to his other laborious duties. For 
these extra services, he has neither asked nor received the slightest 
remuneration. 

- For the manner in which the other officers have discharged their 
duties, we respectfully refer your honoraUebody to the Report of the 
Superintendent, herewith submitted. We also take pleasure in refer* 
ring to the same document for additional statements m regard to the 
operations of the Asylum, during the past yean The Report of the 
Physician is also appended, as affording a satisfactory account of the 



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S26 

health of the pupils. An account of the funds drawn from the 
State Treasury is presented in the Report of the Treasurer of State, 
^ho is also the Treasurer of this Asylum. The expenditures for the 
Buildings, and for the Boarding Department will be seen by referenc# 
to the abstract of the accounts of the Building Committee, and the 
account current of the Superintendent. We have thought it a mat* 
ter of importance to preserve these two classes of expenditures sep- 
arate, as thus being of more cdnvenient leference, and more easy 
comprehension. In the accurate method which has been adopted, 
legal vouchers are obtained and filed for perpetual preservation, for 
every item of expenditure incurred. The Books containing these 
accounts, are open, at all times, for the inspection of any of your 
Honorable Body, desirous of examining them. 

The time when the existence of an Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb 
was an experiment, in Indiana, has passed. The people have willed 
that its continuance, and that of its kindred Asylums, shall be co- 
extensive with the duration of the State government. It appears 
that a provituon to this effects will be incorporated m the new oiigui- 
ic law of the State, which, when it shall have received the sanction 
of the popular vote, will remain, as a perpetual memorial of what 
the generous citizens of Indiana, in this our day, had it in their hearts 
to do for those children of mbfortune, the Deaf and Dumb, the Lu- 
natic, and the Blind. 

In behalf of the Board of Trustees : 

E. R. AMES, Pres. 

NOTE. 

The following letters are appended, as affording explicit informa- 
tion of the manner in which funds are disbursed in the Asylum. It 
may be well to observe, that the financial system presented in the 
reply of the Trustees, has been the result of the experience of years, 
as well as the fruit of much inquiry, and investigation, in other Insti* 
totions. We cannot see how a practicable system can be more guar- 
ded than ours; still, if one better, and more secure, can bedevMd,wa 
shall not hesitate to adopt itknmediately. 

E. R. AMES, Pras. 



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iNDLiNAPOLISy IlTDIARAy April 4lby 18S0« 

James S% Brmon^ Superintendent of the 

Deaf and Dumb Asylum : 
Dbar Sib: — In looking to the various duties which devolve 
upon me, in the discharge of my official acts, I find that a general 
supervisatory power is placed in my hands, by the Legislature, over 
the benevolent institutions of the State ; and, acknowledging frankly 
to you my ignorance of the management of those Institutions,' and, 
being anxious to understand the entire machinery, from the assess- 
ment of the tax, (that is so cheerfully paid by our fellow citizens,) to 
the disbursement of the money, I have taken the liberty of asking at 
your hands information on the following subjects: 

What is the present niode of receiving money in your Institution 
from the State Treasury — what amount is usually received at a time, 
and where deposited when received ? 

In what manner is the money dbbursed, aftejr it is received from the 
State Treasury ? 

Are any bonds required of those who receive, or pay out money ; 
if so, who, and what is the amount of the penalty of each bond? 

Can you suggest any additional guards or checks for the receiving, 
disbursement, or keeping money in your institution ? 

You. will confer a favor on the undersigned by giving the above 
an answer at your le'isure. I would be pleased to receive any addi* 
tional suggestions on any of the subjects connected with the man- 
agement of your Institution. 

I am yours very respectfully : 

JOSEPH A. WRIGHT. 



InanruTloif for f hb Dbaf and Dukb, ) 
Indianapolis, May 22d, 1850. > 

fiit Excellency f Joseph A. Wright : 

Dbar Sir: — In reply to your communication of the 4th ult* 
Addressed to the Superintendent of the Institution, and by him refer^ 
red to us, as the official organ of communication with the State got- 
•mment, we beg leave to assure you, that thb Board views with 



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228 

pleasure the exhibitioD of such kindly interest in the aflairs of the 
Asylum, on the part of the Chief Magistrate of the State. Support- 
ed as the Institution is, by the united contributions of all, we have 
ever regarded it the right, not only of the Executive, and the Legis- 
lature, but of the humblest citizen of the State, to be thoroughly as- 
sured that every dollar thus raised, is sacredly guarded, and faithfully 
appropriated to the objects intended by a generous, and confiding 
public. Nor, have we been satisfied that these funds should simply 
be used in furtherance of the benevolent purposes of the Asylum ; 
but we have also been determined, that they should be carefully, 
economically, and judiciously expended. Of the success attending 
our efforts, yourself, the Legislature, and the people of the State at 
large, are to judge. 

It may not however be inappropriate for us to observe, that 
among othersf the following results have been attained : a school 
unprecedentedly large and flourishing has been sustained ; the pupils 
all boarded, lights, fuel, and washing included; the furniture, beds, 
and bedding necessary for their use, purchased ; school room fixtures 
and apparatus, as well as all their books provided ; some twenty- 
five or thirty indigent pupils clothed ; house rents paid ; in short, all 
the current expenses met,/or a less sum than is actually paid for 
board by an equal number of persons at the several boarding-houses in 
the city. Again, buildings have been erected* and mostly paid for, 
in addition to thus supporting the school. And the expenditares for 
t>oth purposes, have been met out of a fund, which, in some States, 
would scarcely be regarded as more than adequate to discharge the 
current expenses of the school. 

As the buildings, with such appropriate enlaigements as may be re- 
quired, will, for successive generations, form the Asylum^the educatum* 
al home for the mates of this great State, we may also be permitted 
to advert to the fact, that there it not a public building woithin i£s 
borders which has been constructed at so Kttle expense in proportion to 
the sixe, neither has there any been SuHt of better material^ or in a 
more woorkmanlike^ and substantial manner. That the forgoing 
statements are facts, any person who will take pains to investigate, 
will be abundantly satisfied. 

Thus much for the practical operations of a system of financial 
0[)erations, the details of which, in answer to your interrogatories, 
follow : 



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329 

1st. The Treasurer of Slate is Treasurer of the Asylum, and 
keeps its funds, with those of the State, in his own office, or in de- 
posite in the Branch Bank, until they are wanted to meet current ex- 
penditores, or the outlays upon the buildings. All moneys are drawn 
by order of the Board, duly signed, and recorded by the President 
of the same, which orders are by the Treasurer filed, recorded, and 
carefully^ preserved, as his vouchers on his annual settlement with 
the Board ; at which time, in their lieu, he receives a warrant from 
the Auditor of* State for their amount, and these orders, two distinct 
records of them still remaining in the hands of the President of the 
Board, and in the office of the Treasurer of State, are filed for per- 
petual preservation, in the office of the Asylum. The details of ex- 
penditures for building, are under the direction of a Building Com* 
mittee, consisting of three members of the Board, appointed by the 
same, and sanctioned by act of the General Assembly. To this 
committee are given, as may from time to time be necessary, orders 
on the Treasurer of the Asylum, which are signed, filed, recorded 
and preserved as above. On the reception of an order, the Treasu- 
rer gives his check for the amount on the Branch Bank. This sum 
cannot then be drawn out by the committee, or any member there- 
of ; but is left in deposite, until actually required for immediate use, 
in the sanne place in which it was put by the Treasurer of State. 
The sum thus placed in deposite by the Building Committee, never 
exceeds five thousand dollars. In the same manner, are orders giv- 
en to, and amounts (or rather checks for amounts) deposited by the 
Superintendent for the Boarding Department, etc. The sums thus 
deposited, scarcely ever exceed two thousand dollars. 

2d. The manner of disbursing is in all cases for building purpos- 
es, and in all possible cases for current expenses, by checks. Receipts 
are also taken, recorded and filed for perpetual preservation. Care- 
ful, and accurate accounts (leferring to and sustained by the proper 
vouchers, and also by the above mentioned checks, which are in like 
manner recorded and filed for perpetual preservation,) are kept in 
appropriate books. So admirably is the system carried out, that 
three distinct, and legal vouchers are incidentally obtained, one of 
which recites the accounts, item by item, to the value of a single 
cent ; and besides, not less than two distinct book entries are made 
of every account credited, and three of every sum paid out. The 



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330 

Superintendent acts as oar clerk, in keeping oor books, etc^ withoQt 
compensaUoa. 

3d. or onrselves, or our BuiUing Committee, as we handle no 
money, nor have any compensaUon for our services, the Legislatnre 
has never required any Bonds ; and of the Superintendent, as he 
performs the duties of Clerk, as above stated, without compensatioD, 
and as he scarcely ever has in his possession more than one hundred 
dollars, we have thought it unnecessary to require Bond; thot^he 
has repeatedly tendered them. Nor b there, so far as we know, in 
the United States, an Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb, where such s 
bond is required of the Superintendent. 

4th. It is our unanimous opinion that in no department of the 
State expenditures b a system in operation more guarded, ^f indeed, 
equally so,) than ours. All reasonable checks which we could devise, 
have already been imposed ; for the suggestion of many of these we 
have been indebted to the Superintendent. We should be mucb 
pleased, however, to receive from your Excellency, any suggestions 
which might tend to the improvement of our present system. Nor 
would we .wait, until the IiCgblature should require their adoption, if 
it should be in our power sooner to put them in force. Again tend- 
ering you an expression of thanks for the kindly interest manifested 
in the welfare, and success of this Asylum, a sentiment which you 
have not failed to evince, since the commencement of your adminis- 
tration, we subscribe ourselves, 

With much respect, 

By order of the Board : 

EDWARD R. AMES, Preset 
L. H. JAimoN, Sect. 



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231 

SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 

To the Trustees: 

GEHTUEMiEif : — In compliance with your direction, I 
have the pleasure of presenting my Annual Report: 

The kind dealings of a merciful Providence have been manifested 
in a signal manner to this Asylum, to its officers, and inmates, during 
the year just numbered with the past. Considering the crowded state 
of the buildings occupied for most of the year, their ill adaptation 
to a household so large, with wants so diversified as ours ; when, in 
addition, we reflect that those tenements were situated in a densely 
populated part of the city, with but little opportunity for healthful 
etercise and breathing the pure air, it is truly wonderful that our pu- 
pils have suffered so little from sickness. When, during the past 
summer, the pestilence that walketh in darkness and slayeth at noon- 
day, vbited so many portions of our State, bearing death and mourn- 
ing into so many households, that God who tempereth the wind to 
the shorn lamb,'bade it spare the already misfortune smitten Deaf and 
Dumb. To Him, it seemed enough of sorrowful chastening, that, 
farfrom home^ and the soothing care of the family circle, our mutes 
pursued their silent way ; and to their friends, He added not the 
crushing affliction of mourning an ever vacant seat at the paternal 
hearth. 

The commencement of the present session formed a jubilee in the 
progress of the Asylum. On the 2d of October, 1850, the mutes of 
Indiana took possession of the comfortable and commodious build* 
iogs, erected for them, through the abounding generosity of the peo- 
plo of the State. True, some slight inconveniences had to be met 
here at first, and the improvements about the Institution are yet not 
completed. But with glad hearts our pupils surveyed, again and 
^gain, all parts of the structures, and in their own impressive lan- 
guage said they were ^good.** It were satisfaction enough for any 
citizen of the State, to see them in their happy home. They now 
l^ave ample room to exercise, to labor foi their own support, and to 
breathe the free, pure, and invigorating air of heaven. Their op- 
portunities for mental improvement are now very much increased ; 



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232 

it is really possible to advance them now in six months, as far as 
previously in ten. Although we now have in" the Asylum pupib 
upon the criticism of whose scholarship we have repeatedly, and 
successfully staked the reputation of the school; though minds have 
here been developed in such a manner that we should scarcely shrink 
from a comparison with any school in the country, still we are con- 
cious that the past should not in this respect, content us; but, sur- 
rounded, as we now are, with these additional facilities, we should 
place the average index of scholarship at a much higher point, than 
has hitherto been attained. The prospect for the future never has 
assumed so fair an aspect, as is now presented. Every succeeding 
year must add to the comforts of our pupils. With the labor of their 
own hands, they can now raise a great portion of their provisions; 
while the exereise thus aflTorded will invigorate their physical sys- 
tems, and fit their refreshed minds the belter to combat with the dif- 
ficulties of literary progress. The saving of expenditure incidental 
to this course will be very great; and, while I would not have (he 
insincerity to for one moment intimate, that ours may be made a 
self-supporting esiablishnient, still, it may in all confidence be asser- 
ted, that with the agricultural facilities aflTorded, this may be man- 
aged with less expense to the State than any similar Institution in 
the Union. To secure this end, no effort of mine shall be ibund 
wanting; and a similar feeling is common with my associates, in the 
literary and domestic departments of the Institution. 

While the importance of teaching our pupils the best mode of 
tilling the soil cannot be over estimated ; we should still reflect that 
this will not form their sole occupation in future life. Many of 
them will wish to turn their attention to trades, even while in the 
Asylum ; that they may be the better prepared to procure self-sup- 
port, when they leave our walls. We have repeatedly announced to 
a consenting public, that our scholars should here be taught trades. 
Many of our present pupils desire, before leaving us, to learn somt 
handicraft employment. Their education would seem but half com- 
plete without. We have but half accomplished the beneficienl in- 
tentions of the Legislature and people of the State, when we hare 
educated the minds of our pupils. They should be returned to their 
homes useful citizens; capable, by their own exertions, of adding to 
the wealth of the State. These and many other considerations point 
to the propriety of erecting our work shops as soon as practicable. 



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t w^uid add s6 much to (he usefulness of the Institution, tliat I can 
carcely* refrain from respectfully suggesting the propriety of asking 
ispeeifieapprtvprfatiofi for the purpose. From the data before me, 
feel sure these buildings might be erected for some six or seven 
hoasand dollars; It nlay not be inappropriate to suggest, that while 
pecifio appropriations hate been repeatedly made to various other 
>bjects, but a single one, and that years ago, has been made to the 
nstitatfon for (he Deaf and Dumb. The number of our pupils is 
low so great, so many of them have nearly completed their educa* 
ional ootttse, that what is done idiould be done quickly $ or, sdme 
f our pupils will bo thrown upon the world, without any means 
>f supporting themselves. TbU is not a matter of co^jectiiref a ournr 
)er of our older pupils are orphans, or have* parents who 90*9 onabl^ 
support them ; and turning them upon the world withoot a trade* 
m\l in many instances^ be consigniiig them to aUle of penury and 
ivant. 

For soeh of bar pQpila as desire it, Aei importance of learning trades 
xmnot be overrated. It is geaerltHy ftitile to ei[f>ebt they will su> 
|uire them, after leaving school, unless they have made some pro- - 
;ress in thorn previously to graduating. UnaUe to converse except 
)y8^ns, or the slow process of writingi it is found somewhat diifi* * 
!uU to teaob them a trader unless the mastar-vrorkman knows ^ome* 
hug of the bn^iage- of signs. TMs is of course rarely found to be 
he case; and the conseqoeace b, that mates who leave an Asylum* 
nrithout a trade, usoally learn none during their lives. Ail of oiir ' 
Hiplls cannot be advantageously employed upon the farm. While a 
Kirtion, tnch of the boys as may intend to pursue farming for a Hv* 
Dg, are emptoyed ia agriculture, another pdftlon must remain tdlfe, 
inless they have some meohanical employment to which they may ^ 
urn tbetr attention. Should such be the case, an evil, of whoser * 
Dagnitude few can judge, is imposed upon the mute. During hispu- 
ulage he will form habits of indolence, which will forever cramp hie* 
nergies; and render him, if no worse, ,to say the least, a useless 
aember of society. There is no sentiment in which Instructors of ^ 
he Deaf and Dumb are more nnanimoos, than in this, that all pu« >. 
its, male and female should learn some useful trade or occupation^ 
ipon which they, may rely for sopport in future li(ji. A feeling of 
ndependence, all agree, should be infused into them which would • 
nake them scorn to obtain subsistance^ after leaving school, from 
8D24 



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the mitappliad chariix •T tfi» braar oioat And, allow oii, oa tkt 
occasiont to reiterate my strong convbtioii» that tbere m no naore 
propriety of organiziog an lostitutioa like thist with a new to a per- 
manent exclusion of trades, than there woald be to endeavor to eeny 
forward the educational departoMnt without teacben, or book& 
Our pupils, to their praise be it said, are fully impressed with a desire 
to render themselres useful members of the commonity. No one 
more excites their disgoslt than an indolent vagabond having nothing 
to do. They are habitaaUy active, and if afforded an <q>portanity 
will make as good mechanics and artificers, as the State can pro- 
duce« 

it is a. matter of sincere rejoicing, that the Legislature, in the ex- 
ercise of a wise forecast, have authorised the purchase of lands for 
tlie use of the Asylum ; so that agricuhwre^ in its most appropriate 
sigaiication, may be taught our pupils. A farmer has been procured 
whose knowledge of all the departments of his duties is most thor- 
ough and accurate; and, uador his direction, we have no donbt the 
male pupila will cause oar groonds to assuese a comely mod cheeilid 
aspect, rendering them at once a source of profit to the Asylua, and 
a pleasure to themselves, as well as the thousands of our Mlow citi- 
zens who annually visit the Asylum. The knowledge winch oar 
pupils will incidentatty acquire, wiH be of moeh benefit to theas la 
future life. They will be fiMiad to understand many things in rsganl 
to the management of fiurme, which are not generally knowut and 
which will render tlieir servioes^tn great requisition after leaving us. 
Horticulture will also be introduced, in all its departments, and, 
should we not be disappointed, a garden will be ultimately made, 
seoond to none in the State. It affords me the more pleasure to al- 
lude to this subject, as it will be conducted so as idtimately to coal 
the State nothing, but, on the contrary, it will be a source of profit 
to. the Asylum* 

There is no feature of this Institution which can be compared with 
provisions in other similar establishments with more satbfaction, 
Ihan that which leaves the limitation of the term for which a pupil 
eriey remain in the school to the Board of Trustees. And here, let 
mo say, that I do not believe that it is possible for any man or set of 
men to fix an invariable rule upon the sulject. There ate popib 
whom it would not be expedient to retain in an Asylnm more than 



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re years; aiid» there m.iy be a few to whom it is impoisibld to com« 
lunicate a thorough education, whom it may not be proper to retain 
>t even that period. Again* there are those who beii^ sent to the , 
istitution younger tlian the usual average, ought to remain a much 
mger period* The mutual advantage of the school and the pupil 
re the considerations which should govern ; and never should a pro* 
ibition be inserted in the organic hiw ot an Asylum, forbidding the 
^ntinuaace of a pupil beyond a specific period. On the score of 
lonomy, even, it is scarcely necessary, for the longer the pupil re- 
mins in'the Institotion the mote nearly 'does he support himselC 
'here are pupils in oor own establishment, at the present time,^who» 
i the a^fregate, after balancing all accounts, are no expense to the 
tate, but on the contrary really coQiribute to its pecuniary advent- 
ge, by their faithful exertions during the houn appropriated lo labor, 
lore than the cost of their board and taition. Were it neeessftry . 
le names of such pupib could be given, all of our officers %eing per- 
ictly eognizant of the fac^ in the cases, These helpful i^upils am 
Imost entirely found among those of an advanced standing. When 
re consider that the Asylum is the home of the unfortunate mute, in 
)o sense in which no other place is, that his happiest days are here 
pent, that here is the bright oasis to which in future life hia thoughts, ^ 
is fondest recollections will revert, it would seem hard to require 
im to leave the school with his education but half complete, merely 
ecause some higher power was frightened at the expense likely to be 
icurred. And, while penning these lines it aflfords me unspeakable 
itisfaction to know, that in Indiana, public sentiment with deep 
irilling sympathy sustains the Legislative policy on this important 
ibject. 

So far as the public is concerned then, the proper provision baa been £ 
lade. A,iid, considering the high advantages bestowed on motes a^ ' 
mding the school, it would be oatmral to Mppose that they would be 
Mitinoed here until a good education had been acquired. Nor is it 
nially the fairit of tiie children fliemselvis, that they are kept at 
ome. The fault ie in most cases ehaifiabie where it ought to be 
ast expeoted, to parents. While a laige majority of parents are 
Bserving of much praise for' the prompt manner in which they re* 
irn their chiUren to the school, there are some who manifest a pre* 
isely contrary spirit. After tfie fimt sessiaa or two, they bsgia to 



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inqoirdy '^bow tfoon will it do to take ttiy child frdbi school f* And tkife 
moment the child can be persuaded to stay at home, he is retiiinod 
away ; not* that the parent is dissatisfied with the school nor disap. 
pointed in the rapidity with which the child improves, but simply 
because he wants that unfortunate one at home, for the same reason 
be has his ox there, to labor. Let it be understood, the instances of 
which I speak are rare, very rare, but they are not the less annoying 
when they do occur, h b perfectly certain some remedy alKHiid be 
applied. The evil complained of is one by no means pecoliar t0€nr 
ichooK Its effects are experienced in every Inslitntion witli which I 
am acquaint^, and perhaps l«s here than to most olber eetabUsh* 
meats of the kind. Sock conduct on the part of parents and gnaidiaas 
is wholly without excuse} and, considering the provisiMi here made 
for mute education, a downrigbt insult to the magnanimous libeFslity 
of the State. That parents in such Instances, should be made to re* 
fund the eitfpenses ioonrred la tbe partial educatiOQ of tke obild, if 
beyond all 4oubt just and proper. 

Somewhat akin to the period of continuance in school, and the 
various cirumstances which should increase or lessen it, is theconsid* 
oration of who are the (it subjects for admission to the advantages of 
the Institution. Supported as this Asylum is, at the general expanse 
of the people of the State, it is evident that the rules for admissioa 
should be both comprehensive in their provisions, and liberally con- 
strued; that persons of all portions of the Commonwealth niay 
be equally benefitted. Every MiUe who may be ben^Ued ttUhmU 
injury to the Instiiuiiont should be admitted. No person should be 
refused admission on the ground of too great age, if his reception 
would come within purview of the principle just recited. After 
Viany years constant hUerceurae with Mules, studying tiieir charac* 
fers, mental babils, the aaode of their Instruction, their tempeia- 
medts, capabilities for aoqoiria^ etc, I candidly confiBis my utiaff 
inabltlty to fix an opward limit of age, beyond wfaiofa no one aboiid 
be received.-«nd under wMoh all of good nnndaskoukl be.tae^o. 
An enkrged epirit of benevoleiioe wonkl seefi to say, **JLet all, if 
poesible, have a trial;'* The casis of a poor, uneducated Mate, paae> 
ing' through life, dragging out the kmg days, monthi, aad yeais of 
wearisome existence, an alien in his father's house, and a stral^gBr 
amilng fait' own kindnd, kaowhig aot the joyi of social iatercourae, 
tbe kindly sympathies of Iriends, tbe hopes of heaven, or the terroia 



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»9» 

Iff a eomliig judgment, deeqoing himself ^nd the huiaan race, but la 
the brutes that perisb» his case, I say, is too piteous to be condemned 
with a crowd unheard, merely because bis age, ^y a few days ey« 
ceeds the period fixed by a senseless, though unalterable law, for his 
feception of the advantages, the {positive bliss of an education. 

The near approach of the time when some of our pupils are to 
leave the walls of the happy Asylnm, to return no more, reminds 
me of a duty I would not fail to perform, in bespeaking for them, 
from the citizens of the State, the same kindly interest in their wel- 
fare which has been shown towards them during their continuance 
here. Nor can I feel when the appeal is made to a people so pro- 
verbial for their kindness to the Mute, as are those of Indiana, that 
my words, however short the^ may come of placing the matter in 
its true light, will fall utterly unregarded. Attached as we become 
as Instructors and Officers of the Asylian to our Pupils, during their 
DDatinnaQoe with us, conscious as we are, of the many trials and 
temptations to which they will besulgect, we may wf^ll be permitted 
tp daim iodulge&ce upon this point. 

Let it be remembered, that our Pupils leave our care when not 
men and women, but when, so far as most are concerned, mere chil- 
dren. It is true, their physical systems are in most cases, nearly 
developed, when their course here is ended. Biit they have little 
experience in the ways of the world, in its conventional forms, or in 
its more minute rules of propriety. The principles of the moral 
law, they of course, understand; and they will, in general, be found 
very careful in regard to infringing upon the rights of others. Still 
they must not be expected to conduct themselves on all occasions, 
with all that scrupulous punctilio which marks the intercourse of the 
0K)8t refined society. Usually kind-hearted and affectionate, they« 
ataad in little danger of wanting for friends among their most inti- 
Aiate aoqnaintances, but they may kek needful sympathy, in the 
oipre extended eivofe of those who only parlially know them. 
Though aaiong those with whom they are daily asMciated, they gM^ 
erally find friends, still they meet thoae who but illy deserve that 
Ultfe. Thoughtless persons who wiU amuse themselves by laughing al 
their errors, taunting them for their mistakes, or who will seek most 
«ruel delight in provoking their anger, are their moat dangerous aa- 
•oeiates. From such assodations tl|e friends of educated Mutei 



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SM 

diould draw them, as from consuming fire. Hie person who wodkl 
thos treat an unfortunate Mute, has but little sense, or a most malig- 
nantly cruel heart. Let such a person know, let the community in 
which such a transaction occurs know, that this kind of treatment 
inflicts an injury on the poor Mute which it may be impossiUe to 
repair. Having but little intercouxBe with the world, he broods over 
bis wrong, unchecked by the reascming of others, until his passions 
rise to a fearful height To the injury or insult, his excited feelings 
add a thousand aggravating circumstances; and, he imagines himself 
the victim of premeditated and inexcusable injustice. How much 
more humane, bow much more like carrying out the golden rule, 
** Whatsoever ye would that men should do unto you, do ye even so 
to them,'' would it be, to win the (confidence of the lovely unfortu- 
nate by kindness, and lead him by judicious and gentle influences, in 
the path of happiness and peace. 

Again, let me respectfiitly entrett the moral and reiigioue, on ail 
occasions to admhiister a kind reproof, when a Deaf Mute departs 
from the path of rectitude to do any wrong. Atxnistomed as he is, 
while here, to respect virtue, and abhor vice, a chord may easily be 
found to which bis whole soul and being will vibrate. On« wrong 
act should not cause you to give up the attempt to benefit him. If 
there was ever a truth of Holy Writ exemplified, it is this in the life 
of a Mute : ^Train up a child in the way he should go, and when 
he is old, he will not forsake it." However far he may have gone, 
his school instructions will not, cannot be forgotten. They form a 
foundation upon which the superstructure of morality and virtue may 
be secured; and let not the moral and the pious give over their eflbrts 
to win the wanderer back. . 

Again, there is danger, that the Deaf and Dumb may, on leaving 
school, form the habit of spending the sabbath improperly. As wbiis 
they are at church they understand little of what b going on, soms 
are apt to choose the company of those who will conTerse wilk 
them, whether good, or bad. Thns, they may be led far away from 
religious, not to say moral influences; and the most disastrous cod> 
sequences may follow. Fully aware of the danger to which they 
lire to be exposed upon this point, the ofllcers of this Asylum faavs 
tried to impress <hi the minds of the pupils a due r^ard for the saoe> 
ity of the Sabbath, and the importance of their attending some placi 



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of wmbip on that day, reading proper boobt; and if society is soughtt 
the necasity of anoctating vith the moral and the good. Let as 
then* respeetfnny entreat those who feel an interest in them, to look 
titer tfam welfare in these important particulars. 

Upon 119 class of penoos does the kind of books which they read 
exercise nich an influence as on the educated Deaf and Dumb. £x- 
clodedy to so great an extent, from the society g[ others, the (Mrocest 
of conversation by writing or spelling on the fingem being so sloVf 
books which they can understand are read with the greatest satisfac- 
tion. Reading supplies the lack of conversation; and well worn 
volumes fill the places of cheerful companions. Who would expect 
a youth spendmg most of his time in the company of felons, to be a 
virtuous omamdttt of sodetyt It is just as futile to expect a mute 
who daily reads improper or vicious books, to become an honorable, 
and useful citiaen. Parents, guardians, and friends should be ex- 
ceedingly guarded in the kind of reading they provide for the DeaC 
and Dumb. Hundreds of books that might be named which would 
produce but slight effects on others, will prove (k>sitive]y injurious to 
them. A mute reads no work which he fully understands, without 
drinking in much of it its spfait, and living over in imagination the 
scenes which it depicts. 

I cannot too highly recommend the learning of the manual alphabet 
by those who may have mute friends. While I entirely discard the 
idea of its having, as some of late seem to suppose, any important 
iofluence in communicating to the young in general a knowledge of 
orthc^raphy, still it is a moat hapyy circumstance for a gradoate of 
the Asylum, on returning home to find those who can in this way 
converse with him. Friends and relatives who can thus communicate 
^th him are Uar more highly esteemed than those who cannot. And 
they have a redoubled power to influence him to good, or to eviL 
He who oT^ercises this influence so as to promote the virtue and hap- 
piness of the lonely one, will find his reward in the testimony of his 
own conscience, and the smiles of approving Heaven. . 

As our pupils leave their peaceful home in the Asylum for the 
''^t exciting, and trying scenes of their future lives, we trust tbej , 
ouiy still be the objects of the kind regards of the benevolent and 
humane. The attentions bestowed upon them will usually be grate- 



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m 

fally received, waA mil so much teod to their pra«|>erity «ai hip- 
. pioesBy that those who strive to do them good may ^ afraiedy hj 
their own observation, that their efforts are not in vain. Tliefnat- 
est blessing we could wish to follow our pupils us they finally defwt 
from the walls of their Alma Mater, is that they may find kind mi 
judicious friends, who will ever encourage them in the paib of 
rectitude and virtue, and who fail not to warn them of the ruinoa 
consequences whidi will attend any improper course they may be 
. tempted to pursue. 

It affords me pleasure to bear testimony to the good condiict, icaL 
. and efficiency of the Officers associated with me in carrying forwaul 
the operations of the Asylum. Messrs. Wu<i«abi>, Axtbu., and Has- 
SON have discharged their duties as Instructors, in a manner bolk 
creditable to themselves, and profitable to the pupils. Messrs. Wur 
LiAM H. DsMoTTSt and Jbrbmiah Tinolby entered on their dotin 
as Teachers, at the commencement of the present session. Tbey aie 
successfully mastering the difficulties and idioms of the sign langoigs; 
and seem likely to become efficient co-laborers, in our imponut 
work. 

- Miss Li7CY Jambsok, our present Matron, has manifested a kindly 
interest in the welfare of the pupils, and, as &r as she was able, p> 
..^noted the interests of the Asylum. 

The pupils have, as heretofore, been much indebted for kind attsa- 
tions in sickness to their skillful Physician Prof. I^vinostoh DiTituir, 
M. D. His successful treatment of disease has been gratifying to tke 
Inmates of the Asylum, and to the parents of the scholars. 

Allow, Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees, a full heart to exprev 
the gratitude which I feel for the efficient aid and support which hai 
been so long ac(5brded me by your honorable Body. Among the 
most gloomy anticipations of the future, is that a time when withi 
Board less wise and concordant in council than yourselves, I msj 
be called to discharge the responsible duties which it has been yov 
pleasure to impose. I may scarcely hope sic dim, sic semper ; stiS 
H Will require a succession of years, for any Board to madly tear cf 
, the broad foundations for the future increase and prosperity of tb 
Asylum, which you have so securely laid. 

And b conclusion,6entlemen of the Board of Trastees, pamitae 



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» eoograittbtt ymf mmi ihrn^ yoo ib» Hm. Geaer*! AsseinUy^ 
n tfaft Utherlo pfospefoini ooufMi which hu bMm vooehtaibfl tl^ 
0oble. eatarprise in whieh we are engaged. Nine yeera ego, no 
ohooifor the mate existed in Indisna. Tlie beneToJenttn other 
Itetes, when es)nd if there was no hope of toccesdally establisbiag 
la Asylum here, dared not encourage the entorprise. ** The Staler'' 
hey aaidt '* was too young, the population to sparse to saslainia 
chool/* They looked forward to a period, a quarter of a ceoloey 
\i least 4iBAanti ae.the proper onefor taking the initiatory steps, fint 
he geueroue pAople of. Indhma had nat so willed it Though deHi- 
ute of any endowmeut for the purpose; a favor which hed by. acts 
>{ Congress been extetided to severel States,- though none froei 
kbroad caine to plead for the Deaf aod Duinb» though w«ghed tofh^ 
iarth by a crushing foreign debt, in her day of advefsity with nwe 
;e counsel her hut her own generous ionpulses, Indiana reipembeiifld 
lor mute ehildreu. As a taint seinblence of a school appeared on the 
nTabash, a specific tai(, the first of the kind in the worlds was levied 
Ml the grand duplicate of the State to defray the expenses of an Asy- 
um. From liake Michigan to the Ohio Riyer, from the .eastem 
boundary to the prairies ol Illinois, not a matt mni;mured. Vf^\ 
ffiid the Patriarch of Afnerican Mute Asylums, as the big tsar treo^- 
sled in his eye, bespe^kiug emotions to deep for uUfimncf^^ '^ CM 
jBillble99 Mima.'' 

The I5th day of January, 1846, was a dark but a proud day for 
the State. *< A Bill permanently locating the Deaf and Dumb Asy- 
lum and making an appropriation for the purchase of a site for the 
Buildings,** and another '' Providing for the erection of the Lunatic 
Asylum,** had passed the Senate, and were in the hands of the Com- 
mittee on Education in the House of Representatives* And on the 
table, awaiting its third reading lay the great measu]^ of the session^ 
'^ An act to provide for the funded debt of Indiana.** Yet further, on 
the same table, in a message from the Senate was, ^ A Bill to provide 
Tor educating the indigent Blind of this State** The agent of our 
(creditors, like an inexorable bailiff, was demanding jestice for his cli- 
ents ; while in suppliant posture the Deaf and Dumb, the Lunatic and 
the Blind knelt, and prayed for some alleviation of their sad condi- 
tion. If the State should be just, how could she be generous? If 
the were genetous, how could she he J4»t7 These four ly^ewafes it 
seemed, could not pass ; some one, if not all of Ihenw^iseai being press* 



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ad in sach ok>M coQn«otioii| appotred dM>OMi to fail But tte 
people's BepraaentativM noUy met tha eriu. Ob the aam day ik 
first three Bills were pasMd. On tlie next ib» one i& ngud tolk 
Blind, as sopn as it ooald be reached^ was read three iiauBh ^t^ 
acted, without a dissmting TiMce. So faras three^atksstioftkBN 
measures were coacemed, not a man throogboot the teogtk lai 
breadth of the State, was found to censure the action. Bat the g» 
erous purposes of the State were not yet accoiD|riiBhed. In om^ 
ance with the costom in other States, colificatee of poverty vere re- 
quired of those who would share the State bounty, /a 1848 tkim 
of the AstfJumSffor Mutes^ for the BUnd^and for iMnaties wm 
thrown open to oil ; thai their blessings^ like the raintandieaif 
Heaven^ might fredy ie$cendon these children of misfortuMt ikmgk, 
out the State f without money ^ and without price. Here, again, hdian 
among the goTemments of the civilized earth stood alone. On tb 
scroll of fame, in letters of living light, too bright for time to tarnii 
she had written Heaven's own motto: ** As ts wouu> rturonm 

SHOULD DO VHTO TOI7 DO TB EVBlf SO UNTO THCM.** NoW, in bertW 

of flourishing Institutions, she presents the school for mutes, 0DlJ!e^ 
en years from its organization, educating by one third, in proporte 
to population, more than any State in the Union, or government a 
the earth. When Marengo, Austerlitz, Jena, Borodino and Waterin 
shall be forgotten by Mankind, acts such as these shall be rememba- 
ed, and recalled, but to be honored. May we not humUy tnistftbit 
He that ruleth in the circle of the Heavenst will deigp to iMartb 
prayer which has ascended from the warm hearts of so many of our 
pupils: 

Qod blew tfia State, whoM cenerout arm tiistaiiis 

With willinf oSSnios* firMi tier nmdtag pteiai^ 

Oar hapleM band, which else in oarkeet night. 

Had ever roamed, ttnMett of seienee*t Kght ; 

Had never learned thy preeiona Word to love. 

Or hoped to reet within thy oonrti above. 

With golden harreata let her fielda be crowned. 

While peace and plenty spread their joya aroand. 

Ood of all nations, grant lier sons may live, ' 

For her, and Thee alone. And wilt then ffivo. 

When earth no more its annual eircnit rolls. 

And angel's hand Uio Knell of ruin toUs, 

A pemeefiU end wUk ftr^ 9]^emdon emmtd 

Blow Ltr Bn amb or siinni ckohblk to thb omvmb. 

Respectfully submitted: 

JAMES S. BROWN. 
Asylum for the Deaf and Duwh^ \ 
InBiAjiAMiis, Dee. 30th, 18S0. \ 



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Ml 

N. B. It affords me much plaasuret in behalf of the 'Pupila, %o 
ender to the generous Editors and Poblishtrs of the following Joom- 
Js, our most grateful thanks for the copies which they have gratuit- 
ously sent to the Asylum. The perusal of these periodicals has af- 
brded our scholars much sati^ction ; and they respectfully ask 
hese gentlemen who may live at a distance, never to visit Indianap* 
ilis, without coming to the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb; as 
hey will put on their brightest smiles, and try their best to interest 
uch kind benefactors. 

ones's Vineennes Senthiel, Richmond Palladium, 
ndiana State Journal, [Tri- Weekly,] Lafayette Weekly Journal, 

^incennes Gazette, Indiana American, 
udiana State Sentinel, [Semi- Weekly,JCambridge Reveille, 

)ecatur Clarion, Logansport Teleffraph, 

ladison Weekly Courier, Wayne County W hig, 

''ort Wayne Times, People's Friend> 

iIoDtgomery Journal, St. Joseph Valley Register, 

^afayette Courier, New Albany Ledger, 

larrison Gazette, Indiana Register, 

)emocralic Pharos, Fort Wajrne Sentinel, 

Vashington Democrat, Indiana Sinial, 

Ddiana Whig, Christian Record, 

Vhite Water Valley, Danville Weekly Advertiser, 

Vabash Atlas, Yanderbuig Democrat, 

)emocratic Clarion, White River Standard, 

odiana Statesman, Anderson Gazette, 

''amily Visitor, Home MisceDany. 

The following have been forwarded us from without the State, for 
rhich their Editors will please accept our thanks: 

Masonic Review, (Cincinnati,) 
Western Christian Advocate, (Cincinnati,) 
Central Christian Herald, do 

. Christian Age» do 

Boatman's Magazine, (Cleveland, O.) 

Several of these Journals have favorably noticed the Asylum, for 
rhich their Editors have our thanks; as thus a knowledge of its op- 
rations has been more widely diffused. 

JAMES S. BROWN. 



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PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Deaf and Dumb Asylum : 

Gentlbmek: — In compliance with the requiremenis of the Board» 
and in conformity to the custom of other Institutions of similar 
character, I submit the following report, for the term commencing 
in Novembefi 1849, and extending to the 31st of December, 1850. 

Except in vacaticm there have been in attendance one hundred 
pupils, residents of nearly every county in the State. They are gen- 
erally possessed of good constitutions, but the change in their accus- 
tomed habits, and mode of living upon coming to the institution, is 
in many cases deleterious to health, the most of them having beeo 
accustomed to athletic exercise, and perhaps to hard labor. 

The change to the sedentary life of the student has in some in- 
st.inces gradually enervated the constitution of the pupils; resulting 
in temporary illness. The want of room and the unsuitable construc- 
tion of the house occupied have been fruitful sources of indisposition. 
The crowded and illy vent ilia ted sleeping apartments, unhealthy at 
all times, and more particularly so during the heat of summer, disease 
was often traceable to this cause, and it always retarded convales! 
cetice in those attacked. 

It is proper to state that the Suf^rintendent took all occasions to 
avoid these difficulties by encouraging exercise in the open air after 
school hours — but these eflects could not be entiraly warded off; 
and a majority of the pupils were indisposed at one time and anoth- 
er during the year. 

During the months of January and February from twenty-five to 
thirty of the pupils were attacked v^ ith cattarrhal pneumonia, a dis- 
ease which prevailed in the city at that time; and notwithstanding 
the disadvantages to which they were by necessity compelled to sub- 
mit, and which were in part obviated by the kind services in the 
way of nursing by the officers of the Institution, and although the 



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353 

Eittacks vrere severe in almost every instance, all recovered except 
William Buchanan or Switzerland county, who died April 15th from 
eflusion in the chest. 

April and May were comparatively healthy, no severe cases hap- 
pening; and every indisposition readily yielding to judicious dieting» 
and an occasional dose of medicine. 

The pupils in the months of June and July were frequently at- 
tacked with the prevailing diseases of the country, the Intermittent 
and Remittent fevers; and often with a tendency to Dysentery and 
Cholera-morbus; particularly the la ter, among those that remained 
through the vacation in August and September. None of these 
cases were of long duiution; and all readily yielding to remedial 
agents. During the remaining months the pupils have enjoyed as 
good health as our citizens generally ; and probably as good as the 
residents of any place in the St te. 

It remains to record a few casualties which cannot bo said to be- 
long to any locality; but ^re incident to all places. Some time in 
April, William G. Enochs was severely wounded with the blade of 
an axe by his comrade, while in the act of splitting wood on the 
farm — at which place the pupils performed considerable labor in sup* 
plying fuel for the Asylum. The blade severed the muscles and 
blood-vessels at the front part of the thigh, and a short distance above 
the knee; and passed obliquely down into the capsule of the joint. 
By the assistance of my fiiend Dr. Bobbs, the wound was dressed; 
and several arteries were taken up and secured by ligatures. The 
wound healed kindly; and after several weeks the boy was sent 
home. On bis late return to the Institution, I discover no other 
damage sustained in consequence of the wound, than a slight stiflTness 
of the knee joint. 

In the latter part of May, Francis A. Crompton of Atlica, while 
passing from the city to the farm, fell from a foot-bridge and injured 
the elbow joint. I was called to see him about an hour after the ac- 
cident; but the tumefaction surrounding the joint, rendered it quite 
imposi$ible to form a correct opinion of the nature and extent of the 
injury. It was thought expedient to first subdue the inflammation by 
repose and discutient remedies; and thij was accomplished in a 
few days — when by a subsequent examination it was discovered to 



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be a dislocatioD* On makiDg extension for the purpose of reduc- 
tion, the pain was so extreme, that it was thought advisable to ad- 
minister chlorororm, which was done, and by the aid of a number of 
the professional gentlemen of the city, the dislocation was redoced, 
but not without some considerable difficulty. The arm was soob 
entirely restored to perfect use and strength. 

, In December a fraction occurred in the arm of Thomas J. GomptoD 
of Elkhart county, which is nearly or quite well. This accident 
was occasioned by a fall on the frozen ground. 

It remains for m^e to make a few remarks in relation to the future 
prospects of the health of the school. The pupils being removed to 
the new aad commodious building situated on the farm, will have 
pure air, and an ample field for recreation, and the practice of gym- 
nastic exercises; and it is believed, the change must result in invigo- 
rating their constitutions, or at least in counteracting the efiects of 
their confinement in school. The dormitories are la ge and well 
veatillated ; and each pupil has a separate bed, or mattress, which 
will likewise conduce to their health ; and it is not unreasonable to 
predict, that during the coming year, health will be much improved. 

I would surest the propriety of simplifying the mode of livings 
that more of a v^table diet should be adopted, and in a grett 
measure coffee and tea be dispensed with. In my opinion except on 
particular occasions, meat should not be used for breakfast or for 
iupper, buti vegetables — and for drink, water or milk; this last arti- 
cle should be had in great abundance on the farm. The table at 
dinner should be amply supplied, not only with vegetables, but with 
meats. Without an arrangement of this kind, there is every reason 
to believe that the pupils will not be as healthy as they should be. 

To preserve health there is no class of persons, who require so 
much watchfulness and care as the youth, and particularly in board- 
ing houses, where they are congregated in great numbers, and con- 
sequently a predisposition is induced in their systems, to invite any 
disease or epidemic that may be prevailing. Here indulgence in 
food clogs the bodily functions and blunts and stufiefies the mind, 
rendering the pupil unable to make that progress that he otherwise 
would, under the restrictions of temperance in eating. Personal 
cleanliness should be another part of our discipline, and I would siifg- 
gest that every pupil both male and female be required to sponge 



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3S& 

tlie whole body with cold water, or water at least below the torn- 
peratare of the body» early in the morning once a week, and rubbing 
dry with a coarse napkin, provided it is not contraindicated by in- 
disposition. It womM be a great proeervative to health, and not only 
invigorate the system, but fortify the surface which is so much ex*^ 
poaed to every change of temperature in the atmosphere, one of 
the most prolific sources of disease. 

It becomes my duty as it is a pleasure to state that the pupils when 
«ick have been carefully nursed and cared for by the Superintendent 
and the Matron, and that my professional efforts have at all times 
received that prompt assistance which is required from these officers 
^ the Institution. L. DUNLAP, 

Physici€tn t^ike Deaf and Dumb Aiyhm. 

Indianapolis, Dec. 31, 1850. 



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BUILDING COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees: 

Gentlbmbut: — Your Buildtng Committee would respectfully ie> 
portt that during the past year the work under their ch&i^ ins 
progressed so rapidly, that, on the 2d day of October, the new Bui- 
dings were occupied by the school. 

It has required the most strenuous exertions on the part of your 
Committee, the Architect, and the Contractors to effect this object 
Mr. Joseph Willis resigned his situation as Architect on the 18di 
of June last, and the vacancy was supplied by the appointment of 
Col. Andrew Brouse of this city. As far as his health would admit, 
be has faithfully discharged his duties, and has most materially assis- 
te in bringing the work forward with so much rapidity. Our Car- 
penter Contractor, Messrs. Colestock and Vandegrift deserve muck 
credit for the energy displayed in carrying on their important con- 
tract, as well as for the substantial and workmanlike manner m 
which every part of it has been constructed. With less energetic 
and enterprising Contractors, the occupancy of the Buildings wouU 
have been much longer delayed. As it is, the school was removed, 
in consequence, to the Buildings three months before the time stipula- 
ted for the completion of the work. Mr. James Turner, the Con- 
tractor for the masonry has also promptly performed the work ne- 
cessary in the construction of the portico, and the brick work of the 
furnaces, to the satisfaction of your Committee. Messrs. Watsos 
Voorhees & Co., and Messrs. C. & J. Cox have executed the cast- 
ings, and the copper and sheet iron work in a manner highly credit- 
able to their respective firms. 

Your Committee have, by your direction, anticipated on temporaij 
loan, and paid out to contractors, (as will be seen on comparing oar 
Abstract and that of the Superintendent with the Treasurer's A^ 
count,) a considerable portion of the revenue of 1850, which was bj 



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257 

act of the last Legblature* appropriated to the Deaf and DUmb Asy- 
lum. Certificates for work yet outstanding, together with what will 
be due on work still progressing, will amount to some $13»000» 
which, added to the amount already anticipated, will leave, as a baU 
anee of the Revenue of 1850 an amount too small to sustain the 
school during the coming year. The continuance of the present rate 
of revenue, however, will secure the uninterrupted operation of the 
School, during the year. It will be readily perceived that the unex- 
pectedly large number of pupils in the Asylum, has rendered it im- 
practicable for you to devote so large a portion of the revenue to 
building purposes, as the exigencies of the case demanded : and, in 
consequence, your Committee have found themselves embarrassed, 
scarcely knowing at times whence innds were to be obtainod to meet 
the pressing wants of the Contractors. These gentlemen, however, 
to their praise be it said, have manifested the best possible spirit, a$d 
have, in several instances, waited on us, without complaint, beyoad 
the period specified for payment. 

Of all expenses incurred, and of all moneys paid out, accurate ao 

counts, sustained by legal and explicit vouchers, have been kopt. 

These accounts and vouchers are at all times open for the inspection 

of the Executive of the State, the Members of the Legislature, or 

the humblest citizen who may desire to examine them. The ac* 

companying abstract contains a statement of the amounts received 

and paid out by your ConHnittee, during the financial year commene- 

ing Nov. 1, 1849, and ending Oct. 31, 1850. 

ALFERD HARRISON, ) «., .,.- ^ 
L. DUNLAP, [ ^^2^ 

J. S. BROWN, ) CammiUee. 

hoiANAPOua, Nor. 1, 1850. 



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ADMISSION OF PUPILS, &C. 



L All the Deaf and Dumb of the State, between the ages of ten 
and thirty years, are entitled to an education, without charge for 
board or tuition, in thi^r Institution. No certificate of any kind ie 
required for admission. Persons, however, desirous of placing a 
pupil in the school, should write to the Superintendent, informing 
him of the name, age, residence of the mute, the cause, if any, of 
deafness, &c. The Superintendent will immediately answer, stating 
the time when the pupil will be received. This course is in all cases 
recommended, though none will be refused who come at the com- 
mencemeat of the session. Applications in behalf of persons of 
more or less than the required age, will be considered by the Trus» •> 
tees, who reserve to themselves the right to accept or reject such 
applicants, as they may deem just and proper. 

II. The length of the course of instruction is five years; and, 
that the pupils may become more proficient in their studies, they 
are allowed and advised to remain one year more. At the end of 
six years, the Superintendent may select such pupils as he may con- 
sider would be particularly benefited by continuing longer at school; 
and if approved by the Board of Trustees, they shall be permitted . 
to remain an additional year. ^ 

III. The Trustees being by Statute of the General Assembly, 
constituted the judges as to what persons should be educated ftee of 
txpense^ have determined that none are proper recipients of the 
bounty of the State, in this particular, who do not remain in the 
Asylum five years, unless expressly excused by the Board. 



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263 

IV. It is the intention of the Trustees to render the Institation 
self-supportingy so far as practicable, and that every pupil on letv- 
ing its walls, shall be so proficient in some useful occupation er 
trade, as to be able to procure a livelihood, without reliance on dia 
charities of others. In accordance with this design, all the scholiif 
will be required to labor a portion of each day, the girls in perfona- 
tng the lighter kinds of house-work, and in various kinds of needb 
work, as plain sewing, ornamental work, dress-makipg, or millenery, 
6u:.; and the boy» at various trades, the necessary work about the 
Asylum, and the cultivation of the farm and garden. 

y. The annual sessions of the school continue ten months, com- 
tnencing on the first Wednesday in October, and closing on the last 
Wednesday in July. Every pupil is to come prompiy an or befan 
the Jirst day of the session^ and is to remain until the last day oftht 
same. The only exceptions allowed are cases of sickness. 

VL No pupil, unless under extraordinary drcumstances, can be 
received at any other time than the commencement of the eessMt 

VII. Parents and Guardians are required to furnish annnally It 
each pupil, the following supply of clothing : 

FOR THE MALE PUPIL& 

WINTER CLOTHING. SUMMER CLOTHnCO. 

% CmH, 5 Pain of Sockf , S Cwlt, 

t Viita, 1 Vwa of Boolit 9 VooCi, 

i Pain of Puililoooa. 9 Pain of Sheet, 3 Pain of PaBt»lns%- 

SShirta, 9 Hata, or t flat and 1 Cqi, 1 FklaiplMf HnU 

ADDITIONAL ARTICLES. 
9 Irory Combs, 
9P^ttriof WoodottComte. 
9 Pain of Suapenden, 
9 Pocket Han«lkoi€hie& 

FOR THE FEMALE PUPILS. 

t •r 4 Calieo DrMBw, 9 or 3 clianra of underclothing, 9 NI^I*Ooira«, 

1 Woolen or worrted draoa, 9 Pain of Samroer Stockin^h 3 Pkin of 8hoen» 
I Snnday and 1 Sun Bonnet, 9 Plain of Winter Stockings, 3 Pocket Ilandkanliiift 

AIXDITIONAL ARTM^USS. 

1 Shawl, 

9 Hair Combs, 

1 CMpenod 9 iroffy GMoto^ 

In addition to the above outfit, a sum of not less than $3.00 is fo 
be deposited with the Superintendent for incidental expenses, repair 



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S6S 

of ahoest &c; any part of which remaining unexpended vill be ro* 
tomed at the close of the session. 

It is not intended that the clothing should be of aa expensive 
kind. For Boys* winter apparel» plain home-made cloth is sufficient- 
ly good. For summer wear» country linen will answer for panl% 
with some kind of dark goods or prints for coats and vests* GirlsP 
calico dresses may be made of a cheap article which will not fade; 
and while for older girls, at least, one; pair of morocco shoes should 
be furnished, one or both' the other pairs should be of good calf-skin. 
On all articles of clothing which it is possible to mark, the full nama 
of the pupil should be written with indeliblo ink. Each pupil should 
be supplied with a trunk or chest 

YIIT* In cases of extreme povwty, pupils are clothed by the 
Asylum. Such inMances are^ howevtr^ expected to he very rare. 

IX. All business letters, or letters of inquiry in regard to pupils 
in the Asylum or those whom it may be designed to place hereb 
should be addressed to *« Jambs S. Bbown, Superintendenif Insiiiutiom 
for the Deaf oMd Dumbf IndianapolisJ* All letters for pupils mosl 
be pre-paid, and contain the words, **Instituiion far the Deaf and 
Dwmbf^ as a part of their direction. 



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364 



MANUAL ALPHABET AND NUMERALS 




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365 



FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB. 



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Doc. No. 5.j [Part. II. 

; REPORT 



OFTHB 



STATE LIBRARIAN. 



TOTRB 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

I. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 
1851. 

3D97 



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REPORT. 



STATE LIBRARY, ) 

iRBIAHAPOUSy Nov. 1, 1850. \ 

^0 the Cfeneral Assembly of the State of Indiana: 

The State Librarian respectfully makes the following Report to 
le Legislature of the State of Indiana, 

The works mentioned in the following Ijst, with the prices an- 
exedy have been added to the State Library since the Slst of Octo- 
er, 1849: 

ruden's Concordance ; 1 Vol., 8 vo, <M W> 

institutions of the several States; 2 copies, 2 00 

Vebster*s Diplomatic Papers; 1 VoL, 8 vo, 2 25 

Vritings of Cassius M. Clay ; 1 Vol., 8 vo, 2 00 

lonquest of Canada, by Warburton; 2 Vols., 12 mo, . 2 00 

ireeley^s Reforms; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 1 25 

'ravels in Spain and Morocco, by Urguhart; 2 Vols., 12 

mo, 2 00 

[umboldt's Cosmos; 2 Vols., 12 mo, 1 75 

outhey's Common Place Book; 2 Vols., 8 vo, 2 50 

*ving's Mahomet and Successors; 2 Vols., 12 mo,« • 2 50 

Proceedings of New York Convention ; 3 copies, » 10 50 

life of John Calvinr 1 Vol., 12 mo, • • 1 00 

fackay's Popular Delusions; 2 Vols., 12 mo, 2 25 

Iryant's Letters of a Traveller; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 1 25 

[oblyn's Dictionary of Scientific Terms; 1 Vol., 12 mo,- • 1 50 

ights io the Gold Reoions; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 1 00 

l^Lean's Reports; 3 Vols., 8 vo, 15 00 

;rinan*8 Travels in Siberia; 2 Vols., 12 mo, 2 00 

^obat*s Travels in Abyssinia ; 1 Vol., 12 mo, • • 1 25 

ohnston's Physical Atlas; 1 Vol., quarto, 13 00 

Veisback's Mechanics and Engineering; 2 Vols., 8 vo,- ' • 7 50 

roceedings of Kentucky Convention; 5 Copies, 25 00 



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272 

Calmet's Phaatom World ; 1 Vol., 12 mo. $1 35 

Cumming*s Five years in Africa; 2 Vols., 12 mo, 1 75 

Constitutions of the several States; 5 copies, 5 00 

Lyell's Travels in United Slates; 2 Vols., 12 mo, 1 75 

Anthon's Ancient Geography; 1 Vol., 8 vo, 1 50 

Benjamin's Architecture; 1 Vol., 4 to, 4 25 

Cotton's Political Economy ; 1 Vol., 8 vo, 3 00 

Wilson's Notes Ambroslanae; 4 Vols., 12 mo, 4 SO 

Headley's Life of Cromwell; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 1 50 

Courayer on English Ordinations; 1 Vol., 8 vo, 3 25 

Paston Letters; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 1 00 

Lingard's Anglo-saxon Church; 1 Vol., 8 vo, 350 

Waddington's Church History; 1 Vol., 8 vo, 3 50 

Jarvis' Church History; 1 Vol., 8 vo, 3 00 

Hawkes' Egypt and its Monuments; 1 Vol., 8 vo,. • • • > . • 3 00 

American Almanac; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 1 00 

Headley's Miscellanies; 1 Vol., 12 mo,- 1 00 

Turkish Entertainments, 1 Vol., 12 mo,« •••.••« 1 00 

Los Gringos, by St. Wise ; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 1 25 

Almanac for 1850, • .. •. 13 

Barnard's Polyglot Grammar; 1 Vol., 8 vo, 3 00 

Oracle of Dauphin, (newspaper*) 1800 to 1807; 1 VoU- • • 10 00 

Ranlett'8 Architect; 2d Vol., 4 to, 600 

Revised Statutes of Indiana Territory, 1807, 10 00 

Statutes of Indiana Territory, 1810, 4 00 

GomipUation of Statutes of Indiana, 1818, 5 00 

Laws of Indiana, 1819, 3 50 

Laws of Indiana, 1823.and 1824, 5 00 

Laws of Indiana, 1837 — ^3 copies, 7 50 

Lynch's Expedition to the Dead Sea; 1 Vol., 8 vo, 3 25 

Buchanan on Mill work ; plates quarto, 2 Vols,* . « 19 SO 

Wishaw's Railways of Great Britain, &c 1100 

Loudon's Encyclopedia of Plants, 30 00 

Bradford's Notes on the North West; 1 Vol., 8 vo, 1 35 

Gray's Plants of the United States; 2 Vols., 8 vo, 13 50 

Bischoff on. Wool, Woolens, and Sheep; 2 Vols., 8 vo,» • • • 00 

Brown's Trees of America; 1 Vol., 8 vo, 5 OO 

Lindley's Flora Medica; 1 Vol^ 8 vo, 6 SO 

Matthew Carey's Works, Olive Branch, and Essays; 2 

Vols., 8 vo, :.... 6 50 

Sabine's American Loyalists; 1 Vol., 8 vo, • • • • 3 50 

Bayard Taylor's Views-a-Foot; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 185 

Gray*^ BoUny of the Northern States; 1 Vol., 8 vo, 3 00 

Southgate's. Tour through America, Persia &, Mesopota- 
mia; 2 VxJs., ISJ mo, 8 50 

Kennedy's Life of Wirt; 2 Vols., 8 vo, 5 OO 

American .Conelitations; 1 Vol., 12 mo, •• • • ^i 

Montgomery on Cotton Manufactures ; 1 Vol., 8 V0, 3 OO 



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773 

Indiana Gazetteer; 1 Vol., 12 mo, f 1 50 

Ripley's History of the Mexican War: 2 Vols., 8 vo, 4 00 

Janaos* Dark Scenes of History; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 1 00 

Complete works of Thomas Dick; 2 Vols., 8 vo, 4 50 

Montesquieu's Spirit of Laws; 2 Vols., 12 mo, - • • • 1 50 

Debates in Kentucky Convention,- • 5 00 

Hening's Maxims; 1 Vol., 8 vo, • 2 75 

Smith's Indiana Reports; 1 Vol., 8 vo,- • • • 3 SO 

A Mixed Dish from Mexico; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 1 00 

Biography of Madison and Monroe; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 1 25 

Colton's Deck and Port; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 1 25 

Overman on the Manufacture of Iron; I Vol., 8 vo, 5 50 

Three years in California, by Colton ; 1 Vol., 12 mo, 1 25 

American Review, for one year, 5 00 

Louisville Examiner, for one year, 2 00 

Commercial Review, by De Bow; 4 Vols., bound, 24 00 

Washington Republic, tri- weekly, one year, 9 00 

Five Foreign Periodicals, (Edinburgh, North British, Lon- 
don Quarterly, and Westminister Reviews, and Black- 
wood's Magazine,) up to Dec. 1850, 20 00 



EXCHANGES AND DONATIONS. 

The works mentioned in the following list have been receivad at 
the State Library, since the first of November, 1849, from the Gen- 
eral Government, from different State authorities, &c. 

Barbour's N. Y. Reports; Vols., 3, 4, 5, 

Comstock's N, Y. Reports; Vol. 1, 

Laws of Iowa, 1849; 3 copies. 

Revised Statutes of Wisconsin, 1849 ; 2 copies, 

Douglass' Michigan Reports; 2 Vols. 

Laws, Journals, and Reports of Legislature of South Carofina, 
1848 ; 2 copies, 

Smedes' and Marshall's Mississippi Reports; Vol. 12, 

Laws of Connecticut, 1819; 2 copies* 

Senate Journal of Connecticut, 1849, 

Laws of Arkansas, 1849 ; 2 copies. 

Green's Iowa Reports; Vol. 1, 

Vermont Reports; Vol. 20, 

Laws of Vermont, 1849; 3 copies. 

House Journal of Iowa, 1849; 2 copies, 

Eight Legislative Reports of Michigan, 1849, 

Minot's Statutes at Large, 1845, 1846. 1847, 1848, 1849, 

Transactions of N. Y. Agricultwral Society, 1848, 1 Vol., 9 vd, 



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374 

Documentary History of New York; 1st and 2d Vols, 
Catalogue of New York State Library, 1850 ; 1 Vol., 8 vo. 
Catalogue of Law Books published by Johnsons, Philadelphia, 
Strobbart's S. C, Equity Reports, 2 Vol, 
Gilman's Illinois Reports; Vol. 5, 

Report from Deaf and Dumb Institution of New York, 1849, 
Report from Blind Institution of New York, 1849, 
Report of New York Canal Commissioners, 1849, 
Iredell's. N. C. Reports, Vol. 9, 
Laws of Illinois, lo49; 3 copies. 

Report of Superintendent of Common Schools in Illinois, 1849, 
Halsted's Chancery Reports; Vol. 1, 
, Colonial Records of Connecticut; Vol. 1, 

Report of Finances of U. S. 1849-'50— presented by Hon. W. J. 
Brown, 
Revised Code of Virginia, 1849, 
Laws of New Jersey, 1850; 3 copies. 
Laws of Wisconsin, 1850; 2 copies, 
Journal of Senate of Maine; 1849, 
Laws of Maine; 1849, 

Maine Reports, Vols. 27 and 28, 

Catalogue of Maine State Library, 

Laws of Kentucky, 1850; 2 copies. 

House and Senate Journals of Kentucky, 1849-'50, 

Kentucky Legislative Reports, 1849-'50, 

B* Monroe's Reports; Vol. 9, 

MetcalPs Reports; Vol. 12, 

Laws of Mississippi, 1850; 2 copies. 

Annual Report of Regents of New York University, 

Laws of Virginia, 1850; 2 copies. 

Laws of Michigan, 1850, 

Laws of New Hampshire, 1850; 3 copies. 

Laws of Louisiana, 1850; 2 copies. 

Laws of New York, 1850; 3 copies, 

Laws of Alabama, 1850, 

Abstract of Banks of Rhode Island, 1849, 

Ohio Reports, Vol. 18, . 

Pogue's Florida Reports, Vol. 1, 

Laws of Ohio, 1850, 

Laws of Massachusetts, 1850; 3 copies. 

Journals of House and Senate of Mississippi, 1850, 

Pamphlet on Cannelton Manufacturing, &c. 

Report of Pennsylvania Deaf and Dumb Institution, 

Pamphlet on Trade and Commerce of Oriental Nations, 

Journals of House and Senate of New Hampshire, 1849 — ^3 copies, 

Laws of Pennsylvania, 1850, 

Laws and Loffislative Documents of South Carolina, 1849, 1 Vol, 

House Joumiu of Connecticut, 1850, 



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275 

Transactions of the American Institute of New York, 1848; 1 

Vol., 8 vo, 

Zabriskie's N. J. Reports, Vol. 1 ; 2 copies, 

Laws and Documents of Maryland, 1850, 

Laws and Documents of Maryland, 1849, 

Natural History of East and West Florida, by Captain Bernard 

Romans; printed in 1776: — presented by Thomas W. Gibson, Esq. 
Laws of Indiana Territory, 1813; Laws of Indiana, 1822; A 

compend of the Acts of Indiana, from 1807 to 1814; by Genl. W. 

Johnston : — presented by Hon. Samuel Hall, 

Executive Documents, 2d Session 30th Congress; 7 Vols: 3 copies, 
Senate Documents, 2d Session 30th Congress; 4 Vols: 3 copies. 
Report of Committees of House, 2d Siession 30th Congress; 3 

Vols: 3 copies. 

House Miscellaneous Reports, 2d Session 30th Congress; 1 Vol: 

3 copies. 

Senate Journal, 2d Session 30th Congress; 1 Vol: 3 copies. 
House Journal, 2d Session 30th Congress; 1 Vol: 3 copies. 
Senate Special Session of March, 1849; 1 Vol: 3 copies. 
Senate Miscellaneous Reports, 2d Session 30th Congress; 2 Vols: 

3 copies, *^' 

Curso de Matematicas: printed at Mexico: — presented by Hon. 

Jas. W. Borden. 



BILLS FOR REPAIRING STATE HOUSE, &c. 

Since the Slst of October, 1849, the following bills have been 
certified by the State Librarian, according to the provisions of ''an 
Act to amend the several Acts providing for the preservation of the 
State House,'* &c. — approved January 15, 1846. These bills, (a 
particular statement of which follows,) were presented and certified, 
on account of Stationery furnished for the use of the Ls^lature, 
and work done, and materials used, in repairing the Legislative halls, 
Committee rooms. Supreme Court room, State Library rooms, State 
house square, &c : 

A. A. Louden's bill for repairs on Stale house, $13 35 

M. Shea's bill for 23i days work, 33 35 

W. H. B. Douslass' bill for six days work, 6 00 

Thofl. Shea's bill for seven days work, 7 00 

SamL Hooker's bill for glazing, 37 

Peter Winchell's bill for freight on books, 3 35 

Noel & Co's. bill for candles, pitchers, tumblers, &c, 30 05 

C. & J. Cox's bill for repairing large lamp, at front gate, 5 00 



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876 

MorrisoD dt Talbott*s bill for Stationary, $5 56 

J. D. Defrees' bill for binding books, 14 63 

Morrison & Talbott's bill for Stationery, 58 80 

Tomlinson Brothers' bill for oil, 9 00 

Madison & Indianapolis Rail Road bill for freight, 2 10 

A. A. Louden's bill for repairing fence, 5 25 

Davis & Ray's bill for Stationery, 1 35 

Ross 4& Ray's bill for large book-brush, 2 00 

John McCormick's bill for pruning trees, 10 00 

M. Shea's bill for 27i days work, 27 50 

J. B. Fitter's biJl for latches for gates, 1 25 

Willis & Bradley's bill for estimates of State house repairs, 10 00 

Louden & Duffy's bill for repairing roof, 17 50 

W. H. Jones' bill for repairing pump, 50 

Blake & Kitchen's bill for Carpet, 4 95 

John P. Childers's bill for repairing, pump, 50 

Bradley & Kams' bill for making shelves, 4 33 

H. J. & B. C. Hom'to bill for Carpet, 57 51 

Linflenfelter d& Tutewilar's bill for plastering, 15 00 

M. Shea's hill for work done at State house, 33 50 

John P. Childers's bill for sinking well and repairing pimp, 3 00 

Since the 31st of October, 1849, the sum of seven dollars ao<l 
forty-five cents has been received on account of the sale of sundry 
iorplua documents not wanted for the use of the State Library. 
These documents were sold according to the provisions of <'an Act 
^nceming the State Library," approved February 12, 1848. 

JOHN B. DILLON, 

8ua$ Librarian- 



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Doc. No. 6.] [Part. II . 

V E 1» O R T 



or THC 



QUARTER MASTER GENERAL, 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



INDIANAFOLIS: 
J. P, OHAPMAR. STATl PKIHTIK. 

1851. 
3D28 



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REPORT. 



Quarter Master General's Office, ) 
iNDiANAPOuSy Dec. 16, 1850. ) 

To his Excellency^ Joseph A. Wright, 

Governor of the State of Indiana. 

Sir — I beg leave to submit the following statement relative to the 
arms belonging to the State. Since my last Annual Report there 
has been but little done in Military matters as the Military spirit has 
almost entirely gone down. Therefore there has been but little de- 
mand for arms. There have been only two companies furnished 
since my last report ; four companies have returned since my last 
report. There are at this time thirty-three Infantry companies hold- 
ing 204D muskets with their accoutrements, fifteen Rifle companies 
holding 794 rifles with their accoutrements, seven Cavalry compa- 
nies holding 778 pistols and 389 sabres. 

There are at this time old guns returned and to clean and repair 
about 400 muskets and rifles, 60 sabres with all the accoutrements, 
thereto, belonging, which will not cost the State less than six hun- 
dred dollars. This work should all be done as soon as possible, as the 
longer it is put ofi* the worse the work will be to do, and the more it 
will cost, and the greater the injury to the arms on account of rusting. 

Since my last report the following work has been done: 

Gleaned and repaired 106 muskets and rifles at 50 

cents each, 

144 pistols at 50 cents each, polished and repaired,* • • 

To repairing and making screws, 

Oiling and reboxing 107 muskets at 12i cents each,* • 

Oiling and reboxing 37 pistols at 5 cents each, 

Oiling 93 cartridge boxes at 4 cents each, 



There shouldjhave been more work done, but owing to the small 

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$53 00 


73 00 


500 


12 62 


1 85 


4 47 


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280 

appropriation by the Legislature last winter, only being two hon- 
dred dollars for transportation and repairing the arms ; we coaM 
only have that work done which seemed to require our first attention 
and which could be repaired at least expense, which will account for 
the number of arms cleaned. The work to be done will cost a great 
deal more. The mua will average at least $1.50 cents each to pat 
them in proper order. The greater part of them are in very bad order 
and require a great deal of work to put them in good order, and the 
longer the work is delayed the greater will be the expense and the 
more the injury to the arms. Therefore it would be best to have the 
repairs done as soon as possible. The work cannot be done until there 
is an appropriation made by the L^slature, which I think should be 
done this winter. 

We have at this time a very fine lot of arms in the armory, con- 
sisting of the following, all of which are in good order and mostly 
new. 

300 Muskets, Flint locks, 

180 Carbines, Percussion locks, all new, 

144 Pbtols, flint locks, repaired, 

400 New pistols, percussion locks, all new, 

300 Sabres, all new* with all the accoutrements. 



NEW A&lfS RBCmVXD THIS YXAR. 

411 Percussion muskets with their accoutrements, 
200 Rifles, percussion with accoutrements. 

This being the quota of arms for the years 1848 *49 and part of 
1850, our quota yearly is equal to 403 muskets. As the value of the 
accoutrements are taken from the number of muskets which makes 
the number much less this year; we have drawn nearly three years 
apt>ortionment and have only drawn 611 guns being equal to 
1,187 5-13 muskets. We have one six pound brass cannon at this 
place and one at Vernon, belonging to the Vernon Artillery. We 
have also two iron cannons six pounders. 

The expenses of the armory for the year, including rent for armo- 
ry, transportation and repairs have been about $325; rent alone is 
$100. The house which we have at this time is a very ordmaiy 
buildmg, not what it shouU be for the safety of the public armory, 
but it is the best 1 could get at the rent of $100. I would a^ 
recommend to your consideration the necessity of the State building 
a suitaUe house for an armory. It would not, I think, cost more than 
six or eight hundred dollars at most, which soon would be saved id 
rent, say eight years, as we pay now one hundred dollars a year. I 
think economy and safety require a good buildmg. 

Undor the present Military laws of our State it is imposuUe for 



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381 

military companies to stand long. Fines cannot be collected, and as 
long as this is the case, it is folly to attempt to sustain a company, for 
this reason, most of the companies have disbanded, and some have 
informed me their arms are subject to my order; now it would re- 
quire a considerable amount of money for me to have to pay the 
transportation of the arms to the capitol of the State, from all parts 
of the State. There should be sometning done in regard to the arms 
of those companies that have disbanded. In many cases the arms are 
scattered and likely to be destroyed. I think all companies disband- 
ing should be required by law to return their arms to the armory at 
Indianapolis, at the expense of the company. All the arms given out 
by me the last two years have been given out with the understand- 
ing that they were to be at all expense of transportation to and from 
Indianapolis, and has so far been complied with by those drawing 
the arms. I think the Legislature should take some action this win- 
ter on the subject. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Your obedient servant, 

SAMUEL BECK, 

Quarter Master General 

Indiana Militia. 



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Doc. No. 7.] [Part 11. 

THB 

ADDRESS 

Of 

COL. EBENEZER DUMONT. 

8PBAKER OF TH£ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVESt 
DKUTERBO OH PBB8B1ITUIO THB 

ADDRESS OF THE SCHOLARS 

Of THB 

DEAF AND DUMB ASYLUM. 

TO THB 

LEG ISLATUBE: 
AND ALSO THAT ADDRESS. 



5000 COPIES ORDERED TO BE PRINTED. 



IBDIAHAP0LI8: 

J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 

1851. 



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On Monov, 
Ordered: 
That there be printed of the Address of the Pupils of the Deaf 
and Dumb Asylum, and Speaker's Address on the presentation of 
said Pupils' Address, for the use of this House 4000 copies, and for 

the use of the Institute 1000 copies. 

W. R- BOWES, 
Clerk of ike House of Representatives. 



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ADDRESS. 



Qenikmen of ike Houie of Rqfresentatitfes : 

I ha?6 the honor to lay before you» the Address of the Pupils of 
the Asylum for the Deaf and Duntb. The Address was presented 
at the close of an exhibition of the Scholars, by Miss Margaret E. 
HoLDKRy an interesting and accomplished young Lady, with the re- 
quest that I should lay it before you. It is signed by ninety-one of 
the Students, and was written by Miss Mary St. C. BELcnss, whose 
name heads the list. 

The exhibition preceding the presentation of the Address, was 
one of thrilling interest. The scholars were examined in those 
branches of education taught in this school, — being all the useful and 
substantial branches of an English education, such as Arithmetic, 
Geography, History, &c. They showed a proficiency to tax the 
oreduHty of any man, not an eye witness to the fact Deprived of 
the use of ear and speech, the quickness of their other perceptions 
seemed almost to atone for these misfortunes. It has been said that 
words were made to conceal ideas ;^— whether this be true or not» 
certain it is'tbat thoughts, impulses and emotions were oonveyed by 
these Motes, as clearly, distinctly and unmistakeably as they could 
have been by the most eloquent tongue — thoughts, too, involving 
propositions of the most complex character — poetic fancies and mis- 
ehievous conceits. The exhibition was one to inspire mingled emo- 
tions of joy and grief ;-^rief for ' the misfortunes of a stricken 
group — grief for those^on whom we have been taught to loolc* as 
ehiMren of sorrow and outcasts from the world; and joy, that our 
Slate has been' succemful In bringing forward and developing a 



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890 

flower that seemed to have beeo born **to blush unseen" — that she 
has been successful in depriving a calamity of its bitterest pang. — 
giving cheerfulness for sorrow 9^-for gloom giving gladness; and 
strewing with pleasures, that which has hitherto been a cheerlen 
pathway. Bad, indeed, must be the man that could do less than re- 
joice at the success of these philanthropic efibrts; — eflforts that have 
plucked the thorn from the bleeding heart; — efibrts that have caused 
the rose to bloom on the blanched and pallid cheek ;^-effort8 that 
have lessened the parents* agony, assuaged the sister's pangs and dis- 
pelled the brother's gloom. Who will doubt that there is a rich 
harvest stored up in the garner of grateful hearts for those engaged 
in a service fraught with such results T 

Man is said to be God's noblest work ; and it follows as a necessa- 
ry result, that creations of art a^id works of gemas, liak mto Aotfnag 
nheu compared to improvements in man's physical aad ialeUectual 
machinery. To speak after the manner of onen, many a son of 
genius has won a deathless name, by giving the human form to mar- 
ble, and delineating it upon canvass, though impelled to action by so 
motive other than pelf or unchastened ambition. Though the piu- 
lanthropist seldom wins the patronage of kiugs or the homage of 
men, still as he is actuated by purer motives, I would prefer hb 
humble name and hb reward; for he who shall dry up the tear of 
affliction, who shall allay the pangs of misfortune, who shall trana* 
form a calamity into a blessing, who sbfill make life cheerful and 
soften death's pillow, shall rear a monument in the hearts of She 
good more enduring than marble^ and shall finally reap a mward 
worth all the gold of Ophii*. . Time gnaws down the statues and 
anonuments of earth; her honorB, like shadows, are evanescent; bot 
the works of the good are eternal. The good man's life is a life of 
peace, aad whan called cApoa to surrender it up, he can do it as 
trustinglyf and confidingly, as an in&nt can repose on the booon oi 
its mother. Happy is he vhoae sympathies encircle his (Mow men ; 
but miserable is he whose sympathies are pent up and confined wUk- 
in the narrow limits of self. Happy is he who weeps for othen' 
woes; but miserable and wretched, indeed, is he who baa no heart 
for pity, and no eye for tears. '*€ast thy bread qpoa the watan," 
is-a beavenly maada^e; atid to devote oae'a 4Ue iothosdrviae of oth- 
ers, is to obey it. He who lives to do^od to othora oaata his bread 
upon the waters, and ''shall find it aUter nMay dafs." Flowan 



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391 
shali be strowa in his pathway* and UesiiiigB shall chister amntiid 

hIIB. 

** Th* quality of mercy to not aUnintdt 

It droppeth as the gentle raisa from hMnwOt 

Upon the place beneath; it ia twice bieaa'd, 

It bleueth him that givea, and him that takaa; 

*Tto mlghtiaat in the migbtleal; It baoomaa 

TIm throned menarch better than hia crown; 

It to ontlironed in the hearU of kings; 

It to an attribute to God himaelf, 

And earthly power doth rfiow itaelf the moat Uko OoTa, 

Wkam morey aeeaona juatlea." 

I heai^y bava read, and now present this interesting Address, with 
the Uveliest emotions of pleasure. It is couehed in language ch(|ste 
and beautiftd, and breathes sentiments calculated to touch the teo- 
derest chord. It is an emanation from gratified hearts; and what Is 
gratitude but a flower expanding to a vernal sun, a bud opening to 
the gentle shower, a breeze that has ^)layed with the it)se, the pink 
and the violet, and stolen their perfume? Without the use of met- 
aphor for further ilhistration, it is the disposition to be just, the 
willingness to render '* value received** for benefits conferred. It 
belongs to the honest man ; it is a redeeming quality worthy of be- 
ing cherished, wherever found. Those who are strangeia to he 
inflnences, are sunk in the deepest pit of moral depravity. We 
must, however, be careful that the sentiment is not a servile one ; 
Ibr, then, ifts tendency is to degrade, and not to elevate. It should 
partake of that feeling which the child manifests for a kind and ki- 
d«ilgent parent 

A fund has been raised in Indiana for the support of this Institu- 
tion. The people pay the tax most promptly and ebeerfUIy. No 
one has been fovaid so destitute of principle as to taurmur. The 
Governor of the State, and the Judges rest under just as deep aa 
obligiidf^n as those receiving an education kt this Institotion ; for tlie 
labor of the latter is as great as that of the former, and the expenses 
of all are borne by taxing the people ; and as taxes fall equally apaa 
all, the parents of these children are not exempt It is a perpetual 
fund, and no parent knows but that in time he may reip its imme- 
diate benefits in the person of his own chitd. It is a sinking fuad» 
sinking misfortune, and elevating happiness, and its benefits are free 
and open to all. Those who now reap them will soon *^ wheel into 
the line '* in the accomplishment of man's destiny ; and entering 



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apon life's stem tealhies, #iU in tarn contribtita to its supimt 
They standy then» I contend, upon the^ame footing with the pnNri- 
est of the land ; their condition is not one of dependence, in a sense 
to mortify; for what institution is there in the ladd, whose endow- 
ment cannot be traced to National, State or individual benevolence! 
Have not the proudest defenders of our country, — the magnates of 
the land, — been educated in an institution founded and sustained by 
the Nation? Are we not indebted to national liberality for the fund 
that now sustains our State University? What is our Common 
School Fund but a magnificent bequest, the benefits of which the 
rich and the poor are willing to embrace? There b nolhiog to mor- 
tify the pride or dampen the ardor, but every thing to cheer and 
encourage. Their Institution rests upon a firm and eadariDg basis, 
their teachers have proven themselves abundantly worthy, they have 
performed labor and displayed a solicitude equalled only by the suc- 
cess with which those labors have been crowded. These yoiu^ 
men and young ladies will soon quit those peaeefel haunts and enter 
the busy throi^. They will take a position in society correspondiag 
with their moral worth, and intellectual culture. To the time spent 
in this Institution they will recur with pleasure, in their riper yeaxs. 
It was the opening to them of a sealed book* Here it was that the 
store bouses of knowledge were unlocked, and the cheering hopes of 
Religion revealed. Here it was that they were first, admitted into 
ihe full communion of their fellow men, and taught the eventful sto- 
ry of the past. Here it was that doors were opened, that would 
otherwise have remained forever closed. For these things they owe 
a debt of gratitude which time will never efiace; That debt is doe 
^o the Superintendent and Teachers, whose solicitude and toil have 
wrought auob happy results. That gratitude is expressed in the Ad- 
dress which I now present, so far as words can express such an obli- 
gation. , That those who control this Institution are equal to its 
responsibilities and worthy of the confidence of the peopte* tbe im- 
provements of which I have spoken abundantly demonstrate. No- 
thing but rare qualifications and infinite pains could produce such 
fruit. Lei us the Representatives of the people, aid ihem in cherish- 
isig and sustaining so interesting, so commendable, so praiseworthj 
en enterprize. - All that we shall do for such an Institution as this, 
within the bounds of reason* will, I know, meet the approbation of 
our ooastitucnt^ * 



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It is the pride and glorjr of our happy land, that she has never yet 
turned a deaf ear to the calls of humanity ; that she has never yet 
refused to pot forth her arm of strength, in behalf of the down 
trodden, the oppressed and the unfortunate ; that by her the arts and 
scieooes have been fostered; she has been foremost in all enierpriseB 
of benevolence ; she has edocated and given intelligence to the 
masses, and vindicated triumphantly the liberty of the piess. The 
Kberty of the press ! That is a word that oi^t not to be lightly 
epoken* It is a wocd when understood, of potent meaning; for 
prostituted and subsidized as it sometimes is, (and God has made no 
good thing that cannot be made an instrument of harm,) the press 
has beeo a messenger of glad tidiugs, bearing light and truth to the 
inhabitants of all lands, civilizing and Christianizing Earth^s darkest 
cornet's, intelligent, free and uncorrdpted, it is a friend to ifreedom, 
a scourge to tyrants, the palladium of Liberty, and the bulwork ot 
Truth. * While the press is left iree, error of opinion may be tolera- 
ted ; for it. will be speedily vanquished by the triumph of sound prin- 
ciples. The influence of the press upon this broad land is not se^n 
at a glance. It is best seen by those whose vision is the most com- 
prabensive. The dews of heaven fall upon the earth unseen and 
unfelt, still they cover the earth with verdure, the fields with fra- 
grance and beauty, make the woods redolent with music, replenish 
the sparkling fountain, the murmuring brook and the rushing river, 
and impairt to all nature freshness and vigor. 

The Newspaper press is« in my opinkm, doing good service in the 
country. It accommodales itself to every condition of life, and pla- 
ces the elements of knowledge williin the reach of every eitiaen of 
the Republic ; for, like the wind, there is no spot to which it cannot 
tjraveL It reaches th6 humble cabin in the wilderness. We find it 
in the seatiinary of learning, in the halls of legislation, in the con- 
secrated sanctuary, in the savage's wigwam, and the soldier's tent, in 
4he palace and in the prison. At home and abroad, upon the ocean 
and upon the land) it confers its benrfits upon the rich and the 
poor, the bond and the free. Of the printing press it has been fan- 
eifpUy said, 

"that if a itw 

Were stricken from the dome of night* 
A prlntia; praw, if BtnUoBe«l- thtte, 
WonU fiU the TM^nm to n h«lr» 
And shed a broMier light'* 



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None have derived ^reeter benefile from Ibe press, espedally the 
Newspaper presB, then that imibrtUDate claas of whom I apeak. I 
oere not what a man's intellect may be, it most hare food epoa 
which to feed, even to enable him to comenune with himself. There 
must be a basis for thought, if aot, the world is, to man, a dieary, 
joyless prison-house, and death a weloome mesaengen 

By the aid of science, the tongue of the Mttie has been loosened, 
and his ear unstopped. He has beea taught to read, and thiU is now 
to him a peieunlal blessing, a p«re fountain of joy, wdling op its 
sparkling waters to gladden his journey throi^ lift. It enables hna 
to commune with the past and the praaent, and to look forwaid to 
the cheering hopes of the future. This group who have eigsed tad 
presented this Address, seem a joyous iamily of children gathered 
aronnd the parental threshold. We look upon them and behoU 
brilliant eyes and happy faces; for science has discovered a way to 
make the crushed heart glad, and the dim eye to sparkle. The pa- 
tents of these Mutes may rejoice in their distant homes. The tear 
of grief may be dried up; for that God that toudied Isaiah's hal- 
lowed lips with fire,— that God that hdds the destiny of man in the 
hollow of his hand,— that God that marketh the sparrow's &11, faalh 
watched over your children, and hath tampered the winds to die 
shorn lamb. Tou parted with your beUrved oflbpring with a bleed- 
ing h^rt, but joyous, indeed, will be the greeting on their return. 
The child of misfortune shall be a solace to your declining year% 
and ultimately an honored and useful member of society. 

Barbarism displays itself in an utter dbr^gard of the rights of 
woman, in crushing her under the weight of heavy burdens, m pat- 
ting to death infiints that do not promfae to be vigorous, and gener- 
allj, in contemning the calk of humanity. The revenM of all tUs 
follows in the wake of Christianity a&d civilization. These cruelties 
are unknown in this country, where the mass of the people are in- 
telligent and virtuous. Woman is respected, and in her sphere be- 
comes a peerless queen, virhere the benign precepts of religion pie- 
vail. Her offspring, thou|^ weak, feeble, deaf, blind or deformed, li 
neither put to death, nor suffered to perish from cold, from hunger, 
or in the burning sun. All of which only prove that which has been 
written a thousand years or leas, that as virtue advances vice recedei 
There are plants that flourish only under the protecting hand of the 
philanthropist, and when watered by his tears. They grow best in 



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Chrbtian soil. Tbey flourish in the soil of Indiana; and I cannot 
refrain, upon the present occasion, from saying: honor to Indiana» 
and honor to her people 1 for she has proved her devotion to hu- 
manity's cause. No State in the Union has so flourishing a school 
for the deaf and dumb ; no school in the land so substantial a basis. 
It is now as steadfast as a rock ; for it rests upon the broad, firm 
basis of the constittition. Indiana's philanthropy, thank God ! b in 
the hearts of her people. It is evidenced now by her organic law. 
It is not to be wondered that application for admission into this In- 
stitution come now from abroad ; nor is the rapid growth of our 
State generally a matter of surprise. Multitudes are flocking to our 
bofders, it is true, for ours is a peaceful, fruitful, happy land. 

The Roman matron, when asked for her jewels, pointed to her 
children ; — an American mother would emulate her example and do 
the same. In such a country as ours, a parent should look upon his 
children as tmapeakable blessingn — as treasures committed to his 
keeping — as sweet and tender plants confided to his charge for cul* 
tore and perfection ; but he should never, no, never forget that they 
also belong to God ; that He holds a lien upon them as hostages for 
the faith, the fealty, the fidelity, " the good behavior *' of the pareut. 

To err is human, and a childless man may be forgivcii for a de- 
parture from the path of rectitude; but the pareut who tarnishes 
the reputation of his own offspring, by being false to himself, for- 
feits his recognizance to society, proves himself unfaithful to his 
sacred trust, perfidious to nature, a defalter to God and country. 

In conclusion, I will say, (and thereby subject myself to the chaige 
of having but one idea, for I have said it before,} that truth is at ttie 
foundation of all that is good. It is the basis of every moral virtue, 
and that element alone, iu the character of any man, is worth all 
the false accomplishments of earth. It is a quality worthy of being 
idolized, and worthy of being sought. Inquiry after truth is a plea- 
sing task, a delightful employment; for the reward is always worthy 
of the labor. It is a thing of which a man should neve: be ashamed, 
wherever found. To a young man starting iu the world, better ad- 
vice could not be given than this : ** Be true, and seek after tiulh.*' 

** This, above ail, to thy own aulf be troe ; 
And then it follows, as the ojght tiie day, 
Thou cunst not well be false to any man." 



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Thas spoke the poet and philosopher. The following is equally 
appropriate, and equally beautiful : 

*' Embrace the tnith, whererer foand, 
On heathen or on Chrialian gronnd ; 
Among your friends, among yonr feee» 
The plant** divine, when'er it grow*.** 

I am but a poor advber, for my whole life has been spent in re- 
gretting to-day the errors of yesterday. I speak, therefore, with 
trembling lips and faltering tongue, I hope those to whom shall be 
commuioated what I ha^e said, in response to their addraas, will be- 
lieve me when I say that I have spcAen sincerely. I have said soon 
things because I would impress upon the young and unaiispeetai^ 
upon the pure and the spotless, (who, in buffeting the rough billows 
of the world, have many things yet to learn,) that tlie way ef 
die transgressor is hard, but that the paths of virtue are both plete- 
ant and peaceful. These are the paths that they now porsoe, aad 
Oom which I trust they will never deviate* 



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ADDRBSS OF THE SCHOLARS. 



To ike Hon. Members of the Legislature ef Indiana : 

It. is with feelings of the grcAtost pleasura tfiat we agaia preseal 
ouEaelvee .before the Legislatiure of our State, to give lUterence to 
our.gratiitide9 tor their oontiaued kiodBess towards us: thoiigh we 
ffsel that words are inadequate to express the emotions that swell our 
hearts^ when we contemplate the blessings that surround us; bless- 
io0i» which. under God we owe to you. 

Before the rays of knowledge illuminated our minds, we pursued 
a sUent wayt solitary pilgrims on lile's desert waste, aliens from our 
race, joyless, and alone. 

But BOW, how changed the scene 1 brought here^ by the hand of 
friendship^ and b^nevoIeRce h^ve found companions, to whom we 
are, bound by the tiiss of a comqoon affliction, and in who^e society 
we,enjoy the pleasures of friendly communion, and the happiness of 
sooiallife,. Here, wn have alsofoun^ those, who devote all theii' 
talents to our benefit, who have, in then: generous labors bestowed 
upon us as it were, a new. existence; their cheering words have en~ 
couraged. our trembling steps to tread the paths of wisdom, impart- 
ing to us knowledge that elevate man, to be but a little lower than 
the angeUrand a language in. which to express thoughts, feelings^ am) 
desires, which would otherwise, have been unknown, and unrevealed. 
To every teacher in the Institution we feel, we owe a debt of the 
wannest gratitude, for -benefits more valuable, than all the riches of 
earth could repay. Since we last came before you, we have been 
called upon to rejoice in the possession of a home, erected for us by 
the liberality of the people and Legislature of this State, which in 



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S98 

the beauty of its exterior and comfort of its accommodatioDs, far 
exceeds our utmost expectations. 

These blessings have filled our hearts with jov* and we now ^ 
pear before you a happy throng, chastened but not cast down, 
afflicted, but not foi-saken. And, when in the course of yean, we 
shall leave these pleasing scenes, when bidding farewell to teacben 
and friends, we go forth, to encounter the trials and duties of life, 
the benefits we have received/ will ever be vemembeored with the 
warmest gratitude, and the instructions of our teachers will remain, 
to guide us through this world, and all its sorrows. 

In view of these things, we feel, that in founding, and snstainii^ 
the Institutions of benevolence, no State in the Union surpasses la- 
diana ; for here the woi^d witnessed, for the first time, a gov^rnmeat 
levying a tax on the people, not to support the pride, and pomp of roy- 
alty , not to send (brth hosts of armed men to lay the fair oarlh desolate ; 
but to raise the feeble from the dust, to pour the light of kBOwfedgs 
on the darkened mind, and cheer and bless the troubled spirit It is 
in Indiana alone, that we see the rich and the poor meet together, lo 
share alike, without money and without price in the aospeakaUe 
blessings of education* In the number of those whom her noUe 
beneficence has aided, Indiana also stands pre-eminent« In this Insti- 
tntion, there are 136 pupils, being more in proportion to the popda- 
tion, than are supported by any other State. 

And, in conclusion, permit us to say, that when the faeor shall 
come, which summons the spirit to an unseen world, the thought 
may fall, tike balm upon the soul, that in the hour of strength and 
power, ye had not forgotten the children of sorrow, that the oat 
talent had increased to ten, and happiness descended to maays 
heart, that else had remained, desolate, and forsaken. Such thoogba 
as these will impart joy, when all earth's pleasenss have passed away. 
And in that happier world, where the fetters that bind us b«re shaH 
be burst asunder, where in songs of praise, ae lip shall be muta, so 
voice shall be silent, your joy shall be full, when ye meel thsff 
whom on earth you have aided, fireed from all sorrow, rejoiciag for- 
ever in the presence of God. 

MART 8t. C. B£LCSB8, JdRoMa. 

MARY & ORCHARD, Moatsa. 

CYRUS MoCARTER, Rnaii. 

EDWIN N. BOWES, Laporte. 



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Ctani%; 

ORLANDO OMOOD, 0Mrboni. 

HENRY WUiK)N» 'Rp^eottoa. 

ALBERT UNDERWOOD, JdUtton. 

FRANCI8 A. GRUMPTON, Fountain. 

JAMES 8. LATTIN» Floyd. 

JOSEM POLLERS, Cftmn. 

JOHN 6. WICKERSHAM, Ttppmno*. 

LAFAYETTE BROWN, Rnah. 

JOHN J. MBD^ARIS, Wayne. 

DAVIDKISER, Tlppeottnoa. 

CALTXN W. WALL, Tlppacaaoe. 

JAMES M. LOYD, Oniige. 

GIDEON KEPNGR, Fottntala. 

JOSEPH 8URBER, Marioo. 

THOMAS J. COMPTON, Elkhart. 

ROBERT P. HOPKINS, Vigow 

ELIAS UNDERWOOD, Joluuan. 

BENAJAH NARDYKE, WMta. 

RICHARD H. HATTON, HamlKoa. 

WILLIAM W. WARD, Uaiaa. 

TIMOTHY SIMMONS, Jan&inga. 

ABRAX WININGS, OUo. 

NORMAN LEAP, Swltzarland. 

ALLAN W. MEHARY, Montgomery. 

ANDREW KBPNER, FooHtalm. 

JAMES MoPARLAND, Mtail. 

MICHAEL SWARTZ, Floyd. 

WILLIAM WAY, Oiaaga. 

ELEABBR ITARKfiR, Daeaton 

AMOS HADLBY, Maigaa. 

JOHN H. B7ULTZ, H«niltaii 

ASHBR TANNER, DeKalK 

JOSEPH MILLER, Laporte. 

LUTHER P. WALL, Tlppeeaaoo. 

JOHN H. GOODWIN, Rnah. 

JAMES GOODWIN, Rush. 

JOHN D. COLLINS, Shelby. 

JAMES SEBRING, Allen. 

JOHN W. SENIOR, JoAsma. 

JOHN R. MOORE, Montgomery. 

JOHN H. LAWSON, Decatur. 

WILLIAM WOLF, Fimnklin. 

EMANUEL STULTZ, Hamilton. 

CLINTON SHIMBR, Randolph. 

HENRY M. TIFFANY, Montgomery. 

HENRY MILLSAP8, Latmnee. 

PETER N. NICOLES, Miami. 

B. GOODWIN, Owen. 



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314 

iVismct. Gnmf|r. 

WILLIAM WOLF, Franklin. 

EMANUEL STULTZ, HamUton. 

CLINTON SHIMER, Randolfifa. 

HENRY M. TIFFANY, Montgommy. 

HENRY MILI^AFS, Lawrence. 

PETER N. NIC0LE8, Miami. 

B. GOODWIN, Owen. 
ELISHA L. GRAHAM, Shelby. 

C. GOODWIN, Rusli. 
ELLEN MILLER, Gllwon. 
SARAH SHIMER, Randolph. 
PRIALLA R. McLEAN, Fountain. 
CYNTHA J. VORIS, Switzeriand. 
REBECCA HARTMAN, Boone. 
MARY E. VEST, Floyd. 
SUSANNAH HADLEY, Morgan. 
MARY ANN OWENS, Switzeriand. 
MARY J. MADDOX, Montgomery. 
ELISABETH HATTON, Hamilton. 
MARY JANE HATTON, HamUton. 
MARGARET E. HOLDEN, Deaxborn. 
MARY JANE BARKER, Decatar. 
RACHEL DAY, DeKaib. 
COMFORT JANE FULTON, Orange. 
ELIZABETH VANDERPOOL, Monroe. 
MARY ANN DAYWALT, Hnntlngton. 
LOUISA W. OSBORN, Marion. 
ELIZABETH LIECHNER, Deariwm. 
MARY E. GRIMES, Vanderbargh. 
MARY DINSMt)RE, Monroe. 
ELLEN BUCHANNAN, Switzeriand. 
CATHARINE DBBOY, Wayne. 
RUTH POOL, Clinton. 
MARGARET OWENS, Switzerland. 
ANN ELIZABETH McCOY, Decatur. 
EMELINE B. HULL, Venniffion. 
LYDIA CARPER, Marion. 
ELIZABETH DEBOY, Wayne. 
MARY E. ARNETT, Montgomery. 
MARY GOODWIN, Owen. 
ROSETTA MESSLER, Elkhart 
MARY J. ELLIS, Hendrieki. 
ELIZA J. FORD, Deoatnr. 
LUCINDA MICHAEL, Clinton. 
MARY A. EDMISTER, Jenninga. 
AUSTIN W. MANN, Henry. 



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Doc. No. 8.] [Part H. 

THE 

ADDRESS 

OP 

COL. JAMES H. LANE. 

PRESIDEKT OF THE SENATE, 
05 PRSSBNTI5G TO THE SENAT£ THE 

ADDRESS OF THE PUPILS 

OP THE 

DEAF AND DUMB ASYLUM, 

TO THB 

LEGISLATURE: 
AND ALSO THAT ADDRESS. 



50M COPIES OSOEKED TO BE PRINTED. 



IMOIAHAPOLIS: 

S. p. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 
1851. 

SD90 



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Doc. No. 9.] [Part II. 

REPORT 



OFTHB 



JOINT COMMITTEE, 



APPOWTED BY THE 



SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



TO INVESTIGATE CERTAIN CHARGES AGAINST THE 



COMMISSIONERS AND OTHER OFFICERS 



OFTHB 



INDIANA HOSPITAL 



VOBTHB 



INSANE. 



MM COPIES ORDERED TO BE PRIHTBD.— FEB. IS 



INDlANAPOLISs 

J. P, CHAPMAN. STATE PHIHTBB. 

1851. 
3D31 



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REPORT. 



Mb. PRBSIDXlfT: 

The Joint Committeey appointed to investigate charges against the 
Superintendent and officers of the **Indiana Hospital for the Insane**' 
beg leave to submit their report: 

The serious nature of the charges, coupled with the respectable 
character of the individual making them, induced the committee to 
nistitute a thorough investigation. 

To effect this, they have examined patiently every witness within 
their reach, where evidence could be supposed to develope or eluci- 
date any facts necessary to enable them to arrive at a correct con- 
clusion. 

If charges against tbe Institution of ^'Extravagance, Corruption 
and Cruelty to the Inmates" be true, the public have a right to know 
it, with a view to their correction; if untrue, the standing of those 
implicated, no less than the credit of our State, demands a prompt 
exposition of the slanders. 

The committee unite in expressing their conviction from the evi- 
dence adduced, that the Board of commissioners have in the dia- 
charee of their official duties, been guided by a commendable zeal 
for the welfare of the Institution, and the benefit of that unfortunate 
class of society who constitute its inmates. During the erection or 
furnishing the building, no case has been presented leading even to 
the suspicion, that any member of the Board has directly or indi- 
rectly engaged with any of the contracts. A By-Law of the Insti- 
tution requires that ''no resident officer, attendant or assbtant, shall 
be directly or indirectlv, interested in the purchase of any article for 
the use of the Hospital.*' The committee have abundant evidence 
to convince them that instructions in accordance with the spirit of 
this law, have been repeatedly delivered to the Steward. If any vi- 
olation did occur, it was in the fact adduced on this investigation, 
that an account of an inconsiderable amount for articles of suppliev 



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330 

was made by the Steward, and settled by the Boards (but not with- 
out a remark of its impropriety) with a mercantile house of this 
city, one member of which firm is likewise a member of the Board 
of Commissioners. This was done by the Steward without instnic- 
tions to do so» and because he alleged he could procure these articles 
at a lower price and better quality than elsewhere. 

The charge of extravagance in the purchase of the carriage al- 
luded to» the committee are of opinion is unfounded, and they would 
report the selection as entirely proper and economical under the cir- 
cumstances. Their examinations in relation to alleged abuses of 
Gtients extended back to the earliest period of the existence of the 
ititution. Facts were elicited clearly, proving to all, that instances 
of severity of treatment towards inmates had occurred, and their 
frequency at the early period of its history, resulted from the want 
of a sufficient number of attendants present, their inexperience and 
the fact that every class and grade of patients were then crowded 
together in the same ward. 

1^0 case was proved to have been so treated under the eye of the 
Superintendent, without receiving his prompt and unqualified disap- 
probation ; nor could we learn of an instance of any abuse perpe- 
trated by attendants, coming to his knowledge without meeting from 
him with severe rebuke. Another cause of the more frequent oc- 
currence of these abuses at that period was attributable to the fact 
proved, that the subordinates (in the neglect of their duty,) failed to 
report the same to the Superintendent, who we are well assured was 
ignorant of their occurrence, until developed in an examination held 
before the Board of Commissioners in the fall of 1849. 

Since that time^ a period of seventeen mont/is, not a single case of 
abuse or maltreatment is even alleged to have occurred^ if we except 
the case of the individual who lost his eye. If for this, any blame 
be attached to Doctor Patterson, it can be but an error of judgment, 
to justify which, it may be said he was following a practice pursued 
under like circumstances in other institutions. The unfortuuate se- 
quel was no less the result of accident, than the favorable condition 
of the patient at the time to the development of that inflammation 
which destroyed his eye. Added to this the patient himself intro- 
duced into the already highly inflamed organ, lime, sand and like 
irritants calculated to efiect its destruction, and at the same time 
violently opposed the application of proper remedial means for its 
relief. The evidence moreover shows clearly that neither the pa- 
tient himself, or any of his friends, attached any blame to the Super- 
intendent for any intentional injury. This is the only case among 
those alleged in which even the most trifling injury was inflicted. 

Without an exception, the testimony of every one proves that the 
demeanor and conduct of the Superintendent, Dr. Patterson, has 
been universally kind, courteous and polite. The manner in which 
the duties of Assistant Physician, Matron and Steward [are dis- 
ehargod,] is worthy of all praise and commendation. Kindness i6 



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321 

patients and watchful carefulneaa are strenuously enjoined on and 
observed by the attendants. 

The committee^ in the dischai^ of the duty assigned them, visited 
the Hospital, and were fully admitted into and inspected every por- 
tion of the building. From a thorough examination, they report 
that the order, cleanliness and apparent comfort of every part calls 
forth their warmest approbation. 

Among the charges was an implied censure of the course of treat* 
ment of the patients by the Superintendent The committee would 
reply by saying, that they are assured the selection of Doctor Pat* 
terson was made by the Board solely from the recommendations of 
competent persons abroad, and as a proof of the wisdom of their 
choice, they simply state the fact that the proportions of cures in 
this Institution has been really greater, in comparison with the ad* 
missions, than in any asylum in the country. 

Nor will the committee close without giving expression to an as« 
surance to every citizen of Indiana who may now have, or mav 
hereafter commit, a friend to the care of the Institution, that with 
its present officers, and under its recent organization, they have a 
guarantee of the utmost kindness for their comfort, and correct treat- 
ment for their relief. 

And the joint committee ask, respectfully, to be discharged from 
any further consideration of the subject. 

JAMES S. ATHON, Ch% 
GEO. B. GRAFF, 
N. EDDY, 
JOHN HUNT, 
BENJAMIN HENTON, 
W. G. MONTGOMERY, 
ROBERT H. CRAWFORD, 
ELI LEWIS, 
L HUTCHINSON. 
IniianofoHsi February 13, 185L 



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Doc. No. 10.] [Part IL 

MESSAGE 



OF 



GOVERNOR WRIGHT 



on BSTUSHIHG TO TBX 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



BILL NO. 330, PASSED AT THE LAST SESSION OF THE LEGISLATURE, 
FOR THE RELIEF OF ANN BLYTHE8T0NE, OF ALLEN COUNTY. 



IKDIAM APOLIS: 
J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 
1851. 
3D32 



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MESSAGE. 



To the House of Representatives: 

Gentlemen — The accompanying bill, entitled, an act for the relief 
of Ann Biythestone, of Allen county, No. 330, was passed at the 
last session of the General Assembly, but not having been presented 
to me for approval until within the last two days before the final 
adjournment, the same is now returned as provided by the Constitu- 
tion, with my reasons briefly stated for withholding my signature. 

The principle involved in this bill is, that of referring claims upon 
the treasury to the final adjustment of pei-sons wholly irresponsible, 
to tribunals specially constituted, thereby involving additional' ex- 
penses, &c. 

The Legislature itself possesses the power to decide all such 
claims. It has the right to send for persons and papers, to appoint 
the appropriate committees to investigate the claims of our citizens 
against the State. If such claims are just, they should be allowed 
and paid. It is far better to appropriate the money direct, than in 
this indirect manner to cripple the treasury, by subjecting it to de- 
mands uncertain in amount, and frequently unjust in their character. 

If the principle of referring claims upon the treasury to self-con- 
stituted and wholly irresponsible tribunals for adjustment is adhered 
to, we shall lose sight of the doctrine of the responsibility of repre- 
sentatives to their constituents in the appropriations of the public 
money. 

The correct rule is, that the members of each session are, and 
should be responsible for their own acts ; and that no money or 
claims should be appropriated or allowed, either directly or indi- 
rectly , without making, at the same time, provision for their payment 
by taxation or otherwise. Do not refer a matter of dollars and 
cents, against the State, to any tribunal for investigation. It b your 
province to decide it yourselves. 

The people have a clear right to ask their representatives to vote 
directly upon all appropriations of money from the public treasury. 



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328 

The State has suffered greatly when the L^latare has been per- 
suaded to create special tribunals to settle long standing or rejected 
claims. 

This claim may be a meritorious one. If you should believe it is 
just and proper, appropriate the amount directly, and I am sure you 
will hear no objection from me. It is the principk involved which 
induces me, in accordance with the rule thai i have laid down for 
my government in my first address to the Legislature, to return this 
bill, and ask at your hands a reconsideration of the same. 

JOSEPH A. WRIGHT. 

December 31, 1850. 



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f)oc. No. IL] ^ [ Part 11. 

VETO MESSAGE 



OP 



GOVERNOR WRIGHT 



/ 
DM 



RETURNING TO THE SENATE 



ILL no. ns, PASSBD AT TBB SBBSION OF 18«>S0, BBIKO AR ACT FOR THE RBUBF 
OF CBBTAUI PBRBON8 THSRBIN NAMBD, IN WABRKN COUltTY. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 
1851. 
3D 33 



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MESSAGE. 



To the Senate of Indiana: 

Gentlemen : The accompanying bill, No. 212, an act for the relief 
of certain persons therein named, in Warren county, was passed at the 
last session of the General Assembly, but not having been pre- 
sented to me until the last two days before the final adjournment, 
the same is now returned, as provided by the Constitution, with a 
mere statement of the reasons why I withhold my signature. 

1st. The school fund that is attempted to be released by this bill 
(the sum of about $2,500 as I am informed) belongs to the people 
of Warren county, and the people of said pounty, or their agents, 
have the sole right to release or discharge the same. 

2d. That the principle of saying by an act of the Legislature that 
no court in this State shall take jurisdiction of such a case, or such 
a suit therein named is a violation of a clear vested right according 
to the letter and spirit of the decision of the cause of Gantly, les* 
see, v. Ewing, Z7. S. Supreme Court Reports^ Sd Howard^ page 717. 

According to the doctrine held in this cause the Legislature has 
no power ^' under the disguise of regulating the remedy, to defeat an 
obligation or con ti act." 

In the case under consideration, not only is the remedy attempted 
to be regulated, but it is entirely swept away; the debt not only re- 
leased and discharged, but all the courts of the country are prohib- 
ited from taking jurisdiction of the cause. The only wonder is that 
there is not also provided a penalty upon the judge or court who 
would dare to enforce the rights of the children of Warren county 
to this, their own necessary fund given them by the munificence of 
the general government. 

3d. If this system is once adopted we shall have numerous ex 
parte applications to take away the jurisdiction of courts in actions 
asainst the securities of sheriffs, tresurers, &c., the practical effect 
of which will be, 

4th. To make the Legislature a court of appeals to try^and de- 



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332 

termine what actions shall be brought, against whom, who shall pay 
security debts, and who shall not. 

5th. The tendency of such legislation is well calculated to 
make unsafe and insecure the rights of the citizen. In this way 
their rights are decided in their absence, and consequently the man 
who is involved in the greatest amount of security debts will devote 
his time in the lobbies of o)ir Legislature, whioh, by this course, will 
become the place of management, deciding in this ex parte man- 
ner, past rights and duties, in the place of making laws for the 
government of the people. 

For these reasons merely stated, your attention is again invited to 
a reconsideration of this bill. 

JOSEPH. A. WRIGHT. 

December 30, 1851. 






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Doc. No. 18.] [Part II. 

STATISTICAL TABLE 



OPTHB 



SEVENTH CENSUS 



[ABRAlfOBO UllBBB SBVSSITT DIPPERBRT HEADS. | 



ALSO, 



A TABLE SHOWING THE DIFFERENT DENOMINATIONS OF 
RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES, &.C. 



IH THE 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



SENATE FEB. 5«li.-«,0W COPIES ORDERED TO BE PRINTED. 



IHOIAMAPOLI8: 

J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER. 
1851. 

3D34 



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MARSHALL OFFICE, | 
Indianapolu, February 4, 1S51. ) 

Hon. Jambs H. Lane, 

President of the Senate: 

Sir — I have this day completed a statistical table of the seventh 
census, from the returns of the Assistant Marshals, arranged under 
seventy different heads. Also, a table showing the different denom- 
inations of religious societies. The first table contains the number 
of inhabitants and statistics of each county in the State, alphabeti- 
cally arranged ; the second table contains the number of churches 
of the different denominations, and value of church property of 
each. Both of which I herewith present to the people of the State 
of Indiana, through their Representatives, for the purpose of being 
placed in the State Library. 

Please lay this communication before the body which you have 
the honor to preside over. 

Very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

S. MEREDITH, 
U. 8. MaPshaU District of Indiana. 



In Senate, February 5, 185L 

On motion by Mr. Ellis, 
The statistical table was laid upon the table, and 5000 copies or- 
dered to be printed and distributed with the laws. 

F. EMERSON, 
Secretary of the Senate. 



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352 



TABLE NO. I.— CoBliBBed. 

Showing the number of Colleges^ Pupils^ Common Schools, Litna- 
rieSf volumes therein ^ Newspapers^ circulation^ CAutcheSf and 
value of Church Property. 



XtoMt •/ CtfuntUa* 


4 


4 

I 


1 

\ 
I 


1 


1 


1 


i 


5 

1 


i 

i 


Adami^ 






28 
06 
44 

8 

1 
86 

"ii" 

55 
57 


1 
1 


3S0 
950 


t 

9 
S 


850 
1400 
1.00 


5 

19 
90 




Allen, 

Butholomew 


3 
S 


S80 
0S 


BBBton, 






BUckfonl 














5 

39 
9 

19 
11 
46 

7 
M 
11 
15 
39 
46 

9 
16 

8 
19 
34 
SO 
96 
36 
11 
19 
14 
18 

4 
15 
41 
S3 
44 
10 

6 
98 

1 

9 
67 
3D 
44 
99 

9 

5 

7 
91 
91 
99 
54 

4 
6 
13 
94 
48 
44 
5 
15 


2,91 


Boone, ...' 


1 


75 


1 


400 






n^ 


Brown, 

Carroll, 


9 
1 


'"iio" 

«55 
600 


li,39l 


Caee, ...................... 


5 
S 


100 
134 


S3 


9810 


]7«8t 


Clark...... 


S«,7A 
1^ 


Clay, 






Cliuton, 






75 
S4 
37 
«I 
103 










1^ 


Crawford, 


1 


100 


7 
#1 


700 
400 






S,M 


Davieu, 


1 
S 
1 


500 

1900 
400 


ll/N 


Dearborn, 






M,M 


Decatur,.... 


1 
1 


4S 


1 


mo 


S9.1B 


DeKalb, 


1^ 


Delaware, 


50 
8 
110 
64 
49 
80 
60 
31 
60 
50 
57 
55 
« 
03 
06 
76 


1 


310 


1 


400 


5.W 


Dubois, 


3 

1 
1 
S 
1 

s 


1(0 
30 
75 

190 
40 
60 


14^ 


Elkhart 


1 


1 

s 

9 
1 

9 


590 
950 

9074 
710 
]8S0 


1],NI 


Payette,' 

noyd 






njn 


3 

1 
1 


3700 
30 
590 


41.S* 


Fountain, .................. 


itSm 


FrankUu, 


3U4I 


Pnlton. 


iS 


Oibeon, 


1 


00 


1 


'ICOO 


1 
1 


3i0 
300 


lojn 


Grant, 


8,7» 


Greene,.. 








MN 


Hamilton. 




.... .... 






1 
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1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


300 
900 
0?9 
400 
500 
400 
1900 
400 


sJn 


Hancock 








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1 


1S2 


9 
3 


750 
J70 


n^ 


Hendricks 


»S 


Henry, ...*. 






ICJB 


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8 


800 


8^ 


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«0 
47 
11 
33 
103 
85 
57 
80 
60 
« 
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)03 
60 
80 
84 
18 


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:m 


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1 

3 


80 
S41 










l.fiS 






s 
1 


4490 

700 


9ja 


Jenninaa 


1 


1900 


9.611 


Johnson, 


1 
3 


134 
135 


wm 


iLnoz i. 

Kosciusko, 


1 


9000 


9 
1 


too 

848 
400 


3«a 

4.71* 


Itairanae. ................ . 


1 
I 
9 


50 
40 
105 


;:;:;:::::::::: 


m 


uR!^.......;;.:;:;;;...;;: 


11 


1785 


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Laoorte. 


S 
1 


1100 
700 


siSi 


Lawrence, 


1 


1900 


S0,73l 


Madison 


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^•«r 


V^ 


Marion 

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6 

1 


ab,600 

395 


5 


10,834 


«« 


Martin, .* 


1 
3 
A 


390 
170 
S85 


:;:;;:::::: 1 


1,79 


MUml, 


85 
63 

104 
34 
84 
S6 


10 
5 
3 


1195 
7000 
6000 


1 

3 
ft 
1 
1 
8 


400 
9900 
1000 

aoi 

300 

iCO 


V» 


Monroe, 

Montgomery 




Moraan 






SM« 


Soffe. .:::::::.:::::::::::: 






, ,( 


1^ 


Ohio 


1 


ioo 


' ,,•. 


B/» 



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353 



TABLE NO. 1.— CoDtinned. 

Showing the. number of Colleges, Pupils, Common Scho(ds, Libraries^ 
volumes therein. Newspapers, circulation. Churches, and value tf 
Church property. 



Jfmi^ 9f C—nti$§. 


5 


i 

i 


s 


3 


1 

i 


4 


1 


3 

i 


I 

s 


Ofhhm* •••• •••••••••••••«• 






59 
49 
69 
17 
11 
49 
40 
6 
183 
90 
91 
56 
96 
110 
46 
75 
09 
68 


1 






95 
90 
96 

8 
14 

6 
18 

1 
56 
39 
40 
46 
16 
98 
14 

4 
17 
17 
30 


9.000 
8.900 


OW6fl •.....•... 












Parko, 


3 


45 


1 
1 


500 
500 


1 
1 


550 

600 


17,300 
5,095 




Pike, 






Porter, 






1 

6 


450 
30O0 


1 
1 


3?9 
450 


PoMy .....■.•....•...■•■>. 


1 


50 


Pulaski, 


Putn ftiD .••••■■••>. •■••«*T'« 


1 


900 






« 


408 


94,400 
5,450 

10,960 

109,930 

O^M 

19>90 
4,195 
4,000 

90S0 
6,750 

18.880 


RandolplL, 






gipify 

Raih, 

Scott, 


1 
3 


40 
153 






1 
9 


5'0 
1050 


1 


1100 


Shelby, 


1 


60 






1 

1 


560 
450 




1 


950 


Stenben .•••••.•••■••. 


1 


00 


St. Joseph 






1 


1000 


Sullivan, 






1 


750 


Swltserland, 










Starke, 






1 
64 
16 
50 
39 
59 
61 
69 
36 
46 
70 
195 
44 
30 
97 










tISSS"^:.::::::::::::::: 


5 


415 


1 
1 
1 


1000 

SOOO 

160 


4 


9940 


39 

11 
97 
90 
17 

93 
9 
90 
41 
68 
19 
8 
6 


43,000 
490 


UnioR, 


9 

1 


130 
30 






11,500 

■^ 

?:« 

90,500 
68,095 
4S0O 


Vanderburgh 

VermillioD, 


7 
1 
4 
9 

1 
1 
3 
5 

1 


9380 
300 

3450 
650 
400 
3C0 

1375 

30C0 
150 






Vigo 

Wahaah, 


3 


179 






1 
3 


1000 
550 


Warren, ' 1 




Warrick, 


1 
3 
9 


40 
165 
165 


Washington, 






Wavne 






weiii:;.. :;;;;;:...:: : 






White 




1 


150 


4;nt 

]>00 


Whitley, 






















ToUl, 1 


83 


5990 


5699 


117 1 


75,416 


98 1 


97,094 


1899 


•1,699.711 



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RECAPITULiflON. 

TABLE NO. I. 

Nvwber of dwelliofi in the St«te, ie6.1fll 

Npinber of inb&UUnU, MoSb 

yuu* of Retl Biute owned, •ITO.^Sl 

Number tttended school,- SSS 

Niu&bMr married within the year, uSai 

Number who cannot read and write, 7SOf7 

Numbor of Blind, . . \ '*'5S 

Number of Deaf and Dumb, 517 

NoDtber of Insane, 4^. 

Number of Idiotic, 5l7 

Numbor of Paupers, •-••.-..... gmi 
Number of Convicts, .......... p|* 

Number of Deaths during the year, ]3J7f 

Number of Farms, - .......... lOlSn 

Number of Acres of Land— improved, ..... 4JV7JS7 

Nmnber of Acres of Land— unimproved, IjiSBM 

>— >-- — f2JS&iJn% 

Cash value of Farms. ti9e,9Ss!sn 

Value of farming implements, ......... fQ,648,79t 

Number of Hones, .......... 310 Vm 

Number of Asses and Mules, 7.0tt^ 

Numberof Milch Cows, seotSft' 

Number of Working Oxen, 37 108 

Number of other Cattle, . • - 3ft5 M9 

Number of >heep hWUAlZ 

Numberof Swine, -.•-...... •S,3H,g09 

Value of live stock, .J ....... . fssno^gTg 

Value of Orchard products, *......... tS?»flOO 

Gallons of Wine, • 13S 

Value of produce of Market Gardens, ........ #68.134 

£o«<>d« of Butter, 18,787,547 

Pounds of Cheese, ........... t^4M 

Tons of Hay, ........... 400.004 

Buehels ef Clover Seed, .......... ]7«9i 

BasheU of other grass seed, .<....... ie,g8t 

Pounds of Hops, ........... l34jB85 

Tons of Hemp, ........... jgj 

Pounds of Flax, ........... 959 srg' 

Bushels of Flax Seed, 35i(77 

Pounds of Silk Cocoons, I'SBt 

Bufhale of Wheat, 6.457 «U 

Bttibels of Rye, ^ 80 M 

Kushels of Buckwheat, -•.-...... 174'flf;S 

Bu»hels of Indian Corn. ........ S1,449j8M 

Buehels of Oats, -.-.•...... 5 S69A4S 

Bushels of Barley, 39,OfS 

Poundf of Tobacco, .......... 1,058J79 

Pounds of Wool, '..-....... qj(f79JH9 

BiiBhels of Peas and Beans, ......... 3g jgo 

Bbxhels of Irish Potatoes, .......... i,goo*6i3 

Bushels of Sweet Potatoes, ......... 911 J9S 

Pounds of Maple Sugar, .......... 9034,797 

Gallons of Molasses, .......... 181 Jl8 

Founds of Beeswax and Honey, ......... 830,991 

Value of Home-made manufactures, - ....... $1,682,918 

Value of Animals slaughtered, ......... $$^668,374 

SKAHDrACTCKIIfO nTASLISHMUirrB^ 

CapiUl iuvented in real and personal estate, t7,93SJ99 

Value of annual producU, ........ $19,199,081 

RealesUte, $108,394,489 

Personal esUte, 834JES'.).4B1 

True Valuation, 8180,944,99$ 

number of Colleges, q 

Ifumber of Pupils, $jai$ 

Number of Common Schools, ......... g agf 

Numberof Libraries, .......... 117 

ft umber of Volumes therein, ......... 75,418 

Numberof Newspapers, ......... gg 

Circulation, \ . 67,98« 

Number of Churches, 1^899 

Value of church property, $l,4e0,711 



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RECAPITULATION. 

TABLE NO. 3. 



Nwnber of Methodiit Epiicop&l Churclies, 

Value of church property, 
Romber of ProtesUnt Methodiet Churchei, 

Value of church property, 
Number of Weileyan Methodist Churches, 

Value of church property. 
Number of AUbright Methodist Churches, 

Value of church property, 
Number of Old School Presbyterian Cborchea, 

Value of church property. 
Number of New School Presbyterian Churches, 

Value of church property. 
Number of Cumberland Presbyterian Churches, 

Value of church property. 
Number of Associate Refonned Pres. Churches, 

Value of church property, 
Number of Begttlar Baptist Churches, - 

Value of church property, 
Number of Reformed Baptist Churches, 

Value of church property. 
Number of Missionary Baptist • hurches. 

Value of church property. 
Number of United Brethren Churciies, > 

Value of church property. 
Number of Lutheran < hurches. 

Value of church property, ' 
Number of Evangelical Association Churches, 

Value of church property, 
Number of Roman Catholic Churches, • 

Value of church property. 
Number of Friends* Churches, 

Value of church property, 
Number of Christian t hurches. 

Value of church property. 
Number of Episcopalian Churches, 

value of church property, 
Number of Universalist churches. 

Value of church property, 
Number of Radical Churches, 

Value of church property, 
Number of Congregationalist Churches, 

Value of church property. 
Number of Seceders* Churches, 

^ Value of church property. 

Number of Newlight Churches, 

Value of church property. 
Number of Tunker Churches, • 

Value of church propezty, 



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